Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

During boot I get "RAID Option ROM Version 3.3.1592.22"


  • Please log in to reply
31 replies to this topic

#1 pcpunk

pcpunk

  • Members
  • 6,115 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida
  • Local time:10:19 AM

Posted 09 January 2018 - 06:54 PM

Just installed Windows 10 Version 1709 to this pc, and am getting this during Boot.  I'll leave a pic.

 

The pc boots fine after that but this is irritating.  I don't know enough to use Ctrl-F and the RAID Settings.  I did find this Manual.

 

I wonder if I created One Logical Drive would I still see this at Boot, or will I always see this Option?

 

Ka4dXL2.jpg

 

Thanks, pc

 


sBCcBvM.png

Created by Mike_Walsh

 

KDE, Ruler of all Distro's

eps2.4_m4ster-s1ave.aes_pcpunk_leavemehere

 


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat


  • BC Advisor
  • 7,018 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:10:19 AM

Posted 10 January 2018 - 04:53 AM

Maybe it was a driver that was installed? 

 

Sometimes, OEM's provides the RAID driver for those who wants it (optional), although many doesn't need it. Especially with the emergence of fast SSD's, it's no longer needed to combine two HDD's to have a fast drive. Consumer based drives doesn't make good RAID ones either, won't hold up the same way drives created for the job does. 

 

A quality RAID setup requires costly hardware, this looks to be more of a software type, similar to what Intel Rapid Storage Technology provides. There could had been an outside chance that the previous owner used RAID & the MBR of the drive wasn't reset, this can be done with a partitioning tool. The option will usually be to the left of the partition software window & may require a reboot to complete, unless performed on another computer. 

 

You can likely go into the BIOS (or UEFI) & disable the RAID option, selecting AHCI instead. Here's a couple of solutions for you to try. :)

 

https://triplescomputers.com/blog/uncategorized/solution-switch-windows-10-from-raidide-to-ahci-operation/

 

https://samnicholls.net/2016/01/14/how-to-switch-sata-raid-to-ahci-windows-10-xps-13/

 

BTW, my Optiplex 780 MT was shipped in RAID mode, never understood why with a single 80GB HDD. Dell says it's for 'maximum flexibility', while I didn't see what you do above, there was something to do with RAID in the Device Manager, yet sure as heck wasn't getting RAID speeds. So when swapping for a SSD, changed to AHCI in the BIOS, and reinstalled the OS using the Recovery Manager, this fixed the issue. Although if the same drive is intended to be reused, can follow articles like the above to disable RAID at the OS level, then at reboot, make sure under Storage that AHCI is selected & the message should be gone. 

 

The only other thing that comes to mind, is the HDD & optical drive connected to a PCIe card, rather than the native SATA onboard connections? That can also lead to the message, if so, card should be removed & connected to the MB, yet still will have to make other changes as outlined in the above & other articles. read Post #8 below. The same fix that applies to 8.1 should do the same for Windows 10. Am certain that this can be disabled at boot. 

 

http://www.overclock.net/t/1227636/how-to-change-sata-modes-after-windows-installation

 

Can you provide a Speccy snapshot of the computer in question? :)

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 10 January 2018 - 05:22 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#3 jonuk76

jonuk76

  • Members
  • 2,180 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Wales, UK
  • Local time:03:19 PM

Posted 10 January 2018 - 07:41 AM

It's possible the HDD controller is in RAID mode.  Typically you have the option in BIOS to switch the controller between IDE, AHCI and RAID modes.  IDE mode is older, for compatibility purposes, while AHCI is the default on modern systems.  You can try changing it to AHCI - the worst that will happen is it won't boot.  EDIT - or follow the guides Cat helpfully linked to above ;)


Edited by jonuk76, 10 January 2018 - 07:44 AM.

7sbvuf-6.png


#4 pcpunk

pcpunk
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 6,115 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida
  • Local time:10:19 AM

Posted 10 January 2018 - 11:19 AM

Thanks guys, would love to get this fixed!  I wonder if putting Windows 10 on One Primary Partition was the culprit?  Instead of having that little System Reserved partition also.

