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Ubutu 16.04 cannot detect wifi


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#1 wseng92

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Posted 25 January 2018 - 05:53 AM

My PC cannot detect wifi. This is the output for 

sudo lshw -class network

Output

seng@wseng:~$ sudo lshw -class network
  *-network UNCLAIMED     
       description: Network controller
       product: BCM43142 802.11b/g/n
       vendor: Broadcom Corporation
       physical id: 0
       bus info: pci@0000:06:00.0
       version: 01
       width: 64 bits
       clock: 33MHz
       capabilities: pm msi pciexpress bus_master cap_list
       configuration: latency=0
       resources: memory:f7200000-f7207fff
  *-network
       description: Ethernet interface
       product: RTL8101/2/6E PCI Express Fast/Gigabit Ethernet controller
       vendor: Realtek Semiconductor Co., Ltd.
       physical id: 0
       bus info: pci@0000:07:00.0
       logical name: enp7s0
       version: 07
       serial: 74:e6:e2:39:02:7c
       size: 100Mbit/s
       capacity: 100Mbit/s
       width: 64 bits
       clock: 33MHz
       capabilities: pm msi pciexpress msix vpd bus_master cap_list ethernet physical tp mii 10bt 10bt-fd 100bt 100bt-fd autonegotiation
       configuration: autonegotiation=on broadcast=yes driver=r8169 driverversion=2.3LK-NAPI duplex=full firmware=rtl8106e-1_0.0.1 06/29/12 ip=192.168.1.9 latency=0 link=yes multicast=yes port=MII speed=100Mbit/s
       resources: irq:47 ioport:e000(size=256) memory:f7100000-f7100fff memory:f2100000-f2103fff

 Do let me know if you need any further information. Thanks a lot.

Attached Files


Edited by wseng92, 25 January 2018 - 06:42 AM.


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#2 cat1092

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Posted 25 January 2018 - 06:04 AM

wseng92, can you give us the output of the inxi -Fx command, you can copy/paste the output from the Terminal if needed in your next post, if can connect to Ethernet. 

 

This will give us more details about your computer so that we may better serve you. :)

 

Some Broadcom wireless cards are a pain to deal with, however there's workarounds for most computers with these. 

 

Good Luck!

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#3 wseng92

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Posted 25 January 2018 - 06:16 AM

wseng92, can you give us the output of the inxi -Fx command, you can copy/paste the output from the Terminal if needed in your next post, if can connect to Ethernet. 

 

This will give us more details about your computer so that we may better serve you. :)

 

Some Broadcom wireless cards are a pain to deal with, however there's workarounds for most computers with these. 

 

Good Luck!

 

Cat

 

Hye, I try install using command 

sudo apt install inxi

but get error

 

Unable to locate package inxi



#4 cat1092

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Posted 25 January 2018 - 06:31 AM

You should be able to simply type or copy/paste inxi -Fx into the Terminal box, no install required for most Ubuntu based distros. 

 

That's the way it's been on all of my Linux Mint/other Ubuntu based ones. You should then receive a box full of output with computer specs. Do not add the 'z' that some uses at end of command, may be a privacy violation. Unlike using Speccy on Windows, your MAC address isn't changed to random values. 

 

If it won't run, maybe someone who has had the same issue will speak up with the solution. :)

 

EDIT: Here's the command to install inxi. 

 

 

sudo apt-get install inxi

 

Source Link:

 

https://www.ostechnix.com/how-to-find-your-system-details-using-inxi/

 

This should get you going. :thumbup2:

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 25 January 2018 - 06:34 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#5 wseng92

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Posted 25 January 2018 - 06:37 AM

Thanks for the command  :thumbup2: .  

