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What's the Difference between DRAM and SODIMM?


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#1 F-1DeskLamp

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 07:10 PM

Is there any difference?

Also does it matter what frequency you have in the system, or should the frequency of the RAM stick match the mobo?



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#2 Drillingmachine

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 07:45 AM

DRAM is RAM type. SO-DIMM is package type.

 

SO-DIMMs are smaller than "regular" DIMM's so they fit better for laptops and small systems.

 

Frequency should match CPU and motherboard. If it does not, that really doesn't matter that much as memory can easily underclock.



#3 DavisMcCarn

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 08:34 AM

RAM (Random Access Memory) is what has been used by computers since the dawn of time to hold the instructions being executed and the data they are working on.  Its main characteristic is that it forgets everything when power is removed which is why we have a storage device to get the programs out of so we can load them into RAM.

Static RAM (which died in the 1970's) used four transistors per memory location that would lock into a one or a zero when you wrote to it.

Dynamic RAM (which is still what we use today) uses one capacitor and one transistor for each memory location and we charge or discharge the capacitor to make a one or a zero which results in being able to cram a lot more RAM into the same physical chip; but, has the downside that we have to read every memory location on a regular basis or the capacitor will leak to the discharged state.

After that, there are numerous changes in the electronic technology used in RAM which affect its usability in a given system and its speed.

In general, a faster clock speed is an improvement; but, there is also a specified waiting period before we can access a second location after we have accessed the first.  The result is it is those specs which determine the real speed of the memory and a slower clock with a faster cycle time can be faster than a faster clock with a longer cycle time.

For the most part, you can ignore all of what I have just said as long as you get confirmation that the RAM you install is compatible with the PC you are putting it into.

SODIMM (Small Outline Dual Inline Memory Module) is a specification of the dimensions of the memory and is primarily used in laptops and ultra small PCs.


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#4 F-1DeskLamp

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 10:04 AM

RAM (Random Access Memory) is what has been used by computers since the dawn of time to hold the instructions being executed and the data they are working on.  Its main characteristic is that it forgets everything when power is removed which is why we have a storage device to get the programs out of so we can load them into RAM.

Static RAM (which died in the 1970's) used four transistors per memory location that would lock into a one or a zero when you wrote to it.

Dynamic RAM (which is still what we use today) uses one capacitor and one transistor for each memory location and we charge or discharge the capacitor to make a one or a zero which results in being able to cram a lot more RAM into the same physical chip; but, has the downside that we have to read every memory location on a regular basis or the capacitor will leak to the discharged state.

After that, there are numerous changes in the electronic technology used in RAM which affect its usability in a given system and its speed.

In general, a faster clock speed is an improvement; but, there is also a specified waiting period before we can access a second location after we have accessed the first.  The result is it is those specs which determine the real speed of the memory and a slower clock with a faster cycle time can be faster than a faster clock with a longer cycle time.

For the most part, you can ignore all of what I have just said as long as you get confirmation that the RAM you install is compatible with the PC you are putting it into.

SODIMM (Small Outline Dual Inline Memory Module) is a specification of the dimensions of the memory and is primarily used in laptops and ultra small PCs.

 

You really know your stuff.  Hehe

 

The RAM stick fits the laptop slot, so it is SODIMM.  I get it. 

Thanks






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