 

This is a new Drive Cat, not the one that came with it.  I fix this later today guys, thanks again!!!


sBCcBvM.png

Created by Mike_Walsh

 

KDE, Ruler of all Distro's

eps2.4_m4ster-s1ave.aes_pcpunk_leavemehere

 


#5 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat


  • BC Advisor
  • 7,018 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:10:19 AM

Posted 10 January 2018 - 03:32 PM

pcpunk, you need that system partition for various reasons, one being able to perform automatic repair if needed, or to roll back to the last version if a feature upgrade causes issues. Like a Linux Swap partition, the ESR partition is unformatted (16MB with clean install). 

 

Unless you truly need an extra partition for whatever reason (you can always add another drive for other uses), all of the default Windows 10 partition created should remain intact, if clean install, should be 3 total. May be 4 after a new feature update, a small one at right end of partition table. 

 

Like any other OS, it's best to have the proper partitioning scheme for Windows 10 and if needed, add drives for Data & others OS's. You can also shrink the C partition (if a large drive) to create a Data partition, Most all of my W10 'C' partitions are 80-120GB in size, can then create whatever Logical partitions needed.

 

Like jonuk76 is saying above, it's very well possibly the HDD controller is in RAID mode, as was my Optiplex 780 MT when arrived. When adding SSD, was fixed to SATA/AHCI mode. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#6 pcpunk

pcpunk
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 6,115 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida
  • Local time:10:19 AM

Posted 10 January 2018 - 07:23 PM

pcpunk, you need that system partition for various reasons, one being able to perform automatic repair if needed, or to roll back to the last version if a feature upgrade causes issues. Like a Linux Swap partition, the ESR partition is unformatted (16MB with clean install). 

ArrrgggArrrrgggArrggg, LOL...well I knew I'd mess something up LOL.  I'd seen others do this cat, use only One Primary to install too, is this more so for Windows 7? 

 

I was also thinking I may install Linux on the same drive, so wanted to have plenty of primaries to work with.  This way, no Extended at all, but I guess I'm not thinking properly here?

 

You know, I forgot to check to see if it Installed as GPT, still don't always remember, or follow if this is even possible on old windows 7 machines.  This machine came with windows 7, but there are options for UEFI, so that means it is UEFI Capable right?

 

I also Disabled Fast Boot on this one because it is an old Windows 7 machine, and it's been my belief that this is the best setting for older W7 Machines when Upgraded to 10?  Boot times seem to be "Normal" 1:30min, at least that is what I find to be normal for Windows 10.

 

Now that I have it this way I will wait and see if all goes well with the next Major Upgrades, or, will I need to be proactive and Upgrade Manually, now that I have this partitioned like this?  Seems that I always have to learn the hard way LOL

=====================

Okay guys, it all went well with Setting to AHCI in BIOS, but, still had an issue and got the Window:

"Your pc had a problem and needs to restart, we'll restart for you"

 

Even though I had Reset BIOS to Defaults, the Boot Order Under UEFI Options was set to boot from USB, as I had set it to install Windows10.  So I manually reset to DVD, HDD and then USB or something, rebooted twice to get er all working.

 

Hope that wasn't to confusing, I'm foggy today.

 

Thanks guys, now I can get busy testing this machine out further to see if it is worthy of keeping and using as my main desktop machine.  Very nice for an old HP Tower that's for sure.  Has two front USB ports and Two 3.0 on the top front also.  This tops my Small Form Factor Dell Tower, but I love that little Dell 660s Tower, it runs like a top, takes up little room, uses little power, produces little heat, and that's a big deal here in the South.


sBCcBvM.png

Created by Mike_Walsh

 

KDE, Ruler of all Distro's

eps2.4_m4ster-s1ave.aes_pcpunk_leavemehere

 


#7 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat


  • BC Advisor
  • 7,018 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:10:19 AM

Posted 11 January 2018 - 05:46 AM

 

 

I also Disabled Fast Boot on this one because it is an old Windows 7 machine, and it's been my belief that this is the best setting for older W7 Machines when Upgraded to 10?

 

Fast Boot is normally (although not always) a feature of UEFI machines, of which many AM3+ MB's are, as are all of mine. 

