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BIOS Issue


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#1 spenca57

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 04:28 PM

I am trying to boot into a live system of Linux from my Lenovo Yoga. Every time I boot from the USB a panel pops up that says "secure boot prohibited booting from usb" or something of that nature. When I access the BIOS I am unable to change the majority of the settings, I can only change the user pass and date and time. I took my computer to my local GeekSquad and was told to make sure the system software is up to date. I am sure it is up to date, he also mentioned that bitlocker may have caused this issue. I don't use bitlocker and didn't install it on my computer, but decided to search my C:\ drive for "bitlocker" and a lot of random files popped up, many of them saying they were modified last summer, long before I purchased this computer. I have attached screenshots of these files in the file explorer. There were also some event logs which I tried to view however they were merely empty. This is very confusing to me as I do not know hot to proceed with getting a working Linux live system on my computer. I suspect that this may be malware/rootkit or something of that nature, but no AV picks anything up. Any help is appreciated, thanks.

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#2 MadmanRB

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 05:27 PM

Unfortunately if you cannot edit your BIOS you are stuck with windows.

 

If the only thing you can change is your clock and password then you are SOL.

 

I hate it when hardware makers do this crap, screw you lenovo!


Edited by MadmanRB, 15 February 2018 - 05:29 PM.

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#3 Viper_Security

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 05:45 PM

I'm assuming the installed OS is windows? if so boot into it and turn off fast boot then go into bios and see if it gives you a UEFI or legacy BIOS option. if not look through everything in there for secureboot. if it does give you the UEFI or Legacy option select Legacy and USB Emulation to on.

 

When getting a new laptop it is best to Reinstall windows on it as soon as you get it home to prevent things like this.

 

And you could flash your bios to an open source one like coreboot or libreboot but i'd say that is a complete last resort.


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#4 britechguy

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 05:46 PM

What does your BIOS look like?   I find it well-nigh impossible to believe that there is not a mechanism for turning off Secure Boot.


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#5 The-Toolman

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 06:20 PM

Please Remove I Misread Post.


Edited by The-Toolman, 15 February 2018 - 06:24 PM.

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#6 rp88

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 06:26 PM

At present all hardware SHOULD be giving the user a way to deactivate secureboot, microsoft allows vendors to do evil things and sell products where secure boot can't be turned off but I don't think any sellers of non-tablet devices have yet stooped to such lows.

If you try turning off fast boot within windows control panel, deactivate all hibernation options in windows and then restart, quickly tapping on the relevant key (most computers use f1 or f2, without the function key held at the time, but if you stated your exact model number then the exact key to use could be found online). The BIOS should in theory then open, you will probably have to navigate with arrow keys but some types of BIOS/UEFI support mouse use too. Check across the tabs one by one and see what options you have, as well as disabling secure boot make sure to change the boot order to put your USB drive or CD/DVD drive (depending if you are doing a live USB boot or a boot of linux by optical disc. When you leave make sure to save your changes.

I also found a finding at https://forums.lenovo.com/t5/ThinkPad-S-Series-ThinkPad-Yoga/Disabling-Secure-Boot-on-Thinkpad-Yoga-S1/td-p/1794341 suggesting you might need to make other changes in the BIOS to preserve changes you make and ensure secure boot isn't re-enabled. Namely you might need to disable "OS Optimized Defaults" so your changes will be respected.

Another option, probably present, would be to turn on the CSM legacy boot setting, windows will probably not be able to boot at all when this is set, but linux should be able to boot. If you ever want to boot windows again later you would have to turn off the legacy settings and go back to the default modern UEFI type of booting.

Bitlocker, if it is on, will mean that once linux is booted you won't be able to read your hard-drive from within it, as the harddrive will be encrypted by it. But if you want to say goobye to windows you can still install linux onto the drive and wipe away the encrypted stuff, far more sensible would be to, if upon live booting linux you find the hard-drive encrypted, boot windows again and see if you can turn bitlocker off.

Bitlocker or viruses are unlikely to be the cause of your current problem. While updating a BIOS/UEFI might occasionally help these sort of problems if a manufacturer has made changes to improve linux booting since the original BIOS that the machine came with, it can be tricky and very often the fixes made to the BIOS/UEFI are not the kind of thing that helps linux users. The person at geeksquad probably just heard the word linux and got confused from there onwards, then fell back to a script of questions and answers and began on blindly recommending updates* and blaming viruses* without really knowing about the cause of the issue. Be glad you've found this forum, there are real experts here (I'm not one of those top experts, I just know a little bit and try to help where I can) who know all about linux and how to get it working.

*not that some updates don't fix some things, and not that viruses don't cause many problems, but your problem doesn't sound like either

Edited by rp88, 15 February 2018 - 06:36 PM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#7 spenca57

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Posted 16 February 2018 - 02:12 AM

Thank you for all the replies! Especailly rp88, your response was very informative and I tried to turn off fast boot and the autohibernate settings from the control panel, yet still am unable to change the secure boot setting in BIOS. I am not sure how I could turn off Bitlocker as I did not install it. I eventually just settled with VirtualBox which is not working all that well so far. Nonetheless, thank you all for the responses!



#8 Mike_Walsh

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Posted 16 February 2018 - 11:09 AM

This is precisely why I won't have anything to do with UEFI. Especially the sort on Windows OEM-vendor supplied machines. Because it insists on making you jump through hoops like this to achieve anything at all.....

