Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Is one bad sector of HDD cause to hit panic button?


  • Please log in to reply
23 replies to this topic

#1 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat


  • BC Advisor
  • 6,986 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:11:38 AM

Posted 02 February 2018 - 06:11 PM

Topic header pretty much sums up the question, have one bad sector (pic below). :)

 

No BSOD's or anything, even Speccy says it's good. It's been a long time since I've had a really bad HDD & was like clusters across a then whopping 60GB HDD of the IDE days. Am curious as to whether I should just watch it for now, and replace if gets worse. The WD tool couldn't repair the sector, tried three times. Just my opinion that it's not a serious issue for now, am seeking a second one, the WD RE4 is a workhorse HDD, this one, purchased new in 2012 from Newegg, has been in no less than 10 computers & the only one out of several or the same model with a bad sector, a couple over the 17-18K runtime mark. 

 

Here's the pics, to include SMART data by HD Tune, and Speccy snapshot below these. 

 

26BalHW.png

 

jYJnaNP.png

 

http://speccy.piriform.com/results/ylpTwP8sNtgYcrld4EBHoyC

 

Otherwise, the Dell Optiplex 780 with Core 2 Quad 9650 is running Windows 10 Pro 1709 like a champ. I ask the question because this has been the first bad sector on a HDD (of my own) that I've seen since the one mentioned early in post above, probably 11 years ago. Those that I did see more recent were of others, and like my old one, scattered all over the drive, or in clumps. Of course, there's no hope for these. 

 

If opinion calls for it, could place in backup duty to make the drive last longer, where not ran a lot. 

 

Any opinions are greatly appreciated. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 SleepyDude

SleepyDude

  • Malware Response Team
  • 2,963 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portugal
  • Local time:04:38 PM

Posted 02 February 2018 - 06:17 PM

Hi,

 

Use the Western Digital diagnostic tool, in the end it should give you the option to "repair" the bad sector by using one of the spare sectors on the drive.

 

From time to time you have to check the drive, if more bad sectors start to pop-up then the drive is definitively going down...


• Please do not PM me asking for support. Post on the forums instead it will increases the chances of getting help for your problem by one of us.
• Posts in the Malware section that are not replied to within 4 days will be closed. PM me or a moderator to reactivate.
• Please post your final results, good or bad. We like to know! Thank you!

 
Proud graduate of GeekU and member of UNITE
___
Rui

 
 


#3 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 55,243 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:10:38 AM

Posted 02 February 2018 - 07:32 PM

Looking at the SMART data...there is nothing to mandate any concern at all.\

 

Bad sectors are a problem for 2 reasons:

 

    a.  Increasing numbers are a sign of a drive/partition problem.  The fact that there are bad sectors...is not abnormal for any drive, including brand new ones.  It's when the numbers are increasing each time that you check...that can be an indicator of a drive problem...or a file system problem.  Generally, a file system problem will also alert users by resulting in NTFS errors.  Bad sector situations that relate to the file system...can be overcome reformatting the drive.

 

    b,  Bad sectors can indicate a mechanical problem with the drive, as opposed to a problem with the NTFS file system.

 

You can use GSMART to get a visual indication of the SMART values, as a double-check.

 

As previously suggested...SeaTools can also be used a reliable check of drive functional status. 

 

Considering the staggering number of sectors on any hard drive...I certainly would not be worried over one or even a few bad sectors.

 

Louis



#4 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat

  • Topic Starter

  • BC Advisor
  • 6,986 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:11:38 AM

Posted 03 February 2018 - 12:15 AM

SleepyDude and Louis, thanks for the advice. :)

 

Just wanted to be double sure, yet will still keep an eye on it. Ran the GSMART test earlier, am running a software that I didn't find until today, DiskFresh. It's running on the affected partition now. Since I backup often, am not worried about major data loss. Here's a snapshot of it's progress, doesn't look like it's going to correct the error. BTW, it's the Data partition that's affected by the sector, accessed more often than the rest of the drive. Kind of odd, at the bottom, shows both drives as RAW, won't be running any tests on those. Some runs DiskFresh rather than the Samsung read restoration tool that's needed for a rushed to market SSD, how I discovered the tool.

