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Graphics card not working after cleaning


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#1 Mrdicksplinter

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 12:53 AM

So I was having some trouble with crashes on a game and redownloaded it. For some reason it crashed again, but it was working fine a week ago. I haven't ever completely taken apart the GPU and I discovered the heat paste was nearly cooked off. I put more paste on it and put it back together. When I put it back in the computer I put it in a different slot and there was just a black screen. I have since returned it to the original slot. Both device manager and BIOS could no longer detect the GPU when it was plugged in. BIOS is also set to use peg GPU's so that's not the problem. With integrated graphics I tried to redownload the drivers for the GPU, but in every shape and for of trying to get the drivers it would say I either don't have a GPU or that I didn't have the right drivers. Deleting g the drivers and attempting a complete redownload yielded the same result.

So, why isn't my GPU being recognized by the system? I've reset the motherboard but that didn't help.There is still nothing but a black screen while plugged into the GPU, but the fan is running.

AMD GPU R9 290x
MSI MB
Windows 7

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#2 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 01:45 PM

When you "added more paste" did you first thoroughly clean off the old paste ?  This is something that has to be done. Cotton wool buds and iso-propyl alchohol are my tools of choice. Both faces - the top of theheat sink compoun processors(s) and the bottom of the heat sink - have to be completely clean. Then a thin coating of paste is applied to one surface and then the heatsink clamped down again.

 

If you just added more paste on top of what was already there you would have worsened the heat removal process and the GPU shutting down would not surprise me.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#3 Mrdicksplinter

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 04:46 PM

I cleaned of roughly 95% of it, some was just too small for me to bother with. I fussed with this for another 8 hours and still no dice, at this point I'm wondering if something I did killed the card. There was a bit of thermal paste overflow but I honestly don't think that could be the issue. It was running just fine, but when I booted up a specific game it crashed after a couple minutes, not a CTD, but a complete GPU crash. I noticed there was an update for the drivers so I updated it, but it did it again after a bit longer in that game (it only seems to be this game). So I decided to do everything in my power and clean it, I've got the damn thing apart on my desk with a magnifying glass and I don't see any shorts. Nothing I do can get my computer to recognize it at all. When I download the appropriate drivers it says "do what the manual says when you purchased the item" which was to put the disk in that came with it. When I put the disk in it directs me to the driver page that I just downloaded from. Sometimes I get an "Error 173" which means I don't have the appropriate drivers. So I did a clean sweep with DDU (Cleaned all the amd drivers off the system) to no avail. Like I said, at this point I'm wondering if the card died unless there's something you can suggest. 



#4 Mrdicksplinter

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 06:39 PM

Ok I reset BIOS and removed the CMOS battery and it's still not picking up the gpu. When I look at BIOS it says that there's nothing connected to the peg slot. 



#5 Mrdicksplinter

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 01:50 AM

I slammed an old GPU that's been under my bed for 6 years dust bunnies and all into the computer and it instantly worked, I'm afraid the GPU is looking pretty dead. Don't buy AMD



#6 Jon_Snow89

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 07:22 PM

maybe it was dead already the last time it crashed.. you didn't mentioned the temperature, maybe you've stressed it for a long time at high temperatures until it got burned.



#7 Mrdicksplinter

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Posted 09 January 2018 - 06:01 AM

It always ran hot as bleep, I'm talking 80+ Celsius



#8 C0bra

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Posted 09 January 2018 - 07:54 AM

It always ran hot as bleep, I'm talking 80+ Celsius

 
It's likely dead.
 
80+ Celsius isn't necessarily bad for the card but it's most certainly going to shorten it's life. Ideally, 70C - 60C or below is fine and where most will sit on a decent load. There are probably a ton of other factors that are causing it to overheat the card and I'd probably try to address that first before getting too deep into a new GPU. 

 

-Case: Is it adequately cooled?

-Dust: Was the GPU loaded with dust when you removed it? On the fan, or in the heat sink?

-Filters: Does your case have and utilize fan filters?

-Bottleneck: Are you bottle necking your GPU?

 

You'd be surprised how badly a thin cake of dust can affect temperatures. If your case doesn't have filters you should be cleaning it regularly. A nice case with some fans, filters and good airflow (negative air pressure) can go a long way.