 

If you'll post your system specs as I advised above, we'd all know more about your MB. If UEFI, you can go GPT partitioning & have up to 128 Primaries if needed. :)

 

You'll get a lot more assistance by providing us the information needed, in a faster timespan, so why not provide the Speccy snapshot? It's usually one of the first things we ask of everyone, we can then identify your UEFI/BIOS state. If the PC shipped with Windows 7 & upgraded to 10, and then clean installed, that's legit, the COA becomes converted to a digital license. You can unlock more features with a Microsoft Account, such as Store access (there's many freebies) OneDrive, inbuilt email client, a PIN rather than password & more once this hurdle is cleared, or before, if desired. This action effectively transfers the digital license to you & if you can do GPT, the clean install will be yours, once signed in again. :)

 

For now, we need to establish what you have, so that we can advise on how to set the UEFI (or BIOS) to see your HDD as AHCI or SATA, whichever happens to be in the menu & the new clean install will be as intended if necessary. In the case you don't need to reinstall, can use partition software to recover any deleted ones in many instances, if you've deleted any. Linux will install fine on Logical partitions, yet this isn't the issue here, can be discussed in that section of the Forum.

 

So first things first, let's see what you have and we'll take it from there, we need a starting point to go on. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#8 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat


  • BC Advisor
  • 7,018 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:10:19 AM

Posted 11 January 2018 - 06:05 AM

You can also determine if you have UEFI or BIOS using MSInfo32

 

To do so, open the Start Menu, type Run & should open, then MSInfo32 in the box & hit Enter to get System Information. Look for BIOS Mode, won't be too far below PC make & model. If it says 'Legacy', then you have the old school system (MBR), should it say UEFI, you can (& should) install in GPT mode. :)

 

Yet you must change the drive operational mode first, if UEFI. I don't know why these OEM's sets things to RAID by default, so won't speculate. You'll have to lookup the online manual on how to change these settings, there's usually a way to set to RAID, AHCI/SATA or IDE. This may or may not involve changing more than one setting, maybe two, three at most. Hopefully only one, although if you want the full benefit of UEFI (if there), GPT partition scheme is one of these, may as well bite the bullet now if so, to prevent having to redo all later after everything is set the way you want. :thumbup2:

 

Please keep us informed of progress, we'll do all we can to help. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#9 pcpunk

pcpunk
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 6,115 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida
  • Local time:10:19 AM

Posted 11 January 2018 - 12:19 PM

If you'll post your system specs as I advised above, we'd all know more about your MB. If UEFI, you can go GPT partitioning & have up to 128 Primaries if needed. :)

It was in my first post cat

https://support.hp.com/us-en/document/c03359045

 

http://speccy.piriform.com/results/Gv7bqRxH7ErNyocsRZVp4V7

 

If UEFI, you can go GPT partitioning & have up to 128 Primaries if needed. :)

 

You can unlock more features with a Microsoft Account, such as Store access (there's many freebies) OneDrive, inbuilt email client, a PIN rather than password & more once this hurdle is cleared, or before, if desired. 

Darn, it installed in MBR for some reason, why would it do this guys?  Ahh, I assume because I pre-partitioned it with NTFS.

 

I will try the MS Account cat, as I've been wanting to do that.

 

Another thing I don't understand is, why do I have a "Windows.old" Folder in C: Drive?  This was a Clean Install, and I wiped the Drive with MT Partition Editor, formatted as One NTFS Partition, but I see the Windows.old Folder, really weird.

 

 

You can also determine if you have UEFI or BIOS using MSInfo32

 

That is a quick way of checking cat, thanks for the reminder.  I went to Disk Management first, and checked the partition for mbr or gpt.

 

 

 

Look for BIOS Mode, won't be too far below PC make & model. If it says 'Legacy', then you have the old school system (MBR), should it say UEFI, you can (& should) install in GPT mode. 

 

WHAT! LOL...I thought you were old-school MBR guy cat?