 

Oi4o5qn.png

 

Would had been great Microsoft stuck with the long format for HDD's, like that of XP & W2K, it would take several hours to format a 500GB HDD, IMO giving a better foundation for the file system. Yet that's speculation on my part, something that I read elsewhere and started to do here, format the drive and back out at install time. BTW, have done this with a smaller single partition Data drive, turned out well. :)

 

The drive still runs great, speeds are higher than most consumer oriented drives. Only the sequential write was lower than I hoped, with an SSD it should be close to the top number (reads were in line), don't know how HDD's handles this. Will test another PC's data drive to compare. 

 

t7CdDqL.png

 

May wipe & reformat after the next backup, it's getting due for a scrub anyway, generally I wipe HDD's once yearly & secure erase SSD's every six months. On the latter, it really shows, the secure erase makes the SSD a lot snappy, Can't really tell with a HDD, just like to wipe old data, because these quick formats used now doesn't. 

 

Thanks for the responses & reassuring that all is OK. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#5 Havachat

Havachat

  • Members
  • 1,013 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sleepy Hollow - Geelong - Go Cats.
  • Local time:01:38 AM

Posted 03 February 2018 - 05:49 AM

i used to mark the problem sector as BAD , then no Data would be wtitten to it again.

This was years ago and cant remember the last time i checked a drive anyway.

 

Anyway some info for reading purpose only....

https://superuser.com/questions/61899/will-reformatting-my-hard-drive-fix-bad-sectors-on-it



#6 SleepyDude

SleepyDude

  • Malware Response Team
  • 2,963 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portugal
  • Local time:04:38 PM

Posted 03 February 2018 - 07:06 AM

Hi,

 

I'm not familiarized with that DiskFresh tool. The WD tool will make the bad sector "disappear" for sure by using one of the spare sectors the drive have.

 

AFAIK only the tools provided by the HDD manufacture will do that.


Edited by SleepyDude, 03 February 2018 - 07:33 AM.

• Please do not PM me asking for support. Post on the forums instead it will increases the chances of getting help for your problem by one of us.
• Posts in the Malware section that are not replied to within 4 days will be closed. PM me or a moderator to reactivate.
• Please post your final results, good or bad. We like to know! Thank you!

 
Proud graduate of GeekU and member of UNITE
___
Rui

 
 


#7 DavisMcCarn

DavisMcCarn

  • Members
  • 730 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:11:38 AM

Posted 03 February 2018 - 09:08 AM

Most people don't realize that the drive manufacturers (WD, Seagate, etc.) just assemble a bunch of parts that were made by other subcontractors and the bulk of troublesome drives, these days, are due to an issue with one of those parts.  If a given model has a high failure rate, which part is substandard becomes known and can usually be found at sites like HDDGURU and/or a search for that model number gets numerous hits from data recovery firms.

Regardless, the fact that HDTune reports a bad sector does not bode well for the health of that hard disk drive and, especially in light of the fact that these things tend to deteriorate rather rapidly once they have begun to fail, I would be cloning it to a different drive before it got worse.

If (!!!) you have everything backed up and you are prepared for it getting worse, go ahead and leave it; but, be warned that it may fail completely as I write this or it may be several more months before that happens.


Computer dinosaur, servicing PC's since 1976

#8 JohnC_21

JohnC_21

  • Members
  • 22,595 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:11:38 AM

Posted 03 February 2018 - 09:13 AM

I must be lucky because I have old drives that have sectors marked bad that I have been using for years and thousands of hours of run time. I tend to agree with Louis. One sector marked bad is nothing to worry about unless the pending sector count increases rapidly. 



#9 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat

  • Topic Starter

  • BC Advisor
  • 6,986 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:11:38 AM

Posted 03 February 2018 - 08:57 PM

Most people don't realize that the drive manufacturers (WD, Seagate, etc.) just assemble a bunch of parts that were made by other subcontractors and the bulk of troublesome drives, these days, are due to an issue with one of those parts.  If a given model has a high failure rate, which part is substandard becomes known and can usually be found at sites like HDDGURU and/or a search for that model number gets numerous hits from data recovery firms.

Regardless, the fact that HDTune reports a bad sector does not bode well for the health of that hard disk drive and, especially in light of the fact that these things tend to deteriorate rather rapidly once they have begun to fail, I would be cloning it to a different drive before it got worse.

