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Which motherboards are the most resilient?


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#1 tantrik

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 05:29 AM

Processor: Intel Core i3-4130 CPU @ 3.40 GHz

Motherboard: Asus H81M-E

Memory: Transcend 2GB DIMM DDR3 1333 MHz (Channel "B")

Undefined 2GB DIMM DDR3 1600 MHz (Channel A)

OS: Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 64 bit


Dear friends,

 

In the last few days my pc suffered terrible “blows” from both non-brand and cheap power supply and ups. First the ups went abnormal, burnt two power supplies in sequence and because of its ‘abnormality’ my pc would ‘hang’ and monitor display would shut down and would return back until a pc reset. Then I bought a new power supply which gave less ‘power’ to the pc, because of that my internal hdd would not function and the motherboard would show hdd failure error on the ‘start screen’ after I power-on the pc. Thereafter, I replaced both the faulty power supply and ups with new ones and currently having no problem.

 

The vendor/seller from whom I bought both the power supply and ups informed me that both defective power supply and ups could burn down a motherboard and good thing my pc possess a branded motherboard which could take all the “blows” from the power supply and the ups and suggested me not to buy unknown-branded and cheap motherboards as they would not have endured the “blows”, might have suffered terrible damage and would have been difficult to claim warranty if the current motherboard was within warranty period.

 

On the contrary, vendors who normally sell cheap and unknown-branded motherboards informed me that all motherboards, both branded and unknown-branded, are made in china, they are practically the same and hence would withstand any kind of “blow”, either from electricity fluctuations or from malfunctioning ups or power supply.

 

I am confused whose information are acceptable and practical. I will be pleased if any one of you could shed some light regarding this abnormal situation that has been encountered.

 

Thanks in advance.

 

 


Edited by tantrik, 18 January 2018 - 05:32 AM.


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#2 rqt

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 07:14 AM

Branded motherboard & power supplies will probably be better designed & have better quality components, so will probably be a little more resilient when failures occur. However this is not guaranteed. 



#3 hamluis

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 07:46 AM

Well...I would never use an "unbranded motherboard", whatever that might be.  I've never seen such...even OEM manufacturer motherboards can be traced to a known manufacturer via a little use of Google.

 

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#4 OldPhil

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 07:54 AM

Simple branded you have recourse unbranded more than likely not.  If you are now up and running why change the board?  Asus is know to have decent quality boards, your  Asus H81M-E being a very low priced basic board kind of proves that point it survived.  It is running IMO just keep on with it!


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#5 ranchhand_

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 08:52 AM

 

vendors who normally sell cheap and unknown-branded motherboards informed me that all motherboards, both branded and unknown-branded, are made in china, they are practically the same

First of all, to arrive at a true assessment it is necessary to understand the business model of each ('branded" and "unbranded"). First...all mobos (motherboards) are extremely complicated and require expensive and dedicated equipment to manufacture. To mass-produce mobos requires a huge amount of capitol, a large facility, equipment and trained employees. Nobody is going to be able to do this out of his garage on week-ends for extra money.

So...whoever does this needs customers, and a lot of them to turn a profit.

There are two (2) types of manufacturers; companies who depend heavily on their well-known brand-name and offer sophisticated extras and options for the consumer who wants the latest and greatest (avid gamers are a large group of these).

And then there are the jobbers. These are the companies who are lesser known to the public, but some are huge and employ hundreds/thousands of employees. They mass-produce "knock-it-out", low-cost boards to large manufacturers of computers such as Dell, Gateway, HP, and others. These boards are what you are referring to as "unbranded", and generally do not have the quality as the others. They cut every corner to save a dime (literally!), so they can supply boards at a low cost to the manufacturer, who orders thousands at a time. Foxconn and Pegasus are a couple of these manufacturers. There is no support, no help and no communication from these companies to the individual purchaser. You are required to go through the computer-manufacturer for any complaints or warranties. So when you go to Costco and purchase an HP new computer with monitor for $350, that is what you are getting. Sometimes quality companies such as Asus, Gigabyte, etc. will produce a lower cost board to compete in the low-price market, but generally the bulk of the orders go to the jobbers. Some of these are in China, but many are in Pacific Rim countries also.

 

If you are really concerned with quality, build your own. Then you are putting your money into quality parts, not the profit-line of two manufacturers. However...you are not going to build one for $350. Only the mass-produced units can come in at that low price. But....that is the quality you are getting, and most people don't care. At that price you can buy another in 3 years when it fails.

Sorry for the long post, but you wanted an accurate answer, so.... :cowboy:


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#6 tantrik

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Posted 19 January 2018 - 12:49 PM

Simple branded you have recourse unbranded more than likely not.  If you are now up and running why change the board?  Asus is know to have decent quality boards, your  Asus H81M-E being a very low priced basic board kind of proves that point it survived.  It is running IMO just keep on with it!

