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Windows 7 Cannot access Secondary Hard Drive.


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#1 TRiCKST3R

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Posted 09 January 2018 - 12:41 AM

So I've had an issue that was discussed here: 

 

https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/666323/windows-7-stuck-on-the-windows-loading-screen/

 

 

Windows wasn't able to detect my secondary HD, it appear it BIOS but windows didn't recognize it. I ran a SMART test on the drive and it had an error msg (see picture).

 

I was able to run Ubuntu and tried to back up my drive that way.

 

I wasn't able to access the drive (See Images). So i restarted the computer and CHKDSK prompt for a Check up on one of my drives for consistency. It ran a 10 min check up and loaded up windows normally.

 

Now i can see the drive in "My Computer" but it says: E:\ Is Not Accessible. Access Is Denied. with NTFS in grey just below drive.

 

I try runing CHKDSK on the drive and it says: The Disk check could not be performed because Windows Can't access the Disk.

 

 

 

How can I fix this or am i Screwed out of luck? Did the hard drive just failed and i cannot no longer access it?

 

Is there ANYTHING that i could try to get access to the drive and back up my data?

 

Thanks!!!!

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Edited by hamluis, 09 January 2018 - 10:47 AM.
Moved from Win 7 to Backup/Imaging - Hamluis.


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#2 TRiCKST3R

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Posted 09 January 2018 - 12:54 AM

Disk Management shows this. Any hope?

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#3 hamluis

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Posted 09 January 2018 - 08:34 AM

Everything...including your previous topic..indicates that the drive is failing, IMO.

 

The suggestions/comments made by others in your previous topic...are pertinent.

 

There is an unbelievable assumption by some...that a failing hard drive is something that can be "fixed".  Unless one considers replacing the drive...as a "fix"...there is no "fix" for such situations.

 

Louis



#4 JohnC_21

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Posted 09 January 2018 - 10:18 AM

I think your only chance of recovery is scanning the drive with a data recovery program knowing the scan itself could send the drive into a final failure. Imaging the drive, something I mention later, can also send the drive over the edge. Depending on how important this data is to you a professional data recovery service may be what you want look at but this is very expensive. 

 

There are paid software like Minitools Data Recovery and Easeus Data Recovery. Both allow a small amount of recovery before requesting payment for a license.

 

The free software is PhotoRec, part of Testdisk. The downside to PhotoRec is data recovery is in real time meaning the recovery drive needs at least the amount of free space as the data being recovered. Also, all names recovered are generic with the correct extension. You would need to rename all your files accordingly. 

 

https://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/PhotoRec_Step_By_Step

 

There is a very small chance Testdisk may be able to detect the partition allowing you to recover your files. I would only do the Quick Search to put minimum stress on the drive knowing even the Quick Search could cause the drive to finally fail. Highlight any partition found. Press the "P" key. If you see your files you can copy them to your recovery drive, the drive you unzipped the Testdisk file to.

 

https://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/TestDisk_Step_By_Step

 

Another option you may want to look at is actually cloning the disk to an image file and working on the image file to recover your files. See the below guide. You will need another drive with at least the same size to image the disk to. Once the image file is created you can use PhotoRec to scan the image file, Testdisk to attempt a recovery, or if you are really lucky use OSFmount to mount the image file to a virtual drive, allowing to recover your files with the directory structure and file names intact. Read the guide twice before attempting to create the image file if you decide to go this route.

 

https://html5.litten.com/make-full-image-of-broken-raw-infected-or-encrypted-hard-drive-with-free-tools/



#5 TRiCKST3R

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Posted 09 January 2018 - 11:31 AM

Hamluis, yes I always though that the Hard drive is failing. My main priority was always to save my data.

 

JohnC_21: thanks for your reply. Another person suggested "Stellar Phoenix Windows Data Recovery" to try n recover some data.

I got it on deep scan right now. its been going all night so hopefully this works. If not, I will try and do some suggestions you mentioned. 



#6 britechguy

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Posted 09 January 2018 - 11:32 AM

When it comes down to it, if one is considering one's next step as being professional data recovery, I can't see any reason to not attempt the use of something like TestDisk, PhotoRec, or one of the other utilities mentioned or trying to image the drive to another drive and applying those tools to the newly created image of the failing drive.

 

If the original drive fails it fails.   You're not going to be paying any more for professional services if the drive has failed (unless it were a physical failure like the heads crashing into the platters - highly unlikely).

 

What you're likely losing is your own "residual access" to whatever you can still access on the failing drive.  You're not destroying data if the drive goes completely kaput, just any ability to use DIY tools of any sort to access it.

 

Given the price of professional data recovery services my general approach is to at least try imaging the drive to another and working with that (when possible) or doing a direct recovery from the failing drive to another (when not).   If that doesn't work then you know you must turn to professional services.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#7 TRiCKST3R

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 12:33 AM

Update: So managed to back up all my data with Stellar Phoenix Windows Data Recovery program, it cost me $99 USD but I at least i got my data back.

 

I could have done the image file and try it that way but I saw my files come up and with a push of a button they were being saved, I took the easy way out. 

 

Now to replace both hard drives with SSDs and reinstall windows and load my data back on there. 

 

Thanks everyone for the help.



#8 RolandJS

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 01:08 PM

"...I could have done the image file and try it that way but I saw my files come up and with a push of a button they were being saved,..."  Later on, connect the external HD where the recovered files were saved to the computer, select some from each extension group, use the respective creating software to read from selected files -- make sure the files were actually recovered in usasble shape. 


"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#9 TRiCKST3R

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Posted 12 January 2018 - 02:34 AM

"...I could have done the image file and try it that way but I saw my files come up and with a push of a button they were being saved,..."  Later on, connect the external HD where the recovered files were saved to the computer, select some from each extension group, use the respective creating software to read from selected files -- make sure the files were actually recovered in usasble shape. 

 

 

Will do, Thanks.






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