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How to preserve unused pc components?


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#1 tantrik

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Posted 08 January 2018 - 09:13 AM

Processor: Intel Core i3-4130 CPU @ 3.40 GHz

Motherboard: Asus H81M-E

Memory: Transcend 2GB DIMM DDR3 1333 MHz (Channel 'B')

Undefined 2GB DIMM DDR3 1600 MHz (Channel A)

OS: Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 64 bit

 

 

Dear friends,

 

I am planning to buy a new desktop pc in couple of months with the latest generation of processor, motherboard, ram and new hard disk available in the market. I want to preserve my present pc components (processor, motherboard, hard disk and ram) for future use since they are working without any hassle. Will my present pc components function properly and last longer if not used for a long time? Should I use the unused motherboard, processor, ram and hard disk once in couple of months just to check and make sure they are in proper working condition? How effectively can I preserve the current pc components for future use if needed?

 

Thanks in advance.



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#2 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 08 January 2018 - 09:48 AM

Although I can not answer your question I can give you my first hand experience. I have had a couple of old PCs (between 7 and 10 years old) stored out in my garage for about 5 years. When I brought them in and plugged them in they worked perfectly. My garage gets very hot in the summer and very cold in the winter, so I do not know how that effects things.


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#3 britechguy

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Posted 08 January 2018 - 10:19 AM

I can also report that every PC I've ever stored, or borrowed from friends when I needed "ancient hardware" that I know they've stored, has worked just fine when plugged in and fired up (after being allowed to come up to or down to ambient room temperature - I don't try to fire up "frozen" or "on fire" hardware).

 

This is for equipment kept in basements (which are at least reasonably climate controlled) and garages and attics (which have huge temperature swings).


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#4 jonuk76

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Posted 08 January 2018 - 03:22 PM

The only thing about storing things like that is unless you have some planned use for it, the longer it's stored the more out of date it becomes and the less value it holds.  You could probably sell a 4th gen i5, motherboard, and DDR3 today for a good price.  In five years, they'll probably be worth peanuts.


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#5 tantrik

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Posted 09 January 2018 - 02:51 AM

Thanks everyone for your precious suggestion in this matter. Highly appreciate it.



#6 Platypus

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Posted 09 January 2018 - 04:11 AM

Some equipment can deteriorate when left unused for long periods of time, but it's less prone to occur than it was in the past. Over my 40+ years as a technician, I repaired many devices that failed (sometimes spectacularly) when powered up after long storage (years). The main candidate was electrolytic capacitors, which can have their insulating oxide layer deteriorate with the absence of a sustaining voltage. But modern capacitors are much less prone to the problem.

I have observed numerous hard drives fail to be usable after storage for 5 to 6 years, so I still like to run any stored equipment that I'd like to keep viable, maybe every 12 months fire it up for an hour or so.
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#7 tantrik

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 12:14 AM

When I bought the current pc components, each of those came in with plastic bags with ziploc except the hard disk and motherboard. Will it be alright to put the pc components inside those ziploc plastic bags for preservation? I initially planned to wrap the pc components with newspaper, put inside ordinary plastic bags or cardboard boxes and store somewhere in cool and dry place. Let me know where I am wrong here. Thanks.



#8 Platypus

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 12:50 AM

Parts are normally supplied in anti-static (ESD) bags, usually pink or silvery, it's perfectly satisfactory to store components in these.

41pgwo8X66L._SX355_.jpg
 


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#9 tantrik

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 03:05 AM

Parts are normally supplied in anti-static (ESD) bags, usually pink or silvery, it's perfectly satisfactory to store components in these.

41pgwo8X66L._SX355_.jpg
 

Thanks for the valuable suggestion.



#10 Guest_Joe C_*

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 10:09 AM

Try to think of pc parts like you would fruit or vegetables. They have a short shelf life, which means the longer you hang onto to them, the less value they will have. Unless your into some kind of museum stuff for very old antiques then there is no future in saving pc parts



#11 britechguy

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 10:49 AM

They have a short shelf life, which means the longer you hang onto to them, the less value they will have. Unless your into some kind of museum stuff for very old antiques then there is no future in saving pc parts

 

You are 100% correct about "short shelf life" if the metric is what the monetary value of the parts is.   However, as far as long term storage and being able to function, they've mostly got a very, very long shelf life.  As someone noted, it's generally the hard drives that suffer the most from very long term storage and even many of them don't suffer at all.

 

I certainly would not be breaking a machine down to save parts for the long term.   I have put a number of full machines in my "on the shelf for only very occasional use" storage because some software is now impossible to get yet occasionally still of use.  I've also found things like old screen savers, still in shrink wrap, that came on 3.25" floppies that it was fun to be able to get them up and running to view the art work.   Sometimes having a small "technology museum" has its uses.  Having a parts bin, unless you're a repair tech and your client knows that used parts are being used, really isn't, at least not generally.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#12 Guest_Joe C_*

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 11:56 AM

By "short shelf life" I do mean monetary value.

It's o.k. to have a spare power supply, some various memory or a GPU on hand if you like do your own diagnostics 

 

If you do not self diagnose, then doing things like hanging on to a bunch of DDR3 memory when everything you now have uses DDR4 is useless. Sell it right now today on Craigslist or Ebay while prices are at the maximum because they'll soon be of little value in the future


Edited by Joe C, 10 January 2018 - 12:06 PM.


#13 britechguy

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 12:36 PM

If you do not self diagnose, then doing things like hanging on to a bunch of DDR3 memory when everything you now have uses DDR4 is useless. Sell it right now today on Craigslist or Ebay while prices are at the maximum because they'll soon be of little value in the future

 

Absolutely.  All computer component parts (and, actually, computers themselves) lose value extremely rapidly, and parts often more so than the whole.  They're just as bad, if not worse, than automobiles.

 

The only thing I will keep is a whole computer and, these days, that would only be a laptop and only if there is something on it that really isn't easy to port (or even possible to port) to a more recent platform.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#14 tantrik

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 11:42 PM

Thanks again everyone for your suggestion.






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