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#9 Mrdicksplinter

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 11:34 AM

Well the problem with it was if the fan kicked on above 50% it sounded like there was a bleep jet engine taking off in my room. The case is a cooler master with with like 6+ fans in it, there was a small amount of dust inside the gpu case, yes my case has filters, and I've never gone over 25% load for my cpu ever. I'm just willing to say my AMD GPU MADE IN TAIWAN TM was a piece of bleep. It was only 3-4 years old and was outclassed by GPU's $100 cheaper than it. RIP in pieces 



#10 C0bra

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 11:43 AM

Well the problem with it was if the fan kicked on above 50% it sounded like there was a bleep jet engine taking off in my room. The case is a cooler master with with like 6+ fans in it, there was a small amount of dust inside the gpu case, yes my case has filters, and I've never gone over 25% load for my cpu ever. I'm just willing to say my AMD GPU MADE IN TAIWAN TM was a piece of bleep. It was only 3-4 years old and was outclassed by GPU's $100 cheaper than it. RIP in pieces 

 

I hear you on that one! My last GPU was an EVGA GTX 670 FTW. It ran in the high 70s in full load and I didn't like that. I'm convinced it was poor design. The thing had just one squirrel cage fan  :nono: I was forced to have to use MSI Afterburner to just jet the fans while gaming because the auto variable speed was just not keeping up! It was horrible and loud too, but it kept it cool and I wear headphones so whatever I guess.

 

Back on point, I'm convinced your GPU was bottlenecking, causing it to be overworked in comparison to you CPU. The CPU is bored on full load while the GPU is sweating away. There are a number of bottleneck calculators around that can help somewhat diagnose a bottleneck. Its best to choose a GPU/CPU combo that work evenly together and not stress one another, although a GPU bottleneck will always be better than a CPU bottleneck. You don't want the CPU overworking while the GPU is bored.

 

Out of curiosity how are you fans arranged in the case? How many in and out and where? 


Edited by C0bra, 11 January 2018 - 11:46 AM.

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#11 Mrdicksplinter

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 12:33 PM

Two in the top, two in the front, one in the back and one in the side (but I don't have that one plugged in, too hard to open the case). And I had to use MSI too, for some reason the GPU was factory set to notrun the fan at 100% speed until it got up to 95 Celsius, Which is bleep mental


Edited by Mrdicksplinter, 11 January 2018 - 12:41 PM.


#12 C0bra

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 12:49 PM

Two in the top, two in the front, one in the back and one in the side (but I don't have that one plugged in, too hard to open the case). And I had to use MSI too, for some reason the GPU was factory set to notrun the fan at 100% speed until it got up to 95 Celsius, Which is bleep mental

 

What direction are the fans?

 

Fronts - In?

Tops - Out?

Back - Out?


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#13 Mrdicksplinter

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 01:06 PM

tops and fronts in, backs and sides out. 



#14 DavisMcCarn

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 01:24 PM

HWMonitor is a great, free tool for looking at the temps.  You also just unzip it and then run the excutable so no installation:

https://www.cpuid.com/softwares/hwmonitor.html

And Furmark is the best GPU stress test I have found:

http://www.geeks3d.com/20170502/furmark-1-19-gpu-burner-stress-test-opengl-benchmark/

 

I am afraid; though, that your video card is toast and had probably had the heatsink busted loose during shipping before you ever put it into the PC.  When its not detected by the system anymore, there is something seriously wrong.


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#15 C0bra

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 01:32 PM

So you're pushing positive pressure in the case which is more intake than exhaust. Personally I like negative pressure, it does allow more dust in than positive, but with my fan filters I still don't need cleanings often - plus my case is on top of my desk roughly 3 ft off the ground which helps reduce dust intake.

 

While positive pressure is not a bad thing, I fear with the intake fans at the top pushing down and your intakes at the front pushing in, you're having circulation problems. While in theory pushing more cool air into the case will cool it, having no place for hot air to exit can be counter productive. Give negative pressure a shot, which is more exhaust than intake.

 

My build is as follows...

 

3 x Front (Intake)

3 x Top (Exhaust)

1 x Rear (Exhaust)

 

If you can visualize the airflow you can see the cool air will enter the front, warm up (and rise; hot air rises) and be sucked out the top/back of my case. I love this method it promoted a good flow of air, and I feel like it cools my entire case very efficiently. 

 

For your particular build, personally, I'd try...

 

2 x Front (Intake)

2 x Top (Exhaust)

1 x Back (Exhaust)

 

Do note that with this, air will be sucked into the case, which means your non-functioning side fan (I'm assuming has no filter) will attract air and likely dust. (Just tape it shut or something :lmao: )


Edited by C0bra, 11 January 2018 - 01:35 PM.

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