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Lacking permissions on the OS drive in Windows 10 1709 clean install


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#1 cm4coc

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Posted 13 February 2018 - 05:49 PM

A while back I upgraded my Windows 7 PC by doing a clean install of Windows 10 1709.  I recently noticed that on the OS drive that if I right click and go to New the only option available there is to create a folder.  I found this applies to most areas on that OS partition save for my user profile folder.  The only place my local admin account is able to change security permissions in these cases is at the root of the OS drive.  I can manually add my user account there with full control and then the right click, new menu displays all the other options available, however attempting to make the changes recursive on the drive fails with many access errors.  If I right click on C:\Program Files\ or any other folder and pull up security permissions all the options to add or remove permissions are grayed out.  I tried logging in with the default administrator account and same thing.  I thought maybe I got a virus or maybe made a change from all my customizing since installing the OS since it was a few days before I noticed this specific issue.  During this time I did however notice being prompted to grant admin rights for most operations I was doing on the OS drive even though UAC is disabled.  Then today I installed Windows 10 Pro 1709 on my wife's laptop from scratch and this is the first thing I checked and it's the same situation.  So what is the deal why do I not have full admin rights on my OS partition in Windows 10?  If I'm a full admin I should be able to do whatever I want with whatever file/folder I want shouldn't I?

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#2 britechguy

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Posted 13 February 2018 - 07:07 PM

No.  

 

The administrator ID, which is (and has been for a while) inactive by default is the only account that can change absolutely anything.

 

Too many people blew away all sorts of things with full (and I do mean full) admin privileges and without User Account Control, on too many occasions, and that's how accounts with admin privilege (that still don't run things with those permissions by default) that require you to elevate various programs to have those privileges when invoked came into existence.

 

One does not play with the hidden files and folders of an OS, even if one can see them.

 

If you suspect an infection of some sort is active, or that you still have the detritus of one that was not completely removed, I recommend you start a thread in the "Am I infected? What do I do?" forum (and reviewing the instructions for doing so, and following them, before posting).


Brian AKA Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

 

     In a modern society where everyone thinks their opinion deserves to be heard nothing annoys me more than individuals who mistake their personal preferences for fact.

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#3 cm4coc

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Posted 13 February 2018 - 08:58 PM

I found an app called Winaero Tweaker that allows you to completely disable UAC.  I disabled in the app, rebooted and I'm in full control again.  I understand why it's there for users who don't exactly know what they're doing, i'm just glad there is a way to completely disable it still.


Edited by cm4coc, 13 February 2018 - 09:05 PM.


#4 britechguy

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Posted 13 February 2018 - 09:07 PM

I can see no point in doing this (and I actually use Winaero tweaker).

 

It seems to me a much wiser move to enable the administrator account and use it on those rare occasions where the massive control you still have as a regular user with admin privileges is not quite enough.


Brian AKA Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

 

     In a modern society where everyone thinks their opinion deserves to be heard nothing annoys me more than individuals who mistake their personal preferences for fact.

         ~ Commenter TheCruyffGurn on the The Guardian website, 8/13/2014

 

              

 


#5 cm4coc

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Posted 13 February 2018 - 10:21 PM

As I mentioned when I logged in with the built in administrator account the same issue of lacking permissions on the OS drive was present.  I've been using Win7 with this full access for many years and XP/98/95 long before that and never had an issue.  I can't stand being prompted for simple tasks like copying a file to a program files folder, or not being able to right click and create a new txt file in a folder on the OS drive.  I realize it may increase the risks if you were to get infected by malware but a risk I'm willing to take I guess.






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