Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Faulty power supply replacement, considering Cosair 450W for Lenovo K450e


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 Measure for Measure

Measure for Measure

  • Members
  • 36 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:07:12 PM

Posted 31 January 2018 - 12:42 AM

Troubleshooting suggests I should try replacing the dubious power supply that came with my Lenovo K450e. (Admittedly the motherboard might be wonky). I'd like to know if I'm choosing a workable power supply replacement.

Misadventures with intermittent soft booting described here. Speccy description of computer here.

The existing system contains the original 250W Liteon. Internet website suggests that recommended PSU Wattage for my system is 231W, which seems to me to be cutting things pretty close. The OEM provided NVIDIA GeForce video card calls for a 300W minimum system power requirement, FWIW.

I'm thinking of purchasing a Cosair 450W, 80 plus Bronze certified with a 5 year warranty. I would buy it from Newegg.com, which has a 30 day return policy albeit with a reasonable 15% restocking fee for opened packages.

In the future I might add a 2nd hard-drive. I won't be upgrading the vid card.

Running Windows 10 Home 64 bit on an Intel i7.


My questions:

Will this work? (Is there anything I need to check to be sure this is the right equipment?)

ATX? EPS? What's that?

Acceptable vendor?

Any advice is appreciated; I haven't replaced a power supply before.
 



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 C0bra

C0bra

  • Members
  • 176 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Canada
  • Local time:11:12 PM

Posted 31 January 2018 - 07:58 AM

The corsair 450W 80+ Bronze isn't a bad choice at all! Your current PSU should be a 280W currently, based on a quick search, so a 450W should be okay. The ATX and EPS is referring to the form factor of the PSU - which is basically size standards. You'll want an ATX, the EPS may not have the proper connectors.

 

Hope this helps!


nIDwkQT.gif

       | IT Service Technician | A+ | Network+ | Gamer | iPhone Expert |


#3 jonuk76

jonuk76

  • Members
  • 2,182 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Wales, UK
  • Local time:02:12 AM

Posted 31 January 2018 - 08:10 AM

EPS usually refers to the 8 pin CPU power connector socket on many newer computers.  It's usually supplied as a 4+4 pin cable which can be split into two for motherboards where there is only a 4 pin CPU power connector.


7sbvuf-6.png


#4 Measure for Measure

Measure for Measure
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 36 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:07:12 PM

Posted 02 February 2018 - 04:48 PM

Maybe I should have purchased a modular or semi-modular model...

 

 

My OEM power supply had a plug with 4 holes. The Corsair does not.

 

So. Do I ship the Corsair back? And look for a model with the proper plugs?  Or do I try to get some sort of adapter? Also, what is this mysterious plug?

 

 

 

Pics:

 

Connector.jpg: This shows the white 4 prong plug, connected to the motherboard. Not shown are tiny letters saying "ATX_12V"

 

ConnectorOldPowerSupply.jpg: Close up of old power supply connector.

 

NewPowerSupplyConncectors: None of them are 4 prong.

Attached Files



#5 jonuk76

jonuk76

  • Members
  • 2,182 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Wales, UK
  • Local time:02:12 AM

Posted 02 February 2018 - 05:33 PM

It's the CPU power connector (aka ATX 12V connector).  The 8 pin cable labelled "CPU" on the Corsair PSU should split into two 4 pin connectors, either of which will plug in place of the P2 connector.  The connector usually "slides" apart into two 4 pin plugs.

 

On newer motherboards, 8 pin connectors have mostly taken over from 4 pin, to cope with higher CPU power demands.


7sbvuf-6.png





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users