 

I ain't a performing sea-lion!  :angry:

 

 

Mike.  :wink:


Edited by Mike_Walsh, 16 February 2018 - 11:09 AM.

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#9 rp88

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Posted 17 February 2018 - 06:34 PM

Post #7 "am unable to change the secure boot setting in BIOS"
Is this because you can't change the settings once you are IN the BIOS/UEFI or because you haven't managed to get to the BIOS/UEFI at all yet? Obviously you can't do a print screen of the BIOS/UEFI or such, but perhaps take a photo with a camera and post that so we can see what you are managing to get to? Don't worry about bitlocker, in the event you have it turned on we can talk about what do to about it (if anything must be done) after you've managed to simply boot a linux USB for the first time on this machine.

Just to check have you ever accessed the BIOS/UEFI on another computer before, or not, just so I can work out whether you have had some prior experience of BIOS/UEFI and booting live linux or whether this (from the sound of it rather temperamental) computer is the first on which you've ever needed to reach the BIOS/UEFI to do a live boot?

For your info a typical BIOS/UEFI screen looks a bit like the image below, but may vary significantly depending on the maker of the BIOS/UEFI and the age of the hardware. Have you yet found yourself looking at a screen like that at all?

https://crocotips.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/enter-bios-8-s1-m1-3.jpg

(If you see them the boot and security tabs are usually the ones to look in, if your BIOS/UEFI looks like that)

P.S. more details of the EXACT model of the machine would help.

Edited by rp88, 17 February 2018 - 06:38 PM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

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#10 NickAu

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Posted 18 February 2018 - 08:23 PM

Have you tried this?



#11 spenca57

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Posted 09 March 2018 - 02:35 AM

In BIOS, I am completely unable to use the arrow keys to move to the majority of the options, most importantly the one that I need to change to be able to boot into Linux. Kali/Parrot don't boot at all, I just get a message saying the current security policy does not allow booting from the device. However, Ubuntu/Fedora do boot, but I can't install either because they can't read the hard drive. Apparently Bitlocker is installed on this computer, I disabled it yet am somehow still unable to read the hard drive to install Linux. Not sure what to do at this point. Could the manufacturer have tinkered with the BIOS somehow and just ended up screwing me? Could there be an admin BIOS password that I (the computer owner who purchased this device brand new) am unable to change? I think the latter may be more likely as I can change the user password in BIOS but not the admin password. 

The exact make and model: Lenovo Yoga 72013IKB



#12 Al1000

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Posted 09 March 2018 - 11:04 AM

Are you certain that it's the arrow keys that are supposed to be used? There are usually instructions on how to navigate the BIOS somewhere on the screen, when you enter the BIOS.

...they can't read the hard drive...


Check that "Fast Startup" in Windows is disabled - even if you have disabled it before, as some Windows updates can turn it back on.

#13 The-Toolman

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Posted 09 March 2018 - 11:17 AM

Sometimes the arrow keys don't work in Bios.

 

Try the U key to move things Up.

 

Try the D key to move things Down.


Under certain circumstances, profanity provides a relief denied even to prayer.

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Inspiration can be found in a pile of junk. Sometimes, you can put it together with a good imagination and invent something.

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#14 Mike_Walsh

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Posted 09 March 2018 - 02:14 PM

@ spenca57:-

 

Try 'PageUp' and 'PageDown'. That's what works in my Phoenix BIOS.

 

I don't think I've ever seen a traditional BIOS that uses the arrow keys. Modern UEFI stuff, I couldn't say. Don't use it myself.

 

-----------------------------------

 

Now then, boys & girls. Question time:-

 

Did I, or did I not, read somewhere that BitLocker is hardware encryption.....not a software type? In other words, because it can encrypt every drive on your system, it's actually run from a dedicated chip somewhere on your mobo?

 

Is this anything to do with what's called the TPM chip?

 

Haven't used Windows for years, as y'all know, so this is a genuine curiosity on my own part. AFAICT, though, this thing doesn't touch your BIOS-type stuff at all.....or does it?

 

 

Mike.  :wink:


Edited by Mike_Walsh, 09 March 2018 - 02:37 PM.

Distros:- Multiple 'Puppies'..... and Anti-X 16.1

My Puppy BLOG ~~~  My Puppy PACKAGES

Compaq Presario SR1916UK; Athlon64 X2 3800+, 3 GB RAM, WD 500GB Caviar 'Blue', 32GB Kingspec PATA SSD, Seagate 'Expansion' 3 TB  USB 3.0 external HDD, ATI Radeon Xpress 200 graphics, Dell 15.1" pNp monitor (1024 x 768), TP-Link PCI-e USB 3.0 card, Belkin PCI USB 2.0 4-port card, self-powered 7-port USB 2.0 hub

Dell Inspiron 1100; 2.6 GHz P4, 1.5 GB DDR1, 64GB KingSpec IDE SSD, Intel 'Extreme' graphics, 1 TB Seagate 'Expansion' external storage, HP HD2300 webcam.

 

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#15 spenca57

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Posted 09 March 2018 - 02:30 PM

Hmm, interesting point about Bitlocker. May make sense as it seems as though now I disabled it in Windows when I boot into a live Linux system I am still unable to read the HD. Also, the issue isn't so much that the arrow keys don't work, it's that the other options in the BIOS menu are grey and even while moving across options with the arrow keys I can't access the majority of options (specifically important ones I need to change to be able to boot into Kali/Parrot). The ones that can be selected are blue and the arrow keys do work to move to them, however they are just trivial options like system time and date and then user password and that's it.




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