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Applying Loctite on laptop screws


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#1 vargint

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 08:33 AM

The outside screws on my laptop are coming loose.  One actually fell off, but luckily i found it.

 

I want to apply some blue loctite to all of them, as it's not something I would want to deal with, especially while traveling, and i don't have that specialized screwdriver.

 

Any tips on how to apply?  The screws are really tiny, and I don't want to overdo it.

 

The best i was able to come up with is to add a few drops to a piece of paper and dip like half the screw into it.


Edited by hamluis, 15 February 2018 - 09:12 AM.
Moved from System Building to Internal Hardware - Hamluis.


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#2 jonuk76

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 09:14 AM

Yes that would do it.  The bottle I've got has a long thin stem nozzle on it for precise application and I usually just put a tiny drop on the thread of the screw and fit it.  Any excess won't stay in the thread but will be squeezed out anyway, if that happens just dab that up with a paper towel.  It only cures in the absence of air.


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#3 rqt

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 09:40 AM

Alternatively use something like a toothpick to transfer a small amount of thread-lock from the paper to the screw (you will get more control over the quantity applied & are less likely to end up with the screw submerged in the thread-lock puddle).



#4 OldPhil

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 10:02 AM

Personally I think it is more than foolish to use loctite, the screw bosses may very well strip out when you have to remove those screws making it near impossible to get them out without a fair bit of damage!  A far better solution is to use a tiny dab of clear silicone, it will hold the screws very securely yet allow removal without damage.


Edited by OldPhil, 15 February 2018 - 10:03 AM.

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#5 mikey11

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 10:07 AM

Personally I think it is more than foolish to use loctite

 

 

agreed....you will regret putting loctite on when it comes time to remove them



#6 britechguy

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 10:36 AM

Screws in any application should be able to hold themselves firmly in place without the use of thread locker.

 

I see that tiny dabs of what I presume are blue Loctite get used by manufacturers these days, but that's pure laziness.  If the screws are torqued sufficiently they should not move in normal use.  And torqued sufficiently in the case of a metal screw in a plastic case does not mean "gorillacized."  Turn it just until it stops firmly then just the tiniest bit more.


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#7 mjd420nova

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 10:39 AM

I can't imagine the look on the next persons face when they strip out the brass insert in the plastic standoff because locktite was applied to the screw.  These things are put together by machine and very precise torque is used to mount those screws  without any thread locker and can be removed easily (if the threads aren't crossed and the head isn't all goughed up)  I can't count the number of inserts I've remounted or re-attached to keep covers and bezels in place.



#8 britechguy

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 10:44 AM

All threaded fasteners, in any application, rely on the slight stretch deformation of the fastener itself, the thing it threads into, or both (when made of the same material) to keep a "death grip" on each other with what can be very, very little torque to cause that stretch - particularly in small and very fine-threaded applications.

 

Thread locker is a workaround for sloppiness.  It's actually great stuff where one cannot rely on a perfect long-term friction fit between two unthreaded surfaces but should be utterly unnecessary when threaded fasteners are used.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

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#9 jonuk76

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 11:40 AM

There are many grades of thread lock from ones where the bond is easily broken with light pressure through to ones where disassembly is going to be near impossible.  Loctite blue IIRC is a medium strength general purpose thread lock - http://www.loctite.co.uk/threadlocking-9150.htm - bond easily breakable with hand tools.

 

It is commonly used in manufacturing including for the small screws used in electronics.

 

My main use of it TBH is in my archery kit, where high levels of vibration over thousands of shots are guaranteed to cause bolts to loosen over time without the use the thread lock.  Aluminium riser and excessively high torque on bolts = stripped threads.  Which needs a helicoil insert to repair.  Thread lock is a good alternative to that.


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#10 OldPhil

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 12:37 PM

Having been on the wrenches as a salt water mechanic for many more years than I like to admit take my tip about silicone, no question loctite has its place but not when it comes to plastic and brass bosses.


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#11 jonuk76

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 01:05 PM

It's certainly not recommended for screwing into plastic substrates, no.


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