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What Do I Need to Reflow a GPU on a Laptop?


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#1 F-1DeskLamp

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 09:13 PM

I bought a laptop for parts, and I bought all of the parts for it, but the screen doesn't work.

I'm going to invest in a hot air gun. 

What kind of flux do I need to do the job? 

Also are their any tips that I need to know about what not to do or what to do in order to get this to go right? 

Thanks
 

I bought a laptop for parts, and I bought all of the parts for it, but the screen doesn't work.

I'm going to invest in a hot air gun. 

What kind of flux do I need to do the job? 

Also are their any tips that I need to know about what not to do or what to do in order to get this to go right? 

Thanks


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#2 OldPhil

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 09:27 PM

You do not need anything more than basic tools to swap in a new screen, you can find instructional videos on You Tube that will get you through most anything!  No soldering required!!!!


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#3 F-1DeskLamp

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 09:45 PM

I tried using the VGA port to another monitor to bypass the laptop screen, and it does put out a picture, so I had to assume that it's the GPU.  



#4 OldPhil

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 10:27 PM

What OS is on it.  Most you have have to set up in the graphics section.


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#5 F-1DeskLamp

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 10:38 PM

It doesn't have an OS yet.  



#6 rqt

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 03:59 AM

If connecting an external monitor gives you a display then that suggests that the GPU is OK but that the laptop screen is defective.



#7 DavisMcCarn

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 08:00 AM

Since an external monitor works, there is most probably nothing wrong with the GPU; but, rather a problem with the internal LCD display which could be anything from a bad LCD cable, a loose connection in that cable, a bad backlight or its power supply, or the LCD panel itself.  LCD's absorb light and it is the backlight which provides an even white background so the LCD's can do that.  Often, if it is a backlight problem, you can shine a flashlight at a steep angle onto the LCD and see that the image is actually there but very dark.  Try that.


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#8 OldPhil

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 08:06 AM

I tried using the VGA port to another monitor to bypass the laptop screen, and it does put out a picture, so I had to assume that it's the GPU.  

He did state the monitor did not work.


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#9 DavisMcCarn

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 08:36 AM

"and it does put out a picture,"

He actually said the opposite.  The external monitor did work as in he got a picture.


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#10 OldPhil

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 08:43 AM

His statement is some what confusing saying it put out a picture so the GPU must be at fault.  Was it actually a picture or did the screen merely light up showing it is getting power, is there an image?


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#11 F-1DeskLamp

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 10:07 AM

I'm sorry for the confusion.

I probably need to edit the top post.  

The VGA ported external monitor did not work, and that is why I concluded after other kinds of tests that it is a GPU problem.  

I hope smooths things out.  

Thanks  :)



#12 OldPhil

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 10:13 AM

Try googling the board specs to see if in fact it will send signsl to the port without changing some settings, I watch CD's on my tv from my lap top to do dos I need to change the settings.  Like many things some will do things that others will not!


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#13 DavisMcCarn

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 11:15 AM

Reflowing then, which is what you asked about, is only a temporary fix (30 to 90 days?); but, what you need to do is to shield the rest of the board with tin foil so you don't melt the plastic or loosen other parts and then carefully heat the GPU (or southbridge, depending on the model) so it softens and reconnects the solder balls.  It is board specific so we'd need the part number f the board and the complete model number of the laptop.


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#14 OldPhil

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 02:48 PM

I would pickup a solder sucker to plat safe!!


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#15 mightywiz

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 05:45 PM

I would pickup a solder sucker to plat safe!!

you don't need a solder sucker!

 

you don't need to try a reflow, it's always a temp fix that will fail again!  only way to fix it is to pull the gpu & reball the BGA package and then re solder it to the board.  and then without the proper equipment it still probably not going to work.

believe me I have attempted 100's of xbox 360 reflows & done a few reballs.  and its not worth the time or the money.






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