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Need help with WIN10 Partitions


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#1 Mick10

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Posted 17 February 2018 - 02:33 PM

Hello; my machine is about 2 1/2 years old. I have two partitions on my drive; I have the C: for programs plus I created a D: for things like files; and I also have an X: which is encrypted. When I created the partitions I apparently made them too large, now my machine is saying it is running out of space on the C: drive. What are my options to fix this problem? TYIA


Edited by britechguy, 17 February 2018 - 09:06 PM.
Moved since partitioning is not Windows 10, nor even OS specific.


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#2 Mick10

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Posted 17 February 2018 - 04:41 PM

If I save my files on D:, then delete that drive can I make a smaller D: drive without disturbing my encrypted X: drive? or is there a better way? 



#3 britechguy

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Posted 17 February 2018 - 09:10 PM

There are all sorts of third party disk partition managers as well as disk management built in to Windows itself.

 

My personal favorite is Mini Tool Partition Wizard, which has a free version which is the link I've given.  You should always take a full system image backup of your current system to an external backup drive before adjusting existing partitions on a drive.

 

Partition Wizard makes it very easy to resize partitions within the full amount of space you have if you've made one partition too small and another too large.  See the examples at their website.  I believe one of them is very similar to your situation with the exception of encryption, which is not really relevant, per se.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

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#4 RolandJS

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Posted 18 February 2018 - 08:49 AM

"...If I save my files on D..."  What folders and files would you move from C to D?


"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

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#5 Mick10

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Posted 18 February 2018 - 12:01 PM

There are all sorts of third party disk partition managers as well as disk management built in to Windows itself.

 

My personal favorite is Mini Tool Partition Wizard, which has a free version which is the link I've given.  You should always take a full system image backup of your current system to an external backup drive before adjusting existing partitions on a drive.

 

Partition Wizard makes it very easy to resize partitions within the full amount of space you have if you've made one partition too small and another too large.  See the examples at their website.  I believe one of them is very similar to your situation with the exception of encryption, which is not really relevant, per se.

 

many thanks, I'll look into it



#6 Mick10

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Posted 18 February 2018 - 12:03 PM

"...If I save my files on D..."  What folders and files would you move from C to D?

what I meant was, if I backup/save my files on D: then try to resize it....

 

I think I have deleted all useless files (e.g. dowloaded program exe files) and moved as many files to D: as I can already. All that is really left on C: is the main OS files and other programs


Edited by Mick10, 18 February 2018 - 12:05 PM.


#7 britechguy

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Posted 18 February 2018 - 12:14 PM

Well, if you had extensive numbers of non-OS files that had been stored on C: that have now been moved to D: your problem may already be solved without doing anything further.

 

Open File Explorer and click on "This PC" then take a look at what's shown as far as how much space you have on each of your logical drives (which correspond to the partitions).  None should be showing the "amount of space taken" bar in red.

 

I always like to have about 25% free space, at a minimum, on the OS drive, and if you don't, and the partition for D: is next to the partition for C: and it's nowhere near to full, I'd expand the C: partition such that it takes some of the D: partition's space.  The partition manager takes care of moving the actual data in D: as needed to accomplish this.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

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#8 Mick10

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Posted 18 February 2018 - 12:20 PM

thanks Brian. Yes I was aware of that, and my C; drive does show in the red still even after I deleted as many files as I can. Only about 9GB empty space left. I have around 600GB free on D: so I can move some over once I figure out how to do it.

 

Q: when I use that tool (partition wizard) to move space from D: to C:, will it leave the saved files (mostly docs and videos) alone and not erase any of them?

 

TYIA



#9 britechguy

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Posted 18 February 2018 - 12:30 PM

Mick,

 

          Provided there is room in the D: partition for everything you have in there plus additional space for more, and what you wish to "steal from" it for C: wouldn't make it too small for what's already there, Partition Wizard will take care of moving all of the data in D: such that C: can snag the space you want it to have from the beginning of the D: partition.

 

          Please take a look at the site and the examples.   The screen shots and walk-through examples will make this much clearer than I ever could by trying to describe it in words.  A picture is worth . . .


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

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#10 RolandJS

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Posted 18 February 2018 - 07:09 PM

Speaking from experience via Acronis Disk Director' operation of changing partitions' sizes, and the taking of data folders and files from one partition and moving same over into another partition, can surprisingly take a lot of time!  And with ADD, the moved data was parked into a strangely-named directory within the new home (data's target partition). 


"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#11 britechguy

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Posted 18 February 2018 - 08:15 PM

Just to be clear, I don't use the partition manager to do anything other than resize the partitions.  I do all file and folder cut and paste (and that's usually how I do it) between one logical drive (AKA partition) to another via side-by-side file explorer windows before doing anything with repartitioning.

 

My impression was that the OP had done, by whatever method, what I described above and was ready to resize the partitions.  When I do that with Partition Wizard it simply moves whatever files and folders in the partition being shrunk to fit within the new partition and then hands over the free space created at the place where the two partitions abut each other at the start of one partition to the end of the other.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#12 Mick10

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Posted 18 February 2018 - 08:39 PM

Yes, what I did was split C: into C: and D: and moved the files from C: to D: but I didnt allow for OS updates etc so I made C: too small and have to now expand it by borrowing back from the D:



#13 Mick10

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Posted 20 February 2018 - 01:33 PM

There are all sorts of third party disk partition managers as well as disk management built in to Windows itself.

 

My personal favorite is Mini Tool Partition Wizard, which has a free version which is the link I've given.  You should always take a full system image backup of your current system to an external backup drive before adjusting existing partitions on a drive.

 

Partition Wizard makes it very easy to resize partitions within the full amount of space you have if you've made one partition too small and another too large.  See the examples at their website.  I believe one of them is very similar to your situation with the exception of encryption, which is not really relevant, per se.

 

 

Ok I d/loaded the latest version. But when I click the "Partition" tab at the top, all the functions including re-size are inaccessible?



#14 RolandJS

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Posted 20 February 2018 - 03:15 PM

Download and install MiniTool Partition Wizard version 9.x -- that one contains "live options" of everything you need.


"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#15 Mick10

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Posted 20 February 2018 - 03:38 PM

thanks for the suggestion. I d/l'd version 9.1 and 9.0 - both have those functions turned off






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