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New compression protocol?


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#1 jarlmaster47

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Posted 19 February 2018 - 01:22 PM

As games get larger and larger, it feels like something has to be done to combat this. Can't we further compress files? Is there some new compression protocol or technology that we can use to reduce game file size? It seems to me that there should be some room for innovation and development in these basic file system technologies.



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#2 OldPhil

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Posted 19 February 2018 - 01:36 PM

I pulled this off the net.  Compression may hurt gaming performance! 

 

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/178301-32-file-compression-faster-performance


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#3 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 20 February 2018 - 04:44 AM

This problem of applications - not just games - getting bigger with the passage of time is a general fact of life. Part of it is that the users demand more features, better performance, better graphics and so on. Part of it is the way software is written these days, much is done by taking pre-existing routines and libraries and modifying them to suit but this comes at a price - bigger files.

 

As an example take Doom. The first time I ran into it was when I was a student at the local technical college in the '90s. v1, which I think was to be found on almost every computer in the place, started in seconds and came on one floppy disc - maximum capacity 1.4MB. The last version I looked at took up most of a DVD (4.7 GB) and took five minutes almost to launch.

 

But this is a consequence in part of developments in computing power. My first computer, a second hand 386 bought at the same time I was playing Doom v1, came with a 40 MB hard drive and 16 kB of RAM. Into this fitted DOS 6.20, Windows 3.x and a full version of MS Office. The Win 10 installation files come to 3GB+ of data today. But computers  today have also changed. My primary computer, my desktop, has a 3.4 GHz processor, 12GB of RAM and a total of 3TB of storage so these larger installations do not have a negative effect on performance. But better written, more compact code would certainly speed things up more !

 

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#4 Platypus

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Posted 20 February 2018 - 06:13 AM

16 kB of RAM


You may have misremembered a little there. :)

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#5 jarlmaster47

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Posted 20 February 2018 - 10:43 AM

Sure compression introduces latency via the need for decompression. But one wonders how much it hurts gaming performance. Add improving decompression algorithms to the mix lol. 
 

As for coding, "sloppy code" makes some sense. Code today is much more complex than code was 5 years ago and too many devs don't put in their best efforts coding wise (or so it would seem). Ridiculous publisher deadlines certainly don't help the matter though. So then the question becomes how has coding improved in recent years? What major innovations have been made beyond optimizations here and there? Maybe this is a use case for self-writing code. There are algorithms that can modify and expand on their own coding. It's pretty cool. I guess I feel that there needs to be some innovation in game development to reduce game file size and also, to buck this trend of releasing unfinished/poorly optimized games.






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