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Installing Linux Operating System onto a SSD drive?


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#1 defurman

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Posted 09 January 2018 - 01:44 PM

I am thinking of buying a new computer (barebones) because i don't want a Windows OS. Now the manufacturer will supply a barebones computer but won't install a linux distro onto the SSD drive. I want to devote the entire SSD drive 250GB for the Linux operating system. So could someone tell me how this is done please. Big thanks


Edited by hamluis, 09 January 2018 - 03:39 PM.
Moved from Internal Hardware to Linux - Hamluis.


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#2 buddy215

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Posted 09 January 2018 - 01:58 PM

Curious as to who the manufacturer is....and the cost

 

You will need to create an install medium on a flash drive or DVD. That requires downloading your Linux Distro ISO of choice.

Then using one of several install tools. If you have a Windows 7 or later computer you can use its tool.

You can purchase DVDs and Flash Drives to use to install many Linux distros if you have no way to create your own.

 

Installation/FromUSBStickQuick - Community Help Wiki

 

EDIT: if you post back include some specifics for the computer...amount of RAM...description of graphics card...description of CPU...

to start.


Edited by buddy215, 09 January 2018 - 02:06 PM.

“Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded and the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics...you are all stardust.”Lawrence M. Krauss
A 1792 U.S. penny, designed in part by Thomas Jefferson and George Washington, reads “Liberty Parent of Science & Industry.”

#3 MadmanRB

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Posted 09 January 2018 - 02:02 PM

Easy peasy lemon squeezy

 

First choose a linux however if new to linux i recommend linux mint Cinnamon 64bit:

 

https://linuxmint.com/download.php

 

download it and then burn it to a DVD or use a thumb drive

 

I recommend a USB thumb drive as its more reliable

 

on windows use this tool to write the .iso to the USB:

 

https://www.pendrivelinux.com/universal-usb-installer-easy-as-1-2-3/

 

After that assemble your hardware, then watch this handy dandy linux mint install video:
 

 

or if you want something more detailed:

 


Edited by MadmanRB, 09 January 2018 - 02:06 PM.

You know you want me baby!

Proud Linux user and dual booter.

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#4 Mike_Walsh

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Posted 09 January 2018 - 04:49 PM

Hi, defurman.

 

The above two answers will supply you with the nuts'n'bolts of how it's actually done.

 

As to the general difficulty of the procedure, well.....in all fairness, it's no different to installing Linux to a hard drive. Linux sees everything as a 'file' (even the 'mount points' where the individual drive is 'mounted' into the system).

 

I run 10 'Puppies' from an internal hard-drive, and Anti-X from a small, secondary internal SSD. Installing Anti-X was no different from installing my Pups; if anything, it was quicker, despite the Anti-X .iso file being considerably larger.....in large part due to the fact of an SSD being that much faster. But, a rough overview would b:-

 

1 ) Download your chosen .iso file.

 

2) 'Burn' it to a CD/DVD (usually the latter will be needed), or 'burn' it to a USB drive. These have the advantage that you can use 'em again & again; also for other stuff. If you're doing this from Windows, use Rufus; if doing this from Linux, I'd recommend UNetbootin.

 

This creates a 'LiveCD' or 'LiveUSB', which allows you to take Linux for a 'test-drive' first, to see if it and your hardware like each other. If so, then you can run the 'installer' from the 'Live' session. Then, re-boot into your new Linux distro..!

 

If you find there's problems, either ask here on the forum, or try out another distro! Linux is pretty adaptable to most machines nowadays, so you shouldn't have too much trouble. We're always here to help.

 

 

Mike.  :wink:


Edited by Mike_Walsh, 09 January 2018 - 04:52 PM.

Distros:- Multiple 'Puppies'..... and Anti-X 16.1

My Puppy BLOG ~~~  My Puppy PACKAGES

Compaq Presario SR1916UK; Athlon64 X2 3800+, 3 GB RAM, WD 500GB Caviar 'Blue', 32GB Kingspec PATA SSD, 3 TB Seagate 'Expansion' external HDD, ATI Radeon Xpress 200 graphics, Dell 15.1" pNp monitor (1024 x 768), TP-Link PCI-e USB 3.0 card, Logitech c920 HD Pro webcam, self-powered 7-port USB 2.0 hub

Dell Inspiron 1100; 2.6 GHz 400FSB P4, 1.5 GB RAM, 64GB KingSpec IDE SSD, Intel 'Extreme' graphics, 1 TB Seagate 'Expansion' external HDD, M$ HD-3000 'Lifecam'.

 

KXhaWqy.gifFQ8nrJ3.gif

 

 


#5 buddy215

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Posted 09 January 2018 - 05:33 PM

Mouse over defurman

and you will see "I enjoy distro hopping". So, I think he is concerned that installing on a SSD may be different than on a hdd. I'm sure

a distro hopper is capable of creating an install medium and has a distro in mind to install.

 

I don't use an SSD...so anyone who knows of any difference in the two types of installs then that would be helpful to him. I know of no difference.


“Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded and the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics...you are all stardust.”Lawrence M. Krauss
A 1792 U.S. penny, designed in part by Thomas Jefferson and George Washington, reads “Liberty Parent of Science & Industry.”

#6 MadmanRB

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Posted 09 January 2018 - 05:44 PM

Use a SSD here and it works fine with linux, got it dual booting with windows 10 on the same drive and linux treats it like any other drive only difference is that ts much much faster :D


You know you want me baby!

Proud Linux user and dual booter.

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#7 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 09 January 2018 - 07:25 PM

Choose a nice Linux that suits your needs;

 

https://distrowatch.com/


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#8 defurman

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 03:43 PM

The computer i am thinking of buying will come with no operating system. The company https://www.novatech.co.uk does not supply computers with a Linux os. I have in all honesty never used an SSD drive before. I would like to keep this 250GB SSD drive just for the default os which i intend to be openSUSE 42.3 (Leap). Think i'll have a look for any companies in the UK that sell desktop pc's with a linux distro pre-installed. Any help or advice would be really appreciated.



#9 NickAu

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 04:26 PM

The computer i am thinking of buying will come with no operating system

I have in all honesty never used an SSD drive before..

 

Installing to a SSD is no big deal, Boot your PC from a Linux of choice disk and the installer will do the rest.


Edited by NickAu, 10 January 2018 - 04:26 PM.


#10 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 05:03 PM

Using, operating and installing an SSD is exactly like using a spinning hard drive. When I made the switch I did not notice that I had to do anything differently. openSUSE is a fine OS, I have used it extensively.


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#11 JohnC_21

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 07:45 PM

If you want to take the time to learn how to do it I would recommend you install /home on a separate partition. This allows you to reinstall the OS and still keep all your data and settings intact.



#12 defurman

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 06:30 AM

Big thanks to everyone who replied and for the helpful advice.






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