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Broadband Speed.


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12 replies to this topic

#1 Overath

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 11:09 AM

I live in a fairly remote, rural, area.

We have had broadband for around 12 years, but we do not have the latest (fibre-optic?) faster broadband.

However, for around 9 years, I was quite happy with a the speed available. For much of this time I had Windows XP as the operating system.

I then bought a new desktop computer with Windows 8.1 already installed.

The broadband speed slowed but I found it just about bearable.

About a year ago I had a problem with the PC. A new hard drive was inserted along with Windows 10.

The speed dropped immediately, by a large amount, and  is now very slow and annoying.

It is difficult for the layperson to understand why speed is now lower than what was available some years ago!

Is it possible the latest Windows 10 operating system, with what I imagine to be some significant  improvements over older operating systems, is, however, less able to handle a  slow broadband speed most often found in rural areas?



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#2 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 11:31 AM

What is the speed of your internet?

 

http://beta.speedtest.net/


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#3 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 11:34 AM

The legal definition of broadband is 25 mbps which is very decent. If you do not have 25 mbps, then you DO NOT have broadband.

 

https://www.theverge.com/2015/1/29/7932653/fcc-changed-definition-broadband-25mbps


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#4 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 12:54 PM

I multi boot on my PC with Windows 7, Windows 8.1 and Windows 10 and Linux Mint, Ubuntu, openSUSE and other Linux distros. I do not notice any difference between one OS and another, they all have the same internet speed. You might need to update your router because I doubt that your problem is related to drivers that are associated with diferent OSes.


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#5 Overath

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 06:59 AM

I live in the UK and I do not believe we have any LEGAL definition of what speed determines whether or not one has broadband.

I am aware of the fact that, certainly within the UK, there can be large differences in speed between different areas.

I have a slow broadband speed and my question, put simply, is whether newer operating systems, such as Windows 10, are less able to handle slow broadband speeds.

I ask this because my speed is much slower with Windows 10 than I used to have with Windows XP.  



#6 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 07:26 AM

No there is no difference in the way that different operating systems handle internet speed. The actual internet speed is determined by the router, an operating system is agnostic as to internet speed. I use many different operating systems and they all register the exact same speed.

 

http://www.broadbandspeedchecker.co.uk/


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#7 Overath

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 11:10 AM

If thi is the case why did my PC slow down only after new operating systems were installed?

I do not know if you live in the UK, but our fast internet speeds come from what is called fibre broadband.

Around 95% of the population have access to fibre, but is not available yet in certain rural areas with a low and scattered population.

This may explain why my broadband speed is slow but it does not explain why the speed dropped even lower, suddenly, after new operating systems were installed.

NB: I have the same router, at present, with windows 10 as I had, previously, with Windows 8.1



#8 dc3

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 11:22 AM

With each new version of Windows the use of resources increases which in turn slows down your online speed.

 

Windows 10 comes enabled with automatic Windows updates. The update function stays active in the background and can consume large chunks of network bandwidth as it checks for and downloads all the updates. Although it is recommended to keep Windows updated, you can temporarily disable the feature. This might boost your Internet speed.

During the Windows 10 rollout, Microsoft devised an automatic system that turns your PC into a file-sharing server to reduce the load on the central Window’s servers. As a result of this P2P sharing service, a portion of your network services is constantly engaged in background activities.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#9 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 02:17 PM

What dc3 is trying to say is that it may appear that your online speed is different with different operating systems, but in fact if you try a little experiment with your own equipment and multi-booting different operating systems, you will see that there is no real difference. You can install a very lightweight Linux like Puppy Linux and test your internet speed compared with Windows 10 and you will see that they are identical. Like dc3 said, there may be things going on with your system in the background, i.e. updates and what not, that may make it seem like your internet speed is different, but if you run the broadband speed test you will see that they will be the same.

 

My advice is to make sure your router is updated and then reboot your router. Internet speed is OS agnostic, but the router does require regular attention.

 

Edit: The last part of dc3's post is very important because you can disable that feature. It comes enabled from the factory but it is a good idea to disable it.


Edited by Rocky Bennett, 05 January 2018 - 02:19 PM.

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#10 dc3

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 02:26 PM

What dc3 is trying to say is that it may appear that your online speed is different with different operating systems, but in fact if you try a little experiment with your own equipment and multi-booting different operating systems, you will see that there is no real difference. You can install a very lightweight Linux like Puppy Linux and test your internet speed compared with Windows 10 and you will see that they are identical. Like dc3 said, there may be things going on with your system in the background, i.e. updates and what not, that may make it seem like your internet speed is different, but if you run the broadband speed test you will see that they will be the same.

 

My advice is to make sure your router is updated and then reboot your router. Internet speed is OS agnostic, but the router does require regular attention.

 

Edit: The last part of dc3's post is very important because you can disable that feature. It comes enabled from the factory but it is a good idea to disable it.

If you actually read my post you would see that I am not implying anything, I'm explaining the facts as the exist.  With the release of each new Windows operating systems there has been a heavier draw on the system resources.  Windows 10 takes this one step further.


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#11 dhagerjohns

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 03:38 PM

I get what I pay for in terms of internet speed.  I suggest you contact your provider.  



#12 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 06 January 2018 - 07:54 AM

I get what I pay for in terms of internet speed.  I suggest you contact your provider.  

 

 

This is the best idea and I agree 100%.


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#13 Overath

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Posted 06 January 2018 - 08:31 AM

Thanks for the replies.

As far as internet speed is concerned my provider informs me of the maximum speed, available to me, given my location and the broadband infrastructure in use.

The maximum speed is very slow, and is similar to that in surrounding dwellings.

As I have said this is primarily due to the fact our village does not have access, as yet, to fibre  broadband.

I repeat, once again, my question was about any links between operating systems and internet speed and not simply about speed itself.

I must say the relevant answer came from Bleeping Treehugger!






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