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Speaker wiring


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9 replies to this topic

#1 hellhound

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 12:35 PM

Hello!

I just got this speaker from a small radio and besides it i have a jack and an usb cable with + and  -.

I was wondering if i can use the 5 v coming from the usb to boost that speaker.

If i connect it only using the jack it is not loud at all,works but not with the desired volume.I tried connecting them but once i touch the speaker with the usb wires the music stops and a loud "crrrrrr" is all I hear.

I don't have the things necessary for an amplifier so I hoped i can do it without one.What I'm trying to say is that I'd like to have the speaker powered by the usb cable while the jack is used for the audio input.

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#2 OldPhil

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 12:49 PM

Not sire but you may cause damage trying to power that speaker. you would way ahead buying a cheap set from your local supply.  The sound on my lap top is poor that is being kind, I bought a pair of Insignia speakers for $16,95 it is a drastic improvement!!


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#3 hellhound

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 12:53 PM

Not sire but you may cause damage trying to power that speaker. you would way ahead buying a cheap set from your local supply.  The sound on my lap top is poor that is being kind, I bought a pair of Insignia speakers for $16,95 it is a drastic improvement!!

I wanted to do this as a little project for myself,I have a set of speakers already.I think it will not be possible without an amplifier.Thanks for the suggestion!


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#4 OldPhil

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 01:02 PM

You welcome. I always worry about harming the unit when fiddling around.

 

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#5 mightywiz

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 02:26 PM

on a desktop this is a feature already built in.  on the motherboard that is specifically for an internal speaker like what your tying to connect.  almost all desktops have this connection it's just not used much.

 

you would have to download the manual and the speaker connector is usually next the the HDD led, PWR led, reset switch connections.

 

on a laptop you do not have this option and you have to use amplified speakers in the headphone jack.



#6 hellhound

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 03:04 PM

on a desktop this is a feature already built in.  on the motherboard that is specifically for an internal speaker like what your tying to connect.  almost all desktops have this connection it's just not used much.
 
you would have to download the manual and the speaker connector is usually next the the HDD led, PWR led, reset switch connections.
 
on a laptop you do not have this option and you have to use amplified speakers in the headphone jack.


I see,thanks for the information!

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#7 DavisMcCarn

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 05:00 PM

One of the secrets of the modern world is that the signal definitions for audio were originally defined in the 1960's and really haven't changed much since.  The standards used by devices like cassette decks or radio tuners for line in and line out are 100 millivolts, peak to peak, and are specified as such so that you won't blow your amplifier by overdriving the input.  The one common device that was different was the output from a turntable (remember LP records?) which often required a preamplifier or, at least a special set of input connections on the tuner/amplifier.

I mention all of this because you are a rare individual that is even curious about the possibilities of projects.

Older (early 1990's) sound cards had an amplifier on the card and I still have speakers that need it because there is no amplifier built into the speakers, themselves.

SOME, Dell OptiPlex PCs also included special hardware and drivers that would route the audio to the PC's speaker if no external speakers were plugged in; but, you now have to ram Windows Vista drivers down the PC's throat in order to make it work on 7, 8, or 10.  The internal speaker normally gives you the "beep" from the BIOS just before the PC boots and is, thereafter, silent.

So, all of the audio connections on a modern PC use the old (1960's) standards for line-in and line-out and you must have an amplifier between the jack and any speaker unless your OK with the feeble, hold it up to your ear, volume.  The problem is not the voltage on the speaker, it's the peak-to-peak voltage driving the speaker and 100 millivolts (1/10th of one volt) won't do very much.


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#8 hellhound

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 05:04 PM

One of the secrets of the modern world is that the signal definitions for audio were originally defined in the 1960's and really haven't changed much since.  The standards used by devices like cassette decks or radio tuners for line in and line out are 100 millivolts, peak to peak, and are specified as such so that you won't blow your amplifier by overdriving the input.  The one common device that was different was the output from a turntable (remember LP records?) which often required a preamplifier or, at least a special set of input connections on the tuner/amplifier.
I mention all of this because you are a rare individual that is even curious about the possibilities of projects.
Older (early 1990's) sound cards had an amplifier on the card and I still have speakers that need it because there is no amplifier built into the speakers, themselves.
SOME, Dell OptiPlex PCs also included special hardware and drivers that would route the audio to the PC's speaker if no external speakers were plugged in; but, you now have to ram Windows Vista drivers down the PC's throat in order to make it work on 7, 8, or 10.  The internal speaker normally gives you the "beep" from the BIOS just before the PC boots and is, thereafter, silent.
So, all of the audio connections on a modern PC use the old (1960's) standards for line-in and line-out and you must have an amplifier between the jack and any speaker unless your OK with the feeble, hold it up to your ear, volume.  The problem is not the voltage on the speaker, it's the peak-to-peak voltage driving the speaker and 100 millivolts (1/10th of one volt) won't do very much.

Thank you very much for the information!It is highly educational.I always thought that since the scraching noise is very loud when I connect the speaker to 5 v usb port it might need more power.Really interesting stuff,thanks!

Edited by hellhound, 05 January 2018 - 05:05 PM.

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#9 DavisMcCarn

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Posted 06 January 2018 - 07:54 AM

The way that a speaker works is through a coil attached to the cone (paperlike funnel shaped disk) which floats around a permanent magnet.  The voltage applied to that coil pushes and pulls the cone which then pushes and pulls the air creating the noise that we hear.  Old style, intercom speakers (ala in the ceiling at stores, etc.) used 70 volts peak to peak which is 700 times more power (translates to movement) than the line out's 100 millivolts.  What the amplifier does is to up the 100 mv to a much higher voltage so it can make the speaker cone move more forcefully (louder) and further so no amp equals no volume.


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#10 Platypus

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Posted 06 January 2018 - 08:23 AM

Just to keep the record straight, the 100mV line level and 70V PA voltage are RMS, not peak-to-peak.


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