I am not planning to change the motherboard since it is running flawlessly. I was confused about what vendors informed me about branded and unknown-branded motherboards. Vendors here will say anything to sell pc components. I was deceived many times in buying pc components just on the words of the vendors.

On a different scenerio, in my place, there are two asus motherboards available for intel 6th generation processor: ASUS PRIME B250M-D and ASUS H110M-AASUS H110M-A is more cheaper than ASUS PRIME B250M-D. Is there any advantage in buying expensive motherboard for the same generation processor? I never overclock or use any features that would put any motherboard into stress. So for any generation processor would it be sufficient to buy the cheaper motherboard available from a known brand like gigabyte, asus etc? What are the advantages of using an expensive motherboard compared to a cheaper one from the same brand? Is an expensive motherboard more resilient and durable than the cheaper ones?

Thanks is advance.


 



#7 OldPhil

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Posted 19 January 2018 - 03:32 PM

IMO as long as the board is working and suits your needs that is all you need, needs do vary dramatically from user to user.  Most everyone I know is in my estimation way over their needs me included, I have a board that was voted best back in 2012 do I need it No!  I do little to no taxing things on any of my stuff, but I do run a fairly hot processor and 16 gigs of ram and an SSD. 


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#8 hamluis

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Posted 19 January 2018 - 03:49 PM

You are right about that, Phil :). in my case, at least.

 

I wanted to buy a new motherboard...for no particular reason...and I realized that the majority of boards reflect many features that I have no need/desire for.  I think boards (like many newer components when introduced) are oriented toward gamers, which is fine with me.

 

But...I'm no gamer and just don't need a board with all the frills now being used as selling points.

 

Louis



#9 jonuk76

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Posted 19 January 2018 - 04:15 PM


 

On a different scenerio, in my place, there are two asus motherboards available for intel 6th generation processor: ASUS PRIME B250M-D and ASUS H110M-AASUS H110M-A is more cheaper than ASUS PRIME B250M-D. Is there any advantage in buying expensive motherboard for the same generation processor? I never overclock or use any features that would put any motherboard into stress. So for any generation processor would it be sufficient to buy the cheaper motherboard available from a known brand like gigabyte, asus etc? What are the advantages of using an expensive motherboard compared to a cheaper one from the same brand? Is an expensive motherboard more resilient and durable than the cheaper ones?

Thanks is advance.

 

 

I think a "normal" user (as opposed to an enthusiast interested in overclocking etc.)  should base it on whatever has the features and expansion options they want.  There are things to consider like the form factor you want (Mini ITX, Micro ATX, ATX etc.) which cases you can use, and the chipset which determines to some extent what features are available.

 

Taking the Skylake/Kaby Lake processors as you are discussing, then for a simple no frills system, for the lowest cost then the models based on the H110 chipset are the ones to go for.  The H110 supports 2 memory slots, 4 SATA ports, and has just 6 PCIe 2.0 lanes provided by the chipset.  They'll get you up and running, but have limited expansion options.

 

The B250 chipset based models are moderately more expensive, and add extra features (not implemented in all B250 motherboards) like support for 4 memory slots, 6 SATA ports, and it has extra USB ports over the H110 boards. 12 PCIe 3.0 lanes means it can run the newest M.2 PCIe SSD's at full speed.  Most users probably don't need anything more than this.

 

The high end is represented by Z270 chipset based boards, which has yet more PCIe lanes, USB ports, and the ability to run multiple GPU's in SLI mode, and can get a lot more expensive when features aimed at overclockers (higher spec power stages and better heat sinks for example), and faddy features aimed at gamers (RGB lighting, fancy colour schemes etc) are taken into account.


Edited by jonuk76, 19 January 2018 - 04:15 PM.

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#10 OldPhil

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Posted 19 January 2018 - 04:21 PM

My grand son keeps bugging me to put a hot GPU in, he say it would make a great game machine.  It has 3570K chip which again he says is a good gaming chip OCed to 4.4


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#11 tantrik

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Posted 20 January 2018 - 02:55 AM

Thanks everyone for your suggestion. Really appreciate it.



#12 cat1092

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Posted 20 January 2018 - 10:41 PM

tantrik, I posted on here a couple of years back asking if ASRock motherboards are any good, being for the large part a value brand, although they manufacture some high end offerings also. 

