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BIOS problem


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21 replies to this topic

#16 mjd420nova

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Posted 13 February 2018 - 07:59 PM

I'm still not understanding, when you "turn off" one drive and turn on the other.  Is this through BIOS, the only way when a drive is physically changed or are you disconnecting power to the drive and connecting to another??  I have seen interchangable drive units to fit in a single cabinet mount on the front panel like an optical drive.



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#17 Dave Clark

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 11:00 AM

Hi Davis,

If that were the case how come the HDD's show when I press F8?

 

Dave



#18 Dave Clark

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 11:03 AM

Hi mjd,

 

I have 4 push button switches on the case front which disconnects the power to the HDD

 

Dave



#19 Kilroy

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 01:39 PM

I have 4 push button switches on the case front which disconnects the power to the HDD

 

I'm thinking this is the cause of your issues.  The computer remembers a configuration and then you change it by removing the hardware.  If you set the boot drive to Windows 7 and then remove it, what do expect the BIOS to do?  As far as the BIOS is concerned the drive no longer exists, so it isn't a boot option and is removed.  As soon as you "turn off" a drive your BIOS doesn't know anything about it.



#20 DavisMcCarn

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 02:33 PM

First is the note that you got into this by changing the CMOS battery without inspecting what was set in the BIOS so please make note of what finally works and remember to set them back if you ever do it again!

My thought is that you need to have BOTH drives turned on, get into setup (without booting), and then change the two SSD's to be the first and second boot devices.  Save the setup, turn off one of the drives, and then reboot to test it.


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#21 mjd420nova

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 02:48 PM

This type of switching is hazardous to your hardware.  First to the interface that suddenly sees power, long after any start up sequence has ended, both ends, the drive and the CPU MOBO interface chips get jolted.  Either way, the BIOS knows what you just had for software and is going to fail.  I just leave the things plugged in and interfaced, then I can restart and select which to boot from but will force you to reboot and select the new device.



#22 jonuk76

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 03:02 PM

Is there any particular reason for needing to power down the disk containing the OS you are not using?

 

I use a hot swap bay which may at any point contain one of a number of different disks with different OS's on it (Windows 7, Linux...).  My system is set to boot Windows 10 by default from an internal SSD, but if I want to boot off another disk via the external bay, it's just a case of pressing the boot override hot key (in my case, F11) early in the boot process and selecting the relevant drive.  No problem, and no need to enter the BIOS or change boot order.

 

Most motherboards have a key to override the boot disk without needing to alter the boot order.  MSI seems to use F11, Gigabyte F12, Asus F8 or possibly F12...


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