If (!!!) you have everything backed up and you are prepared for it getting worse, go ahead and leave it; but, be warned that it may fail completely as I write this or it may be several more months before that happens.

 

+1! :)

 

And not let's forget how Newegg & others packaged OEM HDD's until a couple of years back, now WD ships these to resellers in secure fitting boxes with end caps on each end of HDD to prevent damage This was my first ever WD RE4, purchased new on the Newegg site, the warranty expired just months back. Came to me in a dented box & drive was wrapped in brown paper with foam peanuts on top. :P

 

So figure end part of this on the reseller and delivery service end also, I know to be fact that if small packages 'falls' from a pallet in UPS hubs, some employees kicks these around, totally ignoring the glass symbol on these. May explain why the dent was on side of box. FedEx, who Newegg uses more these days, are more careful with package handling. 

 

I presume due to the high RMA rates of these drives, prompted WD to package these better, even if sold as OEM or 'bare' drive. Have some still quite good 1TB Samsung HD103SJ HDD's that were reverted to backup usage, these were properly packaged in a plastic container before I knew of the RE4, got one from both Newegg & Amazon. The latter one was on it's way when the infamous 'drive shortage' that never was caused HDD pricing to double & then triple took place. By the time it was halfway here, the $49.99 HDD was $99.99, had to double check to prevent what I thought to be an overcharge or typo. That action would end up imploding in the HDD OEM's faces, as that's when the SSD industry came together with a price war, many turned to these, the rest is history. Corporations are not exempt from reaping what they sow. :P

 

A true shortage, as were many items during the Great Depression & both World Wars, are when folks had to stand in line for days to get what's available. Instead, one could still get these in the same amount of time, only at a jacked up price. This also helped many eBayers sell their used models fast with only a modest price increase. 

 

As far as my data goes, backup quite often to protect against not only drive failures, also Malware/Ransomware protection (as denoted in my sig), with items of high importance on more than one drive, so could survive a drive failure. A quote from the link which Havachat posted above. :)

 

 

 

Ideally with the cost of storage now, just replacing and using a new drive seems ideal to me.

 

That's how I feel about it, and don't cheap out with drive replacement, was purchasing WD RE4's, now it's their Gold models instead, with SATA-3 & minimum 128MB cache. Some models has 256MB cache and may be helium filled, have two of the 2TB models in usage now. Storage is another area of we get what we pay for, be it HDD or SSD. Many, to include members of my family, have asked me, 'why the stockpiling of drives?', Would always reply with the same response, 'I never know when these are needed'. :P

 

As long as things doesn't get worse, will leave the drive as is, or may swap into a less used PC with exact model/size of drive, have at least four of this size, and three of the 1TB capacity. It was simply the first time I've seen a single sector become bad, unlike SSD's, these aren't shifted to a reserve area where unseen & being on the top row concerned me.

 

Thanks for all of the responses received, I believe the issue to be resolved for my comfort zone. :)

 

BTW, here's the link for the DiskFresh tool, on down the page a bit, also provided below. Free for Home users. Some prefers this over the crappy patch that Samsung released for the 840 EVO lineup of SSD's. This didn't affect my 120GB model, although did the 250GB one badly, the one in this machine. So when read speeds diminishes, will try running DiskFresh first. Yet it doesn't repair bad sectors no more than the Samsung read restoration utility 'fixes' the 840 EVO read issue, it's just that some owners are reporting a better experience with this tool instead of what Samsung provided. Some also says that it prevents 'software rot', an issue brought to my attention by Leo Notenboom, founder of the 'Ask Leo' site, the fast formatting style of today would seem to compound the issue. Only most of us doesn't hang onto the same Windows or other OS install for 5+ years anymore before reinstall or moving to another OS. :)

 

http://www.puransoftware.com/DiskFresh.html

 

Download DiskFresh For Home Users 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#10 The-Toolman

The-Toolman

  • Members
  • 1,050 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:10:38 AM

Posted 03 February 2018 - 09:05 PM

I must be lucky because I have old drives that have sectors marked bad that I have been using for years and thousands of hours of run time. I tend to agree with Louis. One sector marked bad is nothing to worry about unless the pending sector count increases rapidly. 

Yup I have a drive that has 219 bad sectors on it for 3 years and never changes.

 

I'm using it just to see how long it will last although like a Timex watch just keeps on going.