 

I had my doubts, so posted here & now am an owner of four of the brand, two 970M Pro3 (AMD AM3+) & two Z97 Extreme6 (Intel 4th gen, Haswell), all are rock solid & have been driven hard, as I'm into overclocking. :)

 

Like the others has stated, all motherboards are of some brand, the only one that I can advise anyone to steer clear of are refurbished Pegatron units sold on eBay. These are of many different brands, retail & OEM, as well as GPU's, way too many bad reviews for me to purchase nor recommend to others. Several months back, a friend brought to me some components to install in his PC, both the GPU & MB were refurbished by Pegatron, just as the warranty expired, he began having BSOD's. He brought it back to me to 'take a look' and there was a leak & bulging capacitors. I don't recall the original brand of the MB, only that it was for 2nd gen Intel (Sandy Bridge) CPU's & installed his i7-2700K already owned. 

 

Had he asked my opinion before spending his cash, would (likely) had have a decent PC. Instead, got burned by acting on what looked to be a 'killer' deal & had to purchase yet another MB, along with a two year SquareTrade warranty this time. 

 

Therefore, you've done good be creating this Topic & asked opinions before doing anything, as I did in the past, and at least three of the responders in this Topic responded to my ASRock question a couple of years back. 

 

Hopefully you've received enough quality advice to move forward. I'm posting so that you'll know that there's members here who knows their hardware, and of my good experience of doing the same as you have. :)

 

Please feel free to ask anymore questions as needed, as that's why we're here. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#13 Mac29

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Posted 22 January 2018 - 06:06 PM

All good information. I'd second jonuk76's comments. If you're dying for some new feature like USB 3.0, etc. etc. filter options based on that. In regard to your original question, I frequently find Gigabyte and Asus mentioned as for rock solid reliability, though some other brands may not fall that far behind.

 

I have a ream of info culled from websites but you know, YMMV. All it takes is one bad part for someone to swear off that company in threads forever.

 

Mac



#14 cat1092

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Posted 23 January 2018 - 06:58 AM

All it takes is one bad part for someone to swear off that company in threads forever.

 

Mac

 

Yes, and to give a one star (or egg) review, often over issues that neither the reseller or OEM has control over, such as rebates and slow shipping times, neither of which are about the product. :(

 

Anyone who does a lot of frequent purchasing of any items over the Internet knows that rebates are slow to arrive, if ever. Plus if one wants fast shipping, usually must pay for it. Because of the nature of all electronics, we all may receive a DOA component from time to time. As long as the seller has a good RMA process and honors it, there's no call in leaving bad reviews prior to the replacement item arriving and working perfectly, or neutral because the work had to be performed twice. Reviews should reflect the final outcome of the component, keeping in mind that the driver CD will often be outdated, usually there'll be updated ones on the site. 

 

I rarely install MB drivers from the setup CD, rather download the latest from the OEM to a USB Flash drive w/out anything else on it, and all in folders to easily identify. The auto setup CD will also install a bunch of unwanted software that'll have to later be updated/removed if the option 'run setup' is chosen, which by default will install much of the same bloatware as a new, out of the box computer. On my first build, made this mistake and never will again, fortunately had a backup image taken before any drivers were installed and took less than 20 minutes to secure erase the SSD & revert to the backup. This is an often overlooked step when either building a new computer, clean install or reinstalling OS, a backup image should be created after initial install, after drivers are installed, after Windows Updates are complete, along with Office if there's a license. These three backup images should be retained for as long as one owns the computer. 

 

After this, comes the install of our favorite security & software choices, a security scan and a final short term backup. Once complete & running, should be imaged regularly, preferably weekly, although I realize that some may not perform as often, still monthly at a minimum. If the latter option is chosen, just before Patch Tuesday is a great time, as that's when things may go bezerk. Plus before a new W10 upgrade, if that OS is the one installed, I don't have faith in the rollback option that has a known chance of failing to return to prior state, have had a couple of these to mess up something. Not that I needed this function for myself, just tested to see how things would go. When working for others, the chance of an unsuccessful rollback is much higher, usually not having a backup & they want to keep everything 'as was'. 

 

I suspect in the case of the latter above, there may had been issues with the previous install, while I've had a couple to turn out bad out of over a dozen rollback attempts, around or over half is way out of line. As noted in my sig below, maintaining backups on a regular basis can get us out of many jams in short order. Given the all time lows in backup drive pricing (many can assemble their own USB 3.0 external from a SSD upgrade for under $10 if 2.5" drive), or can purchase a 1TB bare drive on promo and metal based enclosure (plastic ones causes the drive to run hot) for a total of $75. 

 

So by taking it carefully, imaging the drive along the way while taking a break, one can have a successful outcome with most any healthy MB, be it a OEM one bundled with PC, or retail model in a custom build. I speak from experience, since my first one that was quite expensive (over $1,700 in components), enter with more confidence with each new build. :)

 

Don't forget perhaps the most important component, the $5 anti-static wrist strap and use it. Simply place & secure the band around the wrist and attach to metal part of the case with included alligator clip, the least amount of static can fry components. If by chance it's in the way in one position, try another. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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