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Is it safe to do a complete reinstall of Win10 on Lenovo G50-80 ?


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#1 EddoX

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Posted 04 February 2018 - 11:09 AM

Lenovo told me that this G50-80E5 would not work with Windows 10. I did not believe them and I upgraded anyway. It worked fine for 2 years, but now I’m having some problems.
 
Bottom Line – I want to erase my HD and start over with a fresh install of Windows 10. I ran produkey and found something I have a question about. Why do I have 2 Windows Product keys?
 
== Produkey results
Internet Explorer          
Microsoft Office Prof 2010 
Windows (BIOS OEM Key)     
Windows 10 Home         
 
Is it safe to quick reformat my C drive and reinstall Windows 10 on this machine? 
 


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#2 JohnC_21

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Posted 04 February 2018 - 11:28 AM

If the computer originally had 8.1 the key is embedded in BIOS. When upgraded to 10 Microsoft provide a digital license stored on their servers linked to your hardware ID. If you reinstall 10 the OS will auto activate once online. That is why you see two keys. During the clean install you do not need to provide a key, simply click next when asked for a key.

 

You can also revert back to Windows 8.1 because the key is in BIOS. It will also auto activate when online.

 

Before the clean install make sure you still have your Office key.


Edited by JohnC_21, 04 February 2018 - 11:28 AM.


#3 britechguy

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Posted 04 February 2018 - 12:02 PM

And if you can't locate your Microsoft Office Key you should be able to extract it using Belarc Advisor.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

     Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.

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#4 pcpunk

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Posted 04 February 2018 - 12:12 PM

 

Lenovo told me that this G50-80E5 would not work with Windows 10. I did not believe them and I upgraded anyway. It worked fine for 2 years, but now I’m having some problems.
 
Is it safe to quick reformat my C drive and reinstall Windows 10 on this machine? 

Lenovo, those crazy kooks lol.  Have you seen their website LOL, what a joke.

 

Yes it is safe once you get all your files off as they will be Formatted over with a Clean install, and suggested as the Upgrades eventually start running bad.

 

Here is britechguys Tutorial


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#5 britechguy

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Posted 04 February 2018 - 12:23 PM

. . . as the Upgrades eventually start running bad.

 

 

 

I honestly don't know why this particular bit gets repeated "as gospel" because, in my personal and professional experience, it definitely is not true.

 

I have had a number of machines that did not run well after upgrading to Windows 10 or after a couple of Windows 10 feature updates, but the majority of those were Windows 7 machines to start with and were what I call "very well used" systems that had not had any ongoing housekeeping done on them.

 

Most of the machines I've dealt with that "have issues" turn out to have been way less than meticulously maintained prior to their upgrades to Windows 10 or during their period of use with Windows 10.

 

For those machines that have had all updates applied and had adequate housekeeping with something like CCleaner (though not the registry cleaner feature) and where the end users of said machines were not "click happy" and constantly getting infections of some sort or another they've all done just fine through the initial upgrade to Windows 10 and all the feature updates since.  The other two laptops in our household both started off their lives as Win8.1 machines and have only arrived where they are today through the upgrade/update process, never a fresh install required or wanted, and they hum along just fine (though a bit slower than my replacement hardware, which is why I got replacement hardware to begin with, and that's because they use AMD A6 and A8 APUs.  The A12s with 12GB of RAM are, of course faster).


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

     Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.

             ~ Brian Vogel

 

 

 

              

 


#6 EddoX

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Posted 04 February 2018 - 04:23 PM

Hello britechguy,

I'm going to read your instructions next.  I have several problems I hope to eliminate but doing a clean install.  We'll see if it's worth the effort.  

 

One quick question. Do I need to backup my drivers and reinstall after I reinstall Windows?  Some drivers are Intel and some are Lenovo.  Will Windows find what it needs or should I not rely on that idea. 

 

I thought your handle meant Bright Chicago Guy.  I live here in Chicago. 



#7 britechguy

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Posted 04 February 2018 - 04:34 PM

Edward,

 

           If you've got your user data backed up and have all the media (or downloads) for your third party programs I would just do the completely clean reinstall.  Windows 10 is light years better than it was at its introduction at having the correct drivers since most of the driver writers have submitted the correct ones to Microsoft's driver library by now.  If you have issues you can always go to the support page for your computer and download those for the things you are having issues with.

 

           britechguy is a portmanteau of parts of Bri the Tech Guy, and everyone knows where the Bri comes from.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

     Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.

             ~ Brian Vogel

 

 

 

              

 


#8 pcpunk

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Posted 04 February 2018 - 09:30 PM

 

. . . as the Upgrades eventually start running bad.

 

 

I honestly don't know why this particular bit gets repeated "as gospel" because, in my personal and professional experience, it definitely is not true.

 

I have had a number of machines that did not run well after upgrading to Windows 10 or after a couple of Windows 10 feature updates, but the majority of those were Windows 7 machines to start with and were what I call "very well used" systems that had not had any ongoing housekeeping done on them.

 

Most of the machines I've dealt with that "have issues" turn out to have been way less than meticulously maintained prior to their upgrades to Windows 10 or during their period of use with Windows 10.

Isn't that exactly what we are dealing with here, at least the Upgrade part Two Years ago?  I can only assume it was well used within that two years.


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#9 britechguy

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Posted 04 February 2018 - 10:10 PM

By "well used" I do not mean used well.

 

My systems get quite a workout.  I would not describe them as "well used" but as "used well".   "Well used" systems are, put bluntly, anything from a bit unstable and messy to tottering on the brink of collapse as their constant states.  They're silicon quicksand.

 

Building upon quicksand is a recipe for failure.


Edited by britechguy, 04 February 2018 - 10:11 PM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

     Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.

             ~ Brian Vogel

 

 

 

              

 





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