 

I do backup anything I add to it daily just in case.


Edited by The-Toolman, 03 February 2018 - 09:06 PM.

Under certain circumstances, profanity provides a relief denied even to prayer.

(Mark Twain)

 

Inspiration can be found in a pile of junk. Sometimes, you can put it together with a good imagination and invent something.

(Thomas Edison)


#11 MadmanRB

MadmanRB

    Spoon!!!!


  • Members
  • 2,603 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:No time for that when there is evil afoot!
  • Local time:11:38 AM

Posted 04 February 2018 - 05:24 AM

Bad sectors are not in themselves a sign of disk failure, but it certainly doesnt help.

One bad sector is nothing though, now 983184 bad sectors? get it replaced!

 

Dont make Vegita say it!

 

Vegeta-PNG-HD.png


You know you want me baby!

Proud Linux user and dual booter.

Proud Vivaldi user.

 

ljxaqg-6.png


#12 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat

  • Topic Starter

  • BC Advisor
  • 6,986 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:11:38 AM

Posted 05 February 2018 - 05:36 AM

Bad sectors are not in themselves a sign of disk failure, but it certainly doesnt help.

One bad sector is nothing though, now 983184 bad sectors? get it replaced!

 

 

 

983184 bad sectors, the drive will be imaged & then nuked with DBAN, after that will carry to a friend, his way of destruction is one of the best. WARNING: Safety Goggles are a must! :)

 

Secure to a tree with duct tape and unload a dozen high powered hollow point bullets in it, the ones that 'ping-pongs' once penetrated. All that'll be left are scraps to gather! :P

 

I wouldn't clone such a drive, because this will carry it's problems to a new one, imaged and restored is best. Better yet, transfer the main folders to an external, which will include sub-ones (which I do with Linux /home folders), and after formatting the new or replacement drive, copy back over. Still, an image is better than not having it, and most of the time, as long as there's no data corruption on the old drive, easier to restore. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#13 MadmanRB

MadmanRB

    Spoon!!!!


  • Members
  • 2,603 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:No time for that when there is evil afoot!
  • Local time:11:38 AM

Posted 05 February 2018 - 05:39 AM

I only mention it as I had a hard drive with that exact number of bad sectors, from my fathers (now dead) laptop

 

https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/602432/bad-sector-bonanza/


You know you want me baby!

Proud Linux user and dual booter.

Proud Vivaldi user.

 

ljxaqg-6.png


#14 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat

  • Topic Starter

  • BC Advisor
  • 6,986 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:11:38 AM

Posted 07 February 2018 - 08:49 PM

MadmanRB, am shocked that the utility indicated the the drive was still OK! :lol:

 

That's just under 17,000 sectors under a Million total, the HDD is just 50% larger than mine in capacity. Does a drive have to be knocking on death's door to be declared bad? :hysterical:

 

If that were mine, would had been used for target practice long before developing that many. Have friends who loves to target practice at bad drives for kicks, just to see how many it takes to shatter the platters. Those hollow point bullets that ping-pongs around once penetration is made doesn't discriminate at anything, be it soft (as in hunting), or a solid surface. Once made, there's no method of data recovery possible, and we all leave some personal details behind that's hard to totally wipe. 

 

In fact, once purchased a refurbished PC with a 'wiped' drive, MiniTool Power Data Recovery Wizard recovered the entire drive, to include what I wanted, the recovery partition. This allowed me to recover the PC to out of the box condition, the only caveat being that Vista Business was installed. :P

 

Oh, and told me a lot about the previous owner, a male who was unfaithful to his spouse, some would had cashed in on that opportunity by demanding a payment in exchange for the drive or tell all. That's why physical destruction of drives (degaussing & shredding) are mandated by many industries, even if the drive is toast.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#15 pcpunk

pcpunk

  • Members
  • 5,473 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida
  • Local time:11:38 AM

Posted 08 February 2018 - 09:17 PM

If you are really concerned in the drives being unrecoverable, just pull the disk out and pound it out a little with a hammer.  These things are fragile enough that you won't recover anything after a little hammering.


sBCcBvM.png

Created by Mike_Walsh

 

KDE, Ruler of all Distro's

eps2.4_m4ster-s1ave.aes_pcpunk_leavemehere

 





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users