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Linux Market Share


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#16 Gary R

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Posted 23 January 2018 - 11:11 AM

Yes, the thing to remember, is that the very things that attract most of us to Linux, are the very things that repel a lot of people.

 

Windows is successful because the average User can buy it pre-installed. They don't have to have any knowledge about computers, they just buy it from the store, take it home, plug it in, and use it.

 

They're not bothered if they lose their privacy, and/or control over what gets loaded onto their machine, they assume that this is just the price you have to pay to use a computer. Most of the people I know fall into this category, and to be honest their complacency drives me nuts.

 

But then I imagine my desire to keep hold of my privacy, and maintain personal control over my machine, is equally baffling to them, as is my avoidance of all mainstream "social media".

 

I believe that Linux' market share is going to grow, but probably not as much as some of us would like or expect it to. Most of the people I talk to away from the forums, still don't know what Linux is ........ hell, most of them don't even know what an OS is ....... so don't go expecting folk with that kind of ignorance to sudddenly "see the light", because they probably won't.



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#17 britechguy

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Posted 23 January 2018 - 05:10 PM

Yes, the thing to remember, is that the very things that attract most of us to Linux, are the very things that repel a lot of people.

 

 

I believe that Linux' market share is going to grow, but probably not as much as some of us would like or expect it to. Most of the people I talk to away from the forums, still don't know what Linux is ........ hell, most of them don't even know what an OS is ....... so don't go expecting folk with that kind of ignorance to sudddenly "see the light", because they probably won't.

 

Being a computer geek from way back (I got my degree in CS in 1984, about as early as one could get a CS degree and came into the computing world at the birth of the personal computer).  I have worked on punch cards to write programs and spent years as a programmer and DBA in a Unix environment.

 

I don't consider it ignorance that the average computer user doesn't know, in any meaningful sense, what an OS is.  How many people who drive a car know what a serpentine belt, idler pulley, catalytic converter, or myriad other parts central to the operation of the vehicle are?  Most complex technology of any sort exists as a tool for the user to get something done.  They do not, and ideally should not, need to concern themselves about the nuts and bolts "under the hood" which is largely what an operating system is.

 

Linux has gotten far, far, far, far more end-user friendly in the last few years than it was when it first appeared.  That being said, people very strongly like what they're used to even when superior options present themselves, so you can count on a lot of people sticking with "thing X or operating system Y" because it's what they're used to and comfortable with.

 

Learning curves are hard, even for those of us willing to subject ourselves to same repeatedly.  Most people aren't willing to subject themselves to one at all for something that they've already got a tool that suits the task(s) they need it for.  'Twas ever thus.


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#18 Gary R

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Posted 23 January 2018 - 06:04 PM

 

I don't consider it ignorance that the average computer user doesn't know, in any meaningful sense, what an OS is.  How many people who drive a car know what a serpentine belt, idler pulley, catalytic converter, or myriad other parts central to the operation of the vehicle are?  Most complex technology of any sort exists as a tool for the user to get something done.  They do not, and ideally should not, need to concern themselves about the nuts and bolts "under the hood" which is largely what an operating system is.

 

Oh it's ignorance all right, but I agree that it's not an ignorance that's going to affect their usage of a computer as a tool.

 

The point I was trying to make, is the same one you are, most people neither know, nor care, what an OS is, or what it does, so are never going to flock to Linux just because Windows has become more invasive of their privacy.

 

Most are blithely unaware of just how much their online activities are monitored and moniterised, and probably wouldn't care even if they knew.

 

There will be those like myself, who do not like the direction that companies like M$ are intent on travelling, and who are willing to try out the alternatives, but as converts, we're never going to amount to anything more than a trickle. We're never going to be the flood that's needed to markedly increase Linux' market share.



#19 Mike_Walsh

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Posted 23 January 2018 - 06:34 PM

But then I imagine my desire to keep hold of my privacy, and maintain personal control over my machine, is equally baffling to them, as is my avoidance of all mainstream "social media".

Hah. Nice to know I'm not the only one who studiously avoids social media like the plague it is.....nor do I even have the time of day for it. Personally, I've always been of the opinion that it's a kind of 'state-sponsored' placebo for the masses, to keep them occupied and happy with their lot.....

