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PC left connected to internet?


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#1 blop

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Posted 25 January 2018 - 08:17 AM

Hi

 

I hope I am posting in the correct section.

 

I run Windows 10 Pro on my work PC and usually shutdown before I leave but I didn't get the chance to do so yesterday.

 

As a result, I left a few programs opened such as Outlook, Excel spreadsheets (one of which I usually pass-protect), several programs specific to my role and all three browsers (IE, Chrome and Firefox).

 

The PC's on the company's network and has teamviewer (but need pass before access is granted) and other software such as antimalware/virus/ransomware.

 

Are there any concerns having left it connected to and exposed to the internet / company network for over 15 hours?

 

Are there any reports / programs I can run to see if there's been any remote access / attempts made during this time?

 

 

Thanks

 



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#2 mikey11

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Posted 25 January 2018 - 08:18 AM

it's fine....your worrying too much



#3 C0bra

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Posted 25 January 2018 - 08:45 AM

Do you use a password to log into windows? The PC likely locked itself after some time anyways unless you've changed that setting.


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#4 blop

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Posted 25 January 2018 - 08:56 AM

I probably do worry a bit too much!

 

Yes, the PC will go into a passworded screensaver mode after a certain time.

 

Am I able to determine (in Event Viewer) any untoward activity (very unlikely - such as internal IT admins)?



#5 C0bra

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Posted 25 January 2018 - 09:15 AM

I probably do worry a bit too much!

 

Yes, the PC will go into a passworded screensaver mode after a certain time.

 

Am I able to determine (in Event Viewer) any untoward activity (very unlikely - such as internal IT admins)?

 

If it's a work PC, you likely don't have the permissions available to do the necessary searches (depending on how your IT staff have set things up, of course). If you're really that desperate Event Viewer would show logs of system usage.


Edited by C0bra, 25 January 2018 - 09:23 AM.

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#6 blop

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Posted 25 January 2018 - 10:14 AM

I actually do have permission to access Event Viewer - what IDs should I look out for for access other than myself (remotely or otherwise)?



#7 C0bra

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Posted 25 January 2018 - 10:41 AM

I actually do have permission to access Event Viewer - what IDs should I look out for for access other than myself (remotely or otherwise)?

 

What exactly are you hoping to find? If anything the power logs will be where to look, to see if the PC was awoken from a low power state, but that could be any number of reasons; there could have been a system audit or an update. It's not going to say "John Doe logged into your computer and looked at your email."

 

Your lust to find unauthorized access is not going to get you anything. Hacking a computer is nothing like it's portrayed in the movies. Take a deep breath, stop worrying about it and move on. The only thing that would have happened is a colleague snooped before is went into sleep mode, but you'll never be able to prove that, and that's if it ever even happened. 

 

C'mon man.


Edited by C0bra, 25 January 2018 - 10:43 AM.

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#8 blop

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Posted 25 January 2018 - 11:00 AM

Not overly worried, more trying to learn.

 

It is after all a work PC, but I did have a normally passworded excel file open in the background which contains some sensitive info.

 

More interested more than anything.

 

 

Thanks



#9 C0bra

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Posted 25 January 2018 - 11:17 AM

Nothing wrong with wanting to learn! That's more fun than poking about being worried, that's for sure.

 

In Event Viewer, click Windows Logs, in the left pane, then System, from the left pane again Left-Click System and click Filter Current Log... from there use the pull down at Event Sources and check Kernel - Power Power - Troubleshooter.

 

That should contain the sleep, wake and shutdown logs. Again, don't read into it too much. You're PC may have gone in and out of sleep many times due to audits, updates, etc.


Edited by C0bra, 25 January 2018 - 11:18 AM.

