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Can I run Linux Mint w/ 970 GPU?


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#1 frldyz

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Posted 19 January 2018 - 09:13 AM

Can I run Mint on 3 monitors w/ i7 & GTX 970?

 

 

Forgive me if this is a newb. Linux question. But I am a newb. Linux user.

 

I have been playing around with mint on an old computer that I had laying around in the basement. But I'd like to replace my Win 7 with mint on my main computer

 

I'm asking this simple question because I recall reading that getting your graphics card to work w/ mint is a nightmare?

 

I7 4790k

MSI GTX 970 GPU

Gigabyte gaming 3 mobo

16gb Crucial RAM

 

*I'm not a gamer. So why do I have a 970? I thought it looked cool, the color scheme matches my set-up and I have 3 144mhz monitors.

**Why do I have 3 144mhz monitor if I don't game? They were dirt cheap on sale thru newegg.

*** This computer is used ONLY for online browsing. No gaming. No streaming. No movies or netflix. No wifi. No file storage. Youtube, forums, articles, emails pretty much only.

 

Thanks everyone.



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#2 MadmanRB

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Posted 19 January 2018 - 09:47 AM

It should work, the Nvidia drivers go very far back for linux users.

 

Hey my 1060 works like a charm under linux.

 

And mint is usually very good at hardware detection, you still may need to install the drivers but mint usually takes care of it.


Edited by MadmanRB, 19 January 2018 - 09:48 AM.

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#3 frldyz

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Posted 19 January 2018 - 10:24 AM

It should work, the Nvidia drivers go very far back for linux users.

 

Hey my 1060 works like a charm under linux.

 

And mint is usually very good at hardware detection, you still may need to install the drivers but mint usually takes care of it.

Is it as simple as just a normal Mint OS install?
Or do I need to search for special drivers?  


#4 HyperHenry

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Posted 19 January 2018 - 10:47 AM

Try downloading a Mint live disk and test it out before you install it.



#5 MadmanRB

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Posted 19 January 2018 - 10:57 AM

 

It should work, the Nvidia drivers go very far back for linux users.

 

Hey my 1060 works like a charm under linux.

 

And mint is usually very good at hardware detection, you still may need to install the drivers but mint usually takes care of it.

Is it as simple as just a normal Mint OS install?
Or do I need to search for special drivers?  

 

 

 

Yup its dead simple, and there is a driver installer in Mint too.

 

No need to go to nvidia and install its drivers there is a driver installer in linux mint


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#6 pcpunk

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Posted 19 January 2018 - 02:35 PM

It may not be included in 14.04, otherwise known as 17.xx Series in Mint.  Therefore you may need to install it, but if your using 16.04 otherwise known as 18.xx Series in Mint, it will be available in the "Driver Manger"

 

After Installing you would need to immediately open the Driver Manager and install the one suggested, and reboot.\

 

If you should have problems during reboot Before or After Installing Nvidia Drivers read THIS from Linux Mint


Edited by pcpunk, 19 January 2018 - 02:35 PM.

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#7 MadmanRB

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Posted 19 January 2018 - 02:39 PM

Mint 18 is my recommendation as that hardware should work with it.

I see nothing hardware wise to suggest using 17 instead.

 

Besides Mint 17's nearing the end of its lifespan by next year it will be unsupported.


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#8 pcpunk

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Posted 19 January 2018 - 02:53 PM

It was just a warning about 17.xx that some may not know.


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#9 MadmanRB

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Posted 19 January 2018 - 02:56 PM

Indeed, but at this stage unless your hardware doesnt support Mint 18 there are not too many reasons to use Mint 17.

 

Hopefully Mint 19 will be good for those who had issues with the Ubuntu 16.04 based distros


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#10 pcpunk

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Posted 20 January 2018 - 09:40 AM

I see nothing hardware wise to suggest using 17 instead.

Me either, it was a warning not a suggestion.  Some will download 17 Series by accident.


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#11 cat1092

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 06:25 AM

Linux Mint 18.3 fully supports NVIDIA GPU's, there's no need to settle for MInt 17, like AMD users has to. :)

 

Plus you'll have a nice NVIDIA Control Panel once you install the hardware drivers. Be sure to also install the CPU Microcode, this has important security updates.

 

You should end up with a nice rig where you can do whatever desired with your posted specs. BTW, my best CPU is also the i7-4790K. :)

 

Also, you'll need to learn how to partition your drive, depending on if you want to keep your current OS & dual boot as needed (at a minimum, you should image the system if running Mint as the only OS). This way, should you later decide to sell the computer, has more value with Windows installed. Or you may want to revert, some Linux users does within the first few days or weeks. That's why I recommend a dual boot to start out with. 

 

If you post your specs using Speccy, we can better see what you have, as far as drives goes, if the PC is UEFI, a plus, as you don't have to be concerned about the 4 Primary partition limit if GPT & other details that may be of help. Note that some of what you see, such as your Windows COA & IP address, we don't, random data is displayed instead. 

 

We look forward to assist getting you on the right start, I have almost 9 years of Linux Mint experience under my belt. Am not an expert at anything, yet do know the basics, how to install/setup, security (you'll only need to enable once by Terminal code & check once in awhile). No extra security is required, although some Linux users uses or needs it for specific reasons (example, if running a Mail server for Windows computers), the majority needs no extra other than the Firewall. Should be enabled as soon as system is installed & required reboot. 

 

Simply open the Terminal (there's a little black box on the left lower panel of the screen, same as Taskbar on Windows) & type in or copy/paste sudo ufw enable and then hit Enter. You'll be asked for the password you created, type in, note that you won't see the password, this is for your security, and press Enter again. Once complete, the result should be 'Firewall is activated and enabled at startup' or similar wording. That's a critical first step to ensure you're secure. There's other ways to further boost your security via your router, if interested, we can assist there also, just a few settings. :)

 

Yet for now, you'll need to learn the basics of install, how you'll partition will depend on if your have a HDD or SSD (need to allow for more space on a SSD). My Linux Mint installs are having root & Swap on SSD, /home (same as Data on Windows & a little more) on a HDD. The Swap partition is kind of like the Windows pagefile, with 16GB RAM you don't need much, still best to have 512MB for 'just in case'. I still don't know why anyone with 12GB or more needs this, somehow the data doesn't always go to RAM as it should & end on a drive instead. Oh, and the root partition is kind of like OS one, only on Linux, doesn't store user data like Windows, unless running only root & Swap (which is OK for a newbie, yet later you'll appreciate a dedicated /home partition). For the same reason that many Windows users has a separate Data partition, 

 

All of this is why I ask you to post a Speccy snapshot of your system & let us know if you're going to dual boot or run Linux Mint alone. If you dual boot, will have to make some adjustments from within Windows before you move forward, mainly to create space for the install. Unless you plan to run MInt on a separate drive. 

 

Hopefully my post has been of some assistance, I believe you'll truly enjoy Linux Mint, as I did & still do after a span of distro bouncing before finding it in early 2009. :)

 

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Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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