 

1. What about Imaging with GPT, I thought this was harder, or something I remember reading to that effect.  I have imaged my Windows 8 machine, but now thinking about it, need to go back and see what actually was backed up.  I used AOMEI, and tried normal backup and System OS Only Backup also, as far as I can remember.


sBCcBvM.png

Created by Mike_Walsh

 

KDE, Ruler of all Distro's

eps2.4_m4ster-s1ave.aes_pcpunk_leavemehere

 


#10 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat


  • BC Advisor
  • 7,018 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:10:19 AM

Posted 12 January 2018 - 06:00 AM

 

 

Darn, it installed in MBR for some reason, why would it do this guys?  Ahh, I assume because I pre-partitioned it with NTFS.

 

Had you used Rufus for the bootable USB drive, there's an option for UEFI w/GPT partition scheme. If by chance the ISO is larger than 4GB, you can create as NTFS rather than the default FAT32. That's what some members (those who post regularly) has stated, I haven't performed a clean install for a while. :)

 

 

 

WHAT! LOL...I thought you were old-school MBR guy cat?

 

Yes I used to be, this cost me a lot of experience when converting my XPS 8700 from GPT to MBR, have lived & learned. On machines that offers GPT, will always use that option, except for drives that's going to be used for Data and Linux /home partitions. I'll usually make the first a primary, the rest Logical. 

 

Boot drives, unless the computer is BIOS/MBR, have been using GPT exclusively since I got into PC building. :)

 

So what did the MSInfo32 information show, BIOS or UEFI? If UEFI, we need to find out what changes to make there to switch to SATA/AHCI mode. As I understand it, some OEM's uses RAID for greater flexibility, whatever that means, don't see the benefit with a single drive system. Nor if not using the RAID function with more than one drive installed. Some users used to combine two performance drives to have lots more speed, with SSD's now the norm, there's really no need for this for that benefit. There are other uses for RAID, the one just mentioned was once popular among enthusiasts.  

 

What we need is the detailed service manual for your computer (not the quick setup), the precise instructions to make the switch from RAID to SATA./AHCI before install should be there. :)

 

If you can find that & post it, I'll gladly take a peek & see if I can find the setting and advise you on how to proceed. You don't have to do anything with the HDD once this is set & have a W10 install USB in GPT mode, it knows what to do, you'll simply have to delete any existing partitions before proceeding with install. Depending on size of drive (example 500GB), you can make the 'C' partition 100GB & get by fine, W10 doesn't use a lot of drive space. Then if desired post install, you can create a 50GB or so Data (larger if needed), and whatever ones you desire to create. You'll likely never use 128 Primaries, even with a 2TB HDD/SSD installed, so so more worries about 'running out'.

 

Try to find the service manual & provide link (will likely be PDF), when I wake up in a few hours, will check it out. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#11 pcpunk

pcpunk
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 6,115 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida
  • Local time:10:19 AM

Posted 12 January 2018 - 10:21 AM

 

 

So what did the MSInfo32 information show, BIOS or UEFI? If UEFI, we need to find out what changes to make there to switch to SATA/AHCI mode.

BIOS

 

In Post#6 I said this:

 

Okay guys, it all went well with Setting to AHCI in BIOS.

That's all done cat. 

 

Now trying to decide whether or not to reinstall and use GPT or just keep this funky setup how it is.  Trying to think long term, but want to just experiment a little also.  Right now I could just move on and install Linux along side because everything is working fine.

 

Really need to sit down one day and read a good article on Partitioning.  It seems windows 10 creates Four Primary's on a Default Install?  This would not be good for installing Linux.  So the GPT is looking better.

 

I'l also considering using Two Drives, one for Ten, and another for Linux, but that will take more resources, and perhaps create more heat in a machine that is already creating more heat than my previous Dell 660s.

 

Service Manual:

http://h10032.www1.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c03255541


sBCcBvM.png

Created by Mike_Walsh

 

KDE, Ruler of all Distro's

eps2.4_m4ster-s1ave.aes_pcpunk_leavemehere

 


#12 DavisMcCarn

DavisMcCarn

  • Members
  • 895 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:10:19 AM

Posted 12 January 2018 - 10:37 AM

The way I have been installing Windows (since Vista (2007)) is to go into the advanced drive options, delete ALL of the existing partitions and then simply click next letting Windows create what it needs on its own. It has worked flawlessly for me using that method and many of the messed up PC's I see are due to somebody trying to force matters by creating partitions beforehand.

