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Question about admin rights


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#1 itm

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Posted 13 February 2018 - 08:24 AM

Hi,

 

I am new to networking, I have been given the responsibility of managing adding/deleting people in active directory (AD); as well as other networking responsibility.

So the manager gave admin rights in AD.

Recently he needed a file off a computer the a user had, that is not here any more, but believed since my windows credentials add admin rights I can log into any ones computer with my windows credentials and fee their files. I do not think this is right (or possible) but this is my question here.

Should I be able to do this with my credentials?

 

Thank you

 



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#2 null__

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Posted 13 February 2018 - 09:06 AM

If you're a user in a domain, you'll be able to log into any computer that's joined to the domain. Since your account is an admin, you'll be able to log into that account be able to retrieve any file that's on the hard drive by going to C:\Users\User_Account.



#3 itm

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Posted 13 February 2018 - 09:11 AM

Okay

Thanks



#4 Kilroy

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 11:47 AM

Depending on how your rights are set up, you may, or may not be able to access the user's files.  You can set up a person to manage AD, but not give them admin rights on all computers.  I use the following batch file all of the time to connect to the C: drive of other computers using the default Administrative C$ share.  The machine does have to be connected to the network for this to work.  This uses the machine Administrator account.  You could use a domain account by changing the /USER:%Machine%\Administrator to /USER:Domain\User replacing the Domain and User with your Domain and User account information.  I prefer using the machine Administrator as it doesn't create additional profiles on the machine and also allows you to connect to machines that are no longer in AD.

 

@ECHO OFF
CLS
NET USE O: /D /Y
SET /P MACHINE="Enter Machine Name: " %=%
NET USE O: \\%MACHINE%\C$ /USER:%MACHINE%\Administrator PA$$Word
EXPLORER.EXE O:\Users


#5 rocking23nf

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Posted 22 February 2018 - 11:19 AM

with admin rights, you don't need to do anything, you don't even need to login to the computers.

 

if the computers IP is 10.0.0.1.

 

from your own computer, start, run, type -->\\10.0.0.1\C$

 

and boom, theres the local drive of that computer.






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