 

 

Yes, the thing to remember, is that the very things that attract most of us to Linux, are the very things that repel a lot of people.

 

 

I believe that Linux' market share is going to grow, but probably not as much as some of us would like or expect it to. Most of the people I talk to away from the forums, still don't know what Linux is ........ hell, most of them don't even know what an OS is ....... so don't go expecting folk with that kind of ignorance to sudddenly "see the light", because they probably won't.

 

...<snip>...

 

...Linux has gotten far, far, far, far more end-user friendly in the last few years than it was when it first appeared.  That being said, people very strongly like what they're used to even when superior options present themselves, so you can count on a lot of people sticking with "thing X or operating system Y" because it's what they're used to and comfortable with.

 

Learning curves are hard, even for those of us willing to subject ourselves to same repeatedly.  Most people aren't willing to subject themselves to one at all for something that they've already got a tool that suits the task(s) they need it for.  'Twas ever thus.

I agree with you, Brian. Simple as that. Those of us who quite happily subject ourselves to the rigours of trying out one new OS or another, besides customizing, altering, changing things, and generally modifying the hell out of our systems must be a special kind of weird 'sub-set' of society!

 

Okay, I admit it; I'm a 'Puppy' Linux 'nut'. I happen to think it's the best thing to happen to older hardware since the invention of sliced bread.....but I'm savvy enough to realise that, despite being a wonderful little system for those willing to maintain it (it's more 'hands-on' than many), it's not one I would recommend to newcomers to 'the game'. I make this quite clear to many folks, reading between the lines as to their true desires (and insofar as possible, their capabilities), and very often recommend Mint to such as these.

 

I do think that Linux usage will slowly but steadily continue to grow, as more and more individuals become disenchanted with the constant breakages & upsets that Redmond continues to subject them to. To me, Linux is logical, and easy to understand, whereas Windows is anything but. Frankly, to my way of thinking, the entire Windows infrastructure is a mess.....yet, as you & Gary so rightly point out, the majority of users continue to put up with it because it comes ready installed; and at the end of the day, it's what they know.....and not many have the inclination to learn new ways of doing things.

 

It's human nature to allow oneself to get into a comfortable 'rut'.

 

 

Mike. :wink:


Edited by Mike_Walsh, 23 January 2018 - 06:39 PM.

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#20 JohnC_21

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Posted 23 January 2018 - 06:48 PM

There will be those like myself, who do not like the direction that companies like M$ are intent on travelling, and who are willing to try out the alternatives, but as converts, we're never going to amount to anything more than a trickle. We're never going to be the flood that's needed to markedly increase Linux' market share.

That's fine with me. Less Malware to worry about.



#21 britechguy

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Posted 23 January 2018 - 07:12 PM

 

There will be those like myself, who do not like the direction that companies like M$ are intent on travelling, and who are willing to try out the alternatives, but as converts, we're never going to amount to anything more than a trickle. We're never going to be the flood that's needed to markedly increase Linux' market share.

That's fine with me. Less Malware to worry about.

 

 

Indeed.  The Linux market (as well as a number of others) are far less target rich than the markets for Windows are.  Business markets (and, no, I'm not saying Linux has none of those, but they're generally "back of house/data center) in which Windows dominates are the hacker's treasure trove, regardless of the intent of their hacking.


Brian AKA Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

 

     In a modern society where everyone thinks their opinion deserves to be heard nothing annoys me more than individuals who mistake their personal preferences for fact.

         ~ Commenter TheCruyffGurn on the The Guardian website, 8/13/2014

 

              

 


#22 cat1092

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Posted 23 January 2018 - 11:33 PM

That's fine with me. Less Malware to worry about.