You need to; however, go into the BIOS (F10 on most HP's) and change the controller setting to use AHCI (not RAID) or see if you can remove the RAID controller out of the BOOT Options.


Computer dinosaur, servicing PC's since 1976

#13 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat


  • BC Advisor
  • 7,018 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:10:19 AM

Posted 12 January 2018 - 03:14 PM

The way I have been installing Windows (since Vista (2007)) is to go into the advanced drive options, delete ALL of the existing partitions and then simply click next letting Windows create what it needs on its own. It has worked flawlessly for me using that method and many of the messed up PC's I see are due to somebody trying to force matters by creating partitions beforehand.

You need to; however, go into the BIOS (F10 on most HP's) and change the controller setting to use AHCI (not RAID) or see if you can remove the RAID controller out of the BOOT Options.

 

+1 to All! :thumbup2:

 

 

 

This machine came with windows 7, but there are options for UEFI, so that means it is UEFI Capable right?

 

Yes, you're set for UEFI & GPT partitioning. :thumbup2:

 

As to the solution of how to switch from RAID to AHCI (or SATA) mode, while I couldn't find any instruction in the HP manuals (what a bummer! :ranting: ), did find this article below. Read the very last post for guidance on how to make the change. If you're at all familiar with working in the UEFI, this setting can be found, often under drive operation or storage, yet could be anywhere. Just start from the left side & glance through the options until you fine the one. 

 

https://h30434.www3.hp.com/t5/Desktop-Operating-Systems-and-Recovery/Windows-7-Install-Does-Not-Detect-Hard-Drive-Is-there-a-BIOS/td-p/6174870

 

I believe this is the reason why RAID was chosen by HP, although the PC is UEFI equipped, takes some trickery to install in GPT mode, so chose RAID as a 'safe default'. Dell does the same with many computers, even legacy models, both of my Optiplex 780's came to me this way.

 

I have all of the confidence in the World you can pull this off, if you simply take your time & look carefully through the menus. :)

 

Then you can create a UEFI bootable install drive with GPT partition scheme & should install perfectly, go ahead & choose the size of the C drive,100-120GB (in MB) so that you won't have to shrink later. These will also be aligned correctly for best performance. You'll see as the partitions are created, should say GPT somewhere. It's been a few months since I've performed a clean install with GPT partitioning, but will be in the next 3-4 days (NFL Playoffs are here the whole weekend, real life comes first :P). 

 

I'll first upgrade the PC to W10 using the assistive technologies trick that's about to expire in a few days, then clean install GPT style. Both W10 & Linux Mint MATE x64. Support for W7 is going out, moving up to W10 & signing into my Microsoft Account preserves the digital license, even should I image afterwards & reinstall W7. Of which I also (now) know how do go as GPT also, although didn't at the time of that install. :)

 

You'll get the hang of this once you go though the motions a couple of times, take it easy (patience is a virtue) & let things come to you during the process. Allow this to be a learning one, make notes, take pics, whatever you can do to remember. In other words, you run the PC, don't let it run you! :thumbsup:

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#14 pcpunk

pcpunk
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 6,115 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida
  • Local time:10:19 AM

Posted 12 January 2018 - 08:17 PM

 

 

As to the solution of how to switch from RAID to AHCI (or SATA) mode, 

For the third time, this has been done.

 

 

I'll first upgrade the PC to W10 using the assistive technologies trick that's about to expire in a few days,

This is still available!!! Wow, I did not know that cat?  I see now: January 16, 2018.

 

 

 In other words, you run the PC, don't let it run you! 

Too late for that LOL, This thing got me good LOL.

 

Now I'm going do do another Install just to get back the GPT Partitioning, that's a big mess up for me, rookie mistake, though not the end of the world.  Could run it like this no problem, but I think I would like to experiment with GPT.

