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Big "vs" Small?


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#1 OldPhil

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Posted 05 February 2018 - 10:29 AM

I posted this here as we all worry about what we will lose when we are hit with a bug or a system failure!  I have a question for the members, does does size matter?  IMO it most certainly does, an old phrase comes to mind "The bigger they are the harder they fall" The bigger the drive the more you lose!  Why do so many put music,photos, cherished memories and more at risk by loading it all to massive drives so it goes poof in one felled swoop!

 

I hope I have given some food for thought toward securing thier data a better way!  Smaller hard drives, and saving you data to external media!


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#2 britechguy

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Posted 05 February 2018 - 11:36 AM

Well, of course if a drive has higher capacity one can put "more stuff" on it and that means "more stuff" to lose.

 

The solution to that is taking backups as regularly as necessary to an external backup drive (or drives if the data is really critical, and storing one of those drives off-site of the machine being backed up [or using cloud-based backup]).

 

I haven't had an internal drive of any size fail with any regularity in the past 30 years (and I did have a 1TB internal drive on a laptop start to "go wonky" recently, but in a way that still allowed me to clone it to its replacement).

 

For those of us who are using laptops or tablets the need to maximize our storage capacity is critical.   I'd never go for multiple small drives.  I consistently backup both full system images and separate user data backups.  That's more protection than most have, and it's a far more certain protection than using smaller capacity drives without any backup is.


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#3 OldPhil

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Posted 05 February 2018 - 11:59 AM

Anything worth saving I pull off onto external media, I just recently started backing up again which I had put off for a long time.  Really the main reason I decided to start again was the massive amount of updates that I would have to go through!  I did a backup on my two laptops as they have recovery partitions, the tower I did a full system image.  Those tasks made me think of all the poor souls with Hugh drives.  My largest drive is a 500g in the small laptop my tower and regular laptop have 250g SSD's.  I cannot imagine how long it takes to do the same functions on a T drive or larger.  So I do stand by small, for most is a much better way to save time and energy going through backing up the big drives then countless hours possibly days of updates!


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#4 britechguy

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Posted 05 February 2018 - 12:48 PM

Phil,

 

        We clearly live in very different worlds as far as what our needs/wants are.   The amount of time a backup takes is generally irrelevant to me as these are done overnight.  It's no slower or faster based on drive size, but actual drive space used, as that's all that gets backed up, but having the extra space if/when you need it is really useful.  That's why my two latest laptops both have 2TB HDDs as their one and only onboard drives.  I also like to allow a HDD to have lots of "breathing space" on it as well as I've suffered through severe sluggishness (long ago, actually) on a machine where a smaller HDD got far too close to full to allow Windows the space it needs during the normal course of events.

 

         If one does incremental backups, which I do approximately every 2 months, on average, for about a year before doing another baseline full system backup, the incrementals are much faster than the initial full system image.  Of course, if I had to restore using incremental backups it would be much slower.  You are going to trade off speed at the backup time or the restore time.  If restore time is critical then it's better to take full system image backups as a matter of course since they're the easiest, quickest, and least likely to have any issues to recover from.

 

         There is no right or wrong answer to "Big" vs. "Small."   One needs to analyze one's own wants and needs to make that decision, and the time for backup or recovery would be way, way down on my list of things to consider.


Brian AKA Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

 

     In a modern society where everyone thinks their opinion deserves to be heard nothing annoys me more than individuals who mistake their personal preferences for fact.

         ~ Commenter TheCruyffGurn on the The Guardian website, 8/13/2014

 

              

 





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