 

 

 

+1! :thumbup2:

 

As long as Linux user share stays below 5%, that'll probably hold true, unless someone gets hold of the Spectre & Meltdown code & targets Linux users of wealth (it's well known that many longtime Linux users has more education/disposable income over their Windows counterparts). However, Linus Torvalds happens to be way ahead of Microsoft in delivering fixes that are looking good and has openly shown (like Microsoft hasn't) that he's pissed at Intel. Linus sugarcoats nothing, is passionate in regards to his work, doesn't fear big name corporations because he doesn't lay in the bed with them & calls things as is, as should be. This happens to be the same Linus that flipped NVIDIA executives a bird in a packed courtroom not many years back. :thumbsup:

 

http://www.zdnet.com/article/how-linux-is-dealing-with-meltdown-and-spectre/

 

I'm happy that as a Linux user, to at least know that someone is proactive (in public & behind the scenes) at their job in protecting it's users & pointing the finger at whom it rightfully belongs. :)

 

Satya Nadella nor Tim Cook has never openly shown a fraction of the backbone towards Intel as Linus has done in recent weeks, primarily because both has close relations with Gordon Moore (yes, he's in it also) & his cronies. Plus Apple depends on Intel 100% for their computing division, so all Cook can do is drop back & take the sack, he has no Plan B, nor did Steve Jobs before he became CEO. On the other hand, Microsoft's partners uses both Intel & AMD CPU's, so has more leeway & should be ripping Intel just as hard as Linus is in public, yet Nadella has been fairly quiet through this troubling time. Other than threatening various security vendors to get their act in gear, in regards to being able to deliver security patches, when he should be venting these threats towards Moore & his corporation instead. After all, Intel began this crap & had no intention of notifying the public except via security bulletins that few understands nor cares about. The main problem.....Google found out, as well as a hard working university student who was openly told the issue was to remain secret. While I credit him, at the same time, this is more proof of a conspiracy, cover up, whatever one wants to call it, Intel's CEO isn't the POTUS & has no authority to issue an executive order. The student should had taken it to the government instead, where the matter would had been acted on sooner. And if they ignored him, then the media, all of the networks would had paid huge for his findings, to be the first to 'spread the word'. Since he had no knowledge that it was 'top secret' until speaking with Intel officials, wouldn't had committed a crime, rather be the next TIME (major publication) 'Man of the Year'. :)

 

https://www.theverge.com/2018/1/11/16878670/meltdown-spectre-disclosure-embargo-google-microsoft-linux

 

As far as future Linux growth goes, while I feel there will be an upwards tick on the computing side, it's already showing most everywhere else. Does 'Alexa' ring anyone's bells? Unless one's not an Amazon fan, maybe all hasn't heard, it's a simple round device, connected to the Amazon Cloud (powered by Linux), and you can ask her 'what's the weather like?' and she'll tell you. Of course there'll be questions to which she'll reply 'I don't have the answer to that' (or words to that nature), yet at a relative's home with a new one I told her 'Alexa, see you later' & she replied 'Have a great afternoon'. :thumbsup:

 

If this were a Mac/Windows device, would had cost (guessing) $200 minimum. Since Amazon doesn't use their software in the the Echo (I don't like to call Alexa that, because she sounds so sweet :P), these can be sold at ultra low prices. Some has these throughout their home, and via Alexa can control various things, a simple example is not getting up to flip light switches. Without Linux, a lot of these newer technologies that doesn't bear the names Apple & Microsoft wouldn't be possible, rather wild dreams. There's even a female robot (Sophia) that's been proclaimed the first female citizen of Saudi Arabia, developed with open source technology. She caught one big name talk show host off guard with her calm demeanor, smooth answers, seemed to be engaging in conversation just as a human being. There was one question to which she replied that her 'hard drives weren't communicating', yet she did respond. :)

 

So for all of the naysayers out there, Linux is far larger than many thinks it to be, even if only on a minority of consumer based computers. One huge example, if Linux were to go down, the three exchanges that affects us all (NYSE, NASDAQ & S&P 500) could crash. We'd potentially see another repeat of 'Black Monday' that took place in 1987, although there's safeguards that's since been put in place. Yet note that the tragic day wasn't caused by technical failure, rather market correction. Some if the images of that day were very disturbing, legit multi millionaires leaping from skyscrapers will forever be in my head, we were watching live from work. Yet that's only part of the exchanges duties, when these type of events takes place, we're affected directly, by price inflation, layoffs, potential disruption of services & a whole lot more. Therefore, the financial markets has to be powered by robust operating systems that Mac or Windows cannot provide, neither are secure enough for the task. Linux fills the slot & keeps the World's financial markets flowing smoothly. :)

 

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