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System partially unresponsive to mouse clicks.


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#1 Cawi

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Posted 16 January 2018 - 01:01 PM

Good afternoon.

My issue is basically summed up in the title. The circumstances are quite odd, I believe, so please bear with me as I detail them at length.

 

A few hours ago, I was using my computer as usual, Windows 7. No new hardware or new software installed, and sudenly my system became partially unresponsive to my mouse. I rebooted, but the problem persisted.

 

Now, I know it's not the mouse's fault because I've already connected the mouse in a different USB port and the problem remains the same: the system still responds to the mouse clicks under certain circumstances. For example: when I turn the computer on, the task bar and the desktop icons are completely unresponsive to mouse clicks. However, if I ctrl+alt+del and open the task manager, the task bar will become responsive again, while the desktop icons will also become responsive but will act strangely: every time I left click on them, the options bar drops down, as if I had right clicked the icon. The system remains completely unresponsive to right button clicks.

 

Every software in my PC is also only partially responsive to mouse clicks, but, unlike the task bar, their situation does not improve with ctrl+alt+del. Let me talk about Google Chrome as an example:

 

Any page I visit is 100% responsive to my left button clicks and 100% unresponsive to my right button clicks. The browser's interface itself is 100% unresponsive to right clicks and only partially responsive to left clicks: I can click on the button to open a new tab and then close old tabs I have, but trying to click on an old tab to switch to it yields no results; Chrome detects the cursor when I hover it over the menu icon (the icon turns darker) but is unresponsive when I click on it; Chrome remains unresponsive if I try to select the url bar, etc.

 

I've already scanned for viruses, but Avast found nothing. Someone in the internet recommended Malware Bytes. I downloaded it as a free trial but the software is unresponsive to left mouse clicks, so it's just sitting here. Someone else also suggested interrupting the explorer.exe process and starting it again, but it didn't work for me.

 

Can anyone help me, please? Thanks in advance.


Edited by Cawi, 16 January 2018 - 01:01 PM.


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#2 hamluis

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Posted 16 January 2018 - 06:00 PM

I would try a different mouse.

 

Louis



#3 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 16 January 2018 - 06:01 PM

 

I've already connected the mouse in a different USB port and the problem remains the same:

 

This in fact suggests strongly that your problem lies with either your mouse or the mouse drivers. The only way to eliminate the mouse is to try a different, known good, mouse in your computer, or, to try your mouse in a different computer

 

If a different mouse in your own computer does not show this problem then your mouse is faulty; if your mouse in a different computer works properly then the mouse is good and the problem is almost certainly in the drivers.  

 

To repair the mouse drivers. Click 'Start - Control panel - Device manager'. This brings up a list of the hardware associated with your computer. You will see an entry 'Mice and other pointing devices'. If there is a yellow exclamation mark or a red 'x' against this that is where the problem lies. Click on the '+' sign then double click on 'HID-compliant mouse'.

 

Sorry - you are having clicking problems !  If you can get to Device manager you can use the 'UP' and 'Down' arrows to navigate each entry and then the 'Right' arrow to expand and select the 'HID-compliant mouse' entry then press enter to get to its properties panel. Now you can use 'Ctrl'+Right arrow' to open the Drivers tab. Then use the 'Tab' key to get to the 'Uninstall' button then press 'Enter'. You will get a warning, press 'Enter' to accept it and the mouse drivrs will uninstall. Then re-boot the computer. Possibly the only way to get to a power-off button without any mouse at all will be to use 'Ctrl+Alt+Delete' then the 'Tab' key to highlight the power button on that window and then 'Enter' to shut the computer down.

 

When the computer re-starts fresh mouse drivers will be installed as part of the boot.

 

Chris Cosgrove


I am going to be away until about the 22nd October. Time on-line will be reduced and my internet access may be limited. PMs may not be replied to as quickly as normal !


#4 Cawi

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Posted 16 January 2018 - 09:07 PM

Chris and Louis, thanks for the help.

 

Unfortunately, I have no spare mouse to test. I did, however, connect my mouse to a laptop. It worked perfectly. When I connected it back to my PC, I was surprised to find out it was working correctly once again. No need to do anything.

 

However, this lasted for a few hours. Suddenly, the problem returned. I followed the instructions laid out by Chris, but as I rebooted the PC, the problem was there once again.

 

Right now I don't have access to the laptop (it's my mom's), so I'd like to know if there's anything else I can do other than buying a new mouse?


Edited by hamluis, 17 January 2018 - 08:32 AM.


#5 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 06:11 PM

I hate faults like this !

 

Given that your mouse worked (1) in a laptop, and, (2) for a couple of hours when re-connected to your own computer does not completely rule out your mouse but it can do no harm to look at the relevant USB controller. Go back into 'Control panel - Device manager'  then click on 'USB  Controllers' and it will open up to look something like the one in this image.

 

Attached File  USB controllers.jpg   97.37KB   0 downloads

 

Starting with the first entry which starts 'Standard enhanced PCI . . .' double click on each one in turn. This will open the 'Properties' box and if you click on the 'Advanced' tab it will tell you what it is controlling. If it doesn't say 'Mouse' close the box and try the next controller down the list. When you get to the one that is controlling the mouse clcik the 'Driver' tab and, just as you did for the mouse, select uninstall and any warnings. This uninstalls the drivers for that controller. Re-boot and the drivers will be re-installed on the re-boot. And see if the problem is gone - or not !

 

Chris Cosgrove


I am going to be away until about the 22nd October. Time on-line will be reduced and my internet access may be limited. PMs may not be replied to as quickly as normal !





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