 

Thanks guys


sBCcBvM.png

Created by Mike_Walsh

 

KDE, Ruler of all Distro's

eps2.4_m4ster-s1ave.aes_pcpunk_leavemehere

 


#15 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat


  • BC Advisor
  • 7,018 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:10:19 AM

Posted 13 January 2018 - 04:14 AM

 

 

Could run it like this no problem, but I think I would like to experiment with GPT.

 

Really no difference as far as running goes than MBR, you simply get more Primaries, plus the boot file (the same as MBR are stored in more than one place on the drive. Not just that hidden area where one has to use a partition tool to reset MBR after a wipe, to prevent getting the 'grub rescue' error if Linux has been installed & the proper key to boot from USB isn't hit fast enough. It's stored in more than one place on GPT partitioned drives for safety, although like any other, deleted when wiped, still have to get that hidden area. 

 

The other thing being, if you add a second drive for storage only & it's under 2TB, while you can initialize & create partitions with GPT as desired, WD & other OEM's recommends to use MBR instead. Should you need to swap a MBR (non-boot) drive to GPT, you can do so w/out losing data, or vise versa. I've done this several times & have lost nothing. What I don't know is why the same can't be done with a bootable drive, there may be a workaround, yet haven't ran across any, if so, could had saved you a lot of work. :)

 

Nothing there to experiment with, unless you want to create 50+ partitions for the sake of it. What you do get is the convenience of having as many of these as you need, depending on drive space & making Logical partitioning a thing of yesteryear on any computer that ships with Windows 8 or newer, to include many late W7 models. Another thing about the HP you own, the MB is manufactured by Gigabyte (had to read the specs twice to make sure there were no MB swap! :P), so likely better than many of HP's offerings. Since I don't get many (newer) HP's coming my way, is the first time I've seen this, hopefully won't be the last, and not the 'bottom of the barrel' of Gigabyte's offerings. I'd be interested in seeing the overall build quality & features compared to their retail MB's. :)

 

 

 

1. What about Imaging with GPT, I thought this was harder, or something I remember reading to that effect.  I have imaged my Windows 8 machine, but now thinking about it, need to go back and see what actually was backed up.  I used AOMEI, and tried normal backup and System OS Only Backup also, as far as I can remember.

 

No difference at all, drive images works the same way, and no more space required on the external. Although if needed, you will have to create the bootable rescue media just like the OS stick, with Rufus using the same mode. Or if the DVD/CD RW is there, can use that, just slower to load. This is what I like about Macrium Reflect, under 'Other Options', there the choice to create a boot option direct to Macrium to make backup/restore easy. Backups are far less likely to be corrupted running like this & because Windows isn't running, faster also. Restores are just as easy, as long as the menu is bootable, any Linux install won't wipe this out. 

 

 

I'l also considering using Two Drives, one for Ten, and another for Linux, but that will take more resources, and perhaps create more heat in a machine that is already creating more heat than my previous Dell 660s.

 

 

A second drive won't use that much more resources within itself, I have a couple with 4 drives (one a Dell OEM machine). Although you may want to inspect inside of the case very well, there could be a semi hidden place for a intake fan, which many OEM models doesn't ship with. On my XPS 8700, had to run a PWM splitter to control both fans & then use SpeedFan to make these run faster. Was running at 808 rpm steady, now at a predefined curve, all the way to 3,000 rpm if needed & not much louder because I installed silicone washers between fans & case. These are 92mm fans on the Dell. The faster these can be made to run, the more heat that can be pumped out. Same applies to CPU fan. If interested, you can always create a new Topic to discuss this further. :)

 

As noted in the link to the manual you provided, external/internal cleaning is recommended on a regular basis. That action alone reduces heat buildup to a larger degree than many thinks, the lack of doing so are likely the #1 killer of any computer. :)

 

 

Keeping your computer system free of dust, dirt, and heat will prolong its life. Dust, pet hair, and other particles can build up, creating a blanket effect; as a result, components can overheat, or, in the case of the keyboard and mouse, not work smoothly and effectively. Check your system once a month for visible signs of dust and debris, and clean it about once every three months

 

Good Luck with your new HP, I believe you'll be just fine with & enjoy it! :thumbsup:

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users