 

This is the output for command inxi -FX

seng@wseng:~$ inxi -Fx
System:    Host: wseng Kernel: 4.13.0-26-generic x86_64 (64 bit gcc: 5.4.0)
           Desktop: Unity 7.4.0 (Gtk 3.18.9-1ubuntu3.3)
           Distro: Ubuntu 16.04 xenial
Machine:   System: Dell (portable) product: Inspiron 3543 v: A01
           Mobo: Dell model: 04XW3R v: A00 Bios: Dell v: A01 date: 11/04/2014
CPU:       Dual core Intel Core i5-5200U (-HT-MCP-) cache: 3072 KB
           flags: (lm nx sse sse2 sse3 sse4_1 sse4_2 ssse3 vmx) bmips: 8779
           clock speeds: max: 2700 MHz 1: 2194 MHz 2: 2194 MHz 3: 2194 MHz
           4: 2194 MHz
Graphics:  Card-1: Intel Broadwell-U Integrated Graphics bus-ID: 00:02.0
           Card-2: NVIDIA GF117M [GeForce 610M/710M/810M/820M / GT 620M/625M/630M/720M]
           bus-ID: 08:00.0
           Display Server: X.Org 1.18.4 drivers: (unloaded: fbdev,vesa) FAILED: nouveau
           Resolution: 1366x768@60.00hz
           GLX Renderer: Mesa DRI Intel HD Graphics 5500 (Broadwell GT2)
           GLX Version: 3.0 Mesa 12.0.6 Direct Rendering: Yes
Audio:     Card-1 Intel Wildcat Point-LP High Definition Audio Controller
           driver: snd_hda_intel bus-ID: 00:1b.0
           Card-2 Intel Broadwell-U Audio Controller
           driver: snd_hda_intel bus-ID: 00:03.0
           Sound: Advanced Linux Sound Architecture v: k4.13.0-26-generic
Network:   Card-1: Broadcom BCM43142 802.11b/g/n bus-ID: 06:00.0
           IF: N/A state: N/A mac: N/A
           Card-2: Realtek RTL8101/2/6E PCI Express Fast/Gigabit Ethernet controller
           driver: r8169 v: 2.3LK-NAPI port: e000 bus-ID: 07:00.0
           IF: enp7s0 state: up speed: 100 Mbps duplex: full
           mac: 74:e6:e2:39:02:7c
Drives:    HDD Total Size: 500.1GB (27.1% used)
           ID-1: /dev/sda model: TOSHIBA_MQ01ABF0 size: 500.1GB temp: 38C
Partition: ID-1: / size: 448G used: 116G (28%) fs: ext4 dev: /dev/sda3
           ID-2: swap-1 size: 11.91GB used: 0.00GB (0%) fs: swap dev: /dev/sda2
RAID:      No RAID devices: /proc/mdstat, md_mod kernel module present
Sensors:   System Temperatures: cpu: 50.0C mobo: 27.8C
           Fan Speeds (in rpm): cpu: N/A
Info:      Processes: 242 Uptime: 1 day Memory: 3320.4/7889.2MB
           Init: systemd runlevel: 5 Gcc sys: 5.4.0
           Client: Shell (bash 4.3.481) inxi: 2.2.35 
seng@wseng:~$ 


#6 cat1092

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Posted 25 January 2018 - 06:57 AM

Unlike many of the other Broadcom wireless cards we've dealt with, fortunately yours isn't an early 2000's model (2001-2005), these are the bad ones. 

 

Have you checked for Hardware Drivers under Administration, there's a possibility it could be there. May as well enable the Intel-microcode while there, as well as enable latest NVIDIA driver (390.xx) & reboot afterwards (required). This will provide updated CPU firmware to protect your computer from attacks & latest GPU driver installed. Then you need to check for the latest kernel for Ubuntu via the updating system, although note that some can render components inoperable, to include wireless cards. 

 

Finally, once all is updated, may want to poke around & see if there's a hidden switch for wireless. In Live mode, prior to or during install, did it work? 

 

Somehow or the other, we're going to nail this issue down, your computer is too new for wireless not to be working. :)

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 25 January 2018 - 07:00 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#7 wseng92

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Posted 25 January 2018 - 07:12 AM

My PC actually can detect wifi connection, but it stopped working yesterday. Not sure what could be the issues

Show you the output for  /etc/network/interfaces

auto lo
iface lo inet loopback

auto eth0
iface lo inet dhcp

Edited by wseng92, 25 January 2018 - 07:32 AM.


#8 wseng92

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Posted 25 January 2018 - 07:20 AM

I read  this post but have no idea how to  turn off the secure boot

https://askubuntu.com/questions/770490/broadcom-wireless-drivers-unclaimed-after-installing-update-16-04


Edited by wseng92, 25 January 2018 - 07:21 AM.