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#10 rp88

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Posted 25 January 2018 - 04:58 PM

Leaving a computer connected to the internet when not in use barely increases risk at all, if someone was going to hack you (and real hackers of the most common malware slinging kind don't want YOU AS A SPECIFIC INDIVIDUAL they want THE EASIEST TARGET THEY CAN FIND) they would be able to do so just as easily when you were at the computer. Leaving the computer connected won't change your risk much, the important thing is to keep the browser up to date (ideally consider moving away from IE and to firefox or chrome if you can), keep an up-to-date antivirus running and apply security updates to the OS when possible.
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#11 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 27 January 2018 - 06:41 PM

I don't think that this has been spelled out in the above posts, so !

 

If a computer is switched on and it has either a LAN or wifi connection to a connected router/modem then it is connected to the internet. This is why it is sometimes called an 'always-on connection' as opposed to those distant and happy days of dial-up. Then you were only connected when you dialed up and disconnected when you finished.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#12 travolta133

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Posted 06 February 2018 - 05:54 AM

Leaving a computer connected to the internet when not in use barely increases risk at all, if someone was going to hack you (and real hackers of the most common malware slinging kind don't want YOU AS A SPECIFIC INDIVIDUAL they want THE EASIEST TARGET THEY CAN FIND) they would be able to do so just as easily when you were at the computer. Leaving the computer connected won't change your risk much, the important thing is to keep the browser up to date (ideally consider moving away from IE and to firefox or chrome if you can), keep an up-to-date antivirus running and apply security updates to the OS when possible.

 

Hi, does the same apply to laptops? especially when they are on hibernate. In fact not go shutdown for many days.



#13 britechguy

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Posted 06 February 2018 - 11:35 AM

 

Leaving a computer connected to the internet when not in use barely increases risk at all, if someone was going to hack you (and real hackers of the most common malware slinging kind don't want YOU AS A SPECIFIC INDIVIDUAL they want THE EASIEST TARGET THEY CAN FIND) they would be able to do so just as easily when you were at the computer. Leaving the computer connected won't change your risk much, the important thing is to keep the browser up to date (ideally consider moving away from IE and to firefox or chrome if you can), keep an up-to-date antivirus running and apply security updates to the OS when possible.

 

Hi, does the same apply to laptops? especially when they are on hibernate. In fact not go shutdown for many days.

 

 

The statement was, "leaving a computer . . ."   Since a laptop is a computer the information applies.

 

When any machine is either asleep or hibernating it is not interacting with the outside world anyway.  During hibernation it is completely shut down.  The only difference between a regular shut down (at least prior to the introduction of the loathsome [to me] "Fast Startup") and hibernation is that the OS system state is written out to disc upon hibernation and reloaded when the machine is powered up again.  A regular shut down doesn't do that.

 

When a machine is asleep it is not active in any meaningful sense of the word and certainly not interacting with the internet whether the connection is there or not (at least under the default settings).


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#14 travolta133

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Posted 07 February 2018 - 01:30 AM

 

 

Leaving a computer connected to the internet when not in use barely increases risk at all, if someone was going to hack you (and real hackers of the most common malware slinging kind don't want YOU AS A SPECIFIC INDIVIDUAL they want THE EASIEST TARGET THEY CAN FIND) they would be able to do so just as easily when you were at the computer. Leaving the computer connected won't change your risk much, the important thing is to keep the browser up to date (ideally consider moving away from IE and to firefox or chrome if you can), keep an up-to-date antivirus running and apply security updates to the OS when possible.

 

Hi, does the same apply to laptops? especially when they are on hibernate. In fact not go shutdown for many days.

 

 

The statement was, "leaving a computer . . ."   Since a laptop is a computer the information applies.

 

When any machine is either asleep or hibernating it is not interacting with the outside world anyway.  During hibernation it is completely shut down.  The only difference between a regular shut down (at least prior to the introduction of the loathsome [to me] "Fast Startup") and hibernation is that the OS system state is written out to disc upon hibernation and reloaded when the machine is powered up again.  A regular shut down doesn't do that.

 

When a machine is asleep it is not active in any meaningful sense of the word and certainly not interacting with the internet whether the connection is there or not (at least under the default settings).

 

 

Thanks for your insightful reply.






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