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New Cable Modem, Now IPv6 and I DON'T LIKE IT


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#1 Hans_Gruber

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 05:02 AM

I bought my own modem and afterwards discovered that I now have IPv6 and I hate it.  I don't like the fact that my IP Address is globally unique and that every site I visit has a unique "fingerprint".

 

When I leased a modem from my ISP, the IP Address changed every time the modem quit working right, and so I assumed the IP Address assigned by the ISP was tied to the MAC of the modem.  I assume this is still true.

 

Now I wonder if the ISP creates a separate category of customers that have their own modem and they are the ones that get the IPv6 IP Addresses.  Or what, IDK.

 

What I want to know is how to get an IPv4 Address, and from there if there is a way to get the IP Address to change occasionally. I deeply distrust this whole thing. Please don't clutter the tread with talk about VPN's.  I'm fully aware that this is an option but the use of VPNs is a PITA, I don't do anything that warrants one, when I've used them I've hated them for being clunky and also that some weapons block connections from VPN's.

 

Modem is an Arris SBG6580-2, and yes I'm interested in learning how to hack it, as long as talking about that does not violate forum rules.  It's my modem; I own it, in case that's relevant.

 

I doubt there's a way to tweak the modem into forcing a IPv4 IP Address, but maybe.  Also doubt I'll get anywhere talking to Spectrum Tech Support about getting an IPv4 IP Address. Which leaves either spoofing the MAC on the modem itself and then calling Spectrum to get them to re-recognize the cable modem, or hacking the firmware and spoofing the MAC Address that way, which seems perfectly legal to me since I own it and everything, but then again in today's surveillance climate you never know, so if anyone has any good information on any of the above, or anything I don't know, but should, I'd appreciate it.



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#2 null__

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 10:03 AM

Have you tried talking to your ISP to see if they can change your IP? Chances are they're dual stacked and you just happened to pull an IPv6 address. You should be able to discuss that with them.



#3 Hans_Gruber

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 04:59 PM

Have you tried talking to your ISP to see if they can change your IP? Chances are they're dual stacked and you just happened to pull an IPv6 address. You should be able to discuss that with them.

 

Tech support at Spectrum can barely speak English.  Do you really think that's worth taking my time?  Even if it's a "ISP discretion" situation, have you ever heard of someone being able to call and get their IP Address changed in any way?



#4 null__

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 05:23 PM

It's certainly not going to hurt. The answer will always be no unless you ask. I work for an ISP and if a customer calls in requesting a change of IPs, we'll go ahead and do that for them. I'm guessing that when your modem was activated, they're set to do DHCP and probably have an IPv4 and IPv6 pool. You just so happened to get a v6 address. Can you do a release/renew from within your modem?



#5 Hans_Gruber

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 06:38 PM

It's certainly not going to hurt. The answer will always be no unless you ask. I work for an ISP and if a customer calls in requesting a change of IPs, we'll go ahead and do that for them. I'm guessing that when your modem was activated, they're set to do DHCP and probably have an IPv4 and IPv6 pool. You just so happened to get a v6 address. Can you do a release/renew from within your modem?

 

I don't know and thank you for establishing your "credentials".  I mean no insult when I ask these types of questions, because frequently posters on forums like this post information that they have learned from reading other posts and sometimes they're all wrong.  Sometimes "common knowledge" is incorrect, and I think sometimes that incorrect information is deliberately perpetuated by manufacturers for the purpose of discouraging their Users/Customers from "doing things" they don't want done.

 

I'll call, and try, and report back.  I'll also play with the modem's settings and see if I can do "release/renew".  I do know what that is, so no need to explain it.  I'm also surprised to learn that IPv4 and IPv6 are treated as a single, common pool.

 

On another forum, someone just posted that they believe that IPv6 addresses rotate or change "spontaneously" with no action taken by the User/Customer.  They said that the last few characters change, implying that the beginning of the string of characters remain constant.  My guess for this is because that's where the ISP "company" information and geographical location is stored/indicated.

 

Do you know this to be true? Or false?



#6 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 13 February 2018 - 07:14 PM

 

I don't like the fact that my IP Address is globally unique

 

I fail to see the force of this point since, at the time you use it, any IP address has to be unique to you, whether it be be IPv6 or IPv4. If it wasn't unique you could not be communicated with reliably. Even if an IPv6 address is 'uniquely' yours, which I understand is the case, in most jurisdictions ISPs are required to keep logs of what IPv4 addresses are assigned to which users and when.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#7 Hans_Gruber

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 03:38 AM

 

 

I don't like the fact that my IP Address is globally unique

 

I fail to see the force of this point since, at the time you use it, any IP address has to be unique to you, whether it be be IPv6 or IPv4. If it wasn't unique you could not be communicated with reliably. Even if an IPv6 address is 'uniquely' yours, which I understand is the case, in most jurisdictions ISPs are required to keep logs of what IPv4 addresses are assigned to which users and when.

 

Chris Cosgrove

 

 

The issue isn't limited to the uniqueness of the IP Address, it's that the IP is unique over TIME.  One day?  No big deal. A week?  A month?  A year?  Five years?  I don't like the idea that someone could create some kind of profile of what sites I've visited over the long term.  Personally I think those IP Addresses should rotate every 24 hours.

 

They sell the idea of IP's not being static.  They called them "dynamic".  They charge you extra if you want a static IP.  But the "dynamic" IP Addresses NEVER change, unless the device, i.e. MAC Address changes.  It's a security risk, IMO and one that I don't like due to the nature of my work.



#8 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 08:12 PM

I do not know if it is possible to get an IPv6 address changed for an IPv4 one, I think that is something only your ISP can answer and do anything about.

 

I do think you are being overly concerned about this. Your ISP knows every web-site you have gone to, regardless of your IP address, otherwise you would not have been able to go to those sites. The web-sites know you have been to them. And, as I said above, in most jurisdictions ISPs are required to keep logs of this traffic. You appear to live somewhere on the eastern coast of the Americas. If this happens to be in the USA then your traffic is well recorded already.

 

If you work in a sensitive industry then perhaps you should approach your employer or the company you contract to for their opinion and advice on this matter.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#9 null__

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 12:44 PM

Forgive me for bringing up a "older" topic, but whatever came of this? I'm curious.






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