#9 wseng92

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Posted 25 January 2018 - 07:32 AM

I have solved it by follow the above post. Thanks  :bounce:



#10 cat1092

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Posted 27 January 2018 - 01:27 AM

wseng92, great to hear! :thumbsup:

 

I apologize for not being here yesterday, was a bad day & still is. The main thing being, you've pulled off what you needed & thank goodness it wasn't one of those 12 year old Broadcom wireless cards, these are very tricky to install. Also, I noticed this in the answer, many says to leave Secure Boot alone, when in fact may be the root cause of many of today's Linux issues on hardware designed to run Windows 8 or newer (early 2012 to date). :)

 

 

 

Secure Boot is a security standard developed by the PC industry to help make sure that your PC boots using only software that is trusted by the PC manufacturer

 

That's the whole nine yards, the majority of computers are shipped with Windows & Linux isn't trusted by the OEM unless they install it. I've had to disable Secure Boot once to run a GPU, not because the card wasn't UEFI ready, rather the drivers were unsigned. Another time the card wasn't UEFI ready & had to ask for a custom BIOS to flash the card with to make UEFI compliant, was created one to download, all went well. :)

 

As far as Secure Boot goes, I work on computers when able, one of the extra I perform at no charge is disabling Secure Boot, there's others, yet won't get into it, because this Topic isn't the venue. Yet the technology was an attempt for the OEM's to lure users away from Linux (the major distros had & still has to purchase keys at $99 a pop). It's messed up, always has been. If Secure Boot is so great, then why is the 'Am I Infected' like getting longer by the week? It's supposed to prevent Malware from loading at boot, in that case, obviously has failed since 2012 (nearly 6 years back in time). 

 

Thanks for posting that all is now fine & hopefully you'll enjoy Ubuntu from here on out. 

 

Should you have further issues, always feel free to create a new Topic, or if the same here gives further issues, return to this one. :)

 

Good Luck!

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#11 wseng92

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Posted 29 January 2018 - 09:20 PM

No problem Cat, thanks for your help too.Appreciated  :guitar:



#12 Gary R

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Posted 30 January 2018 - 01:22 AM

Just so you know.

 

Secure Boot was introduced to prevent Windows users from being infected by "Bootkit" infections, which re-wrote a computer's MBR (master boot record) as a means of bypassing detection, and to load a kernel level driver "prior" to the OS loading.

 

With the introduction of GPT (Guid Partition Table) partitioning, which is now the predominant partitioning method, there is no longer an MBR to edit, and editing a GPT will make the partition it refers to unbootable.

 

For a pure Linux user (one who is not dual-booting with Windows), there are no real security implications from disabling Secure Boot.



#13 JohnC_21

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Posted 31 January 2018 - 07:44 PM

Just so you know.

 

Secure Boot was introduced to prevent Windows users from being infected by "Bootkit" infections, which re-wrote a computer's MBR (master boot record) as a means of bypassing detection, and to load a kernel level driver "prior" to the OS loading.

 

With the introduction of GPT (Guid Partition Table) partitioning, which is now the predominant partitioning method, there is no longer an MBR to edit, and editing a GPT will make the partition it refers to unbootable.

 

For a pure Linux user (one who is not dual-booting with Windows), there are no real security implications from disabling Secure Boot.

 

Per Microsoft SecureBoot requires UEFI firmware 2.3.1 or higher. MBR disks cannot boot on UEFI firmware unless Legacy or CSM boot is enable in UEFI settings which requires SecureBoot be disabled. Only disks with the GPT partition table can boot from a computer with UEFI firmware with  SecureBoot either enabled or disabled.


Edited by JohnC_21, 31 January 2018 - 07:53 PM.


#14 Gary R

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Posted 01 February 2018 - 01:36 AM

Yes, with Secure Boot enabled, basically all GPT partitions will be subject to a "MD5" type check on bootup (I'm not sure which actual check method is used), and if their checksum doesn't match one of those allowed by the "list" contained in the UEFI firmware, then the boot is rejected.

 

Ubuntu generates a checksum that is "recognised", so generally speaking, most Ubuntu derived distros should not require Secure Boot to be disabled.

 

Though as I said earlier, since Linux has never (in my knowledge) been subject to Bootkit type attacks, then disabling Secure Boot will probably have no real security implications for a pure Linux user.






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