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BSOD Fairly often, need help figuring out the issue


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#1 Excelsior16

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 06:09 PM

It usually would happen once a week but seems to be getting worse.

 

Speccy information: http://speccy.piriform.com/results/TLEJRIzY8rSe2T16MRcQJRZ

 

If any other information could be helpful please let me know!

Thank you!

Attached Files


Edited by Excelsior16, 03 January 2018 - 06:10 PM.


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#2 jcgriff2

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 11:12 PM

Hi. . .

The 2 dumps named no 3rd party driver.

See if Driver Verifier can help here - https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/576333/driver-verifier-bsod-related-windows-10-81-8-7-vista/

Let it run in the background for at least 24 hours. If the system BSODs while Driver Verifier is running, get the dump (\windows\minidump); zip it up (copy it to Desktop or Documents first); attach it to your next post.

Regards. . .

jcgriff2
Microsoft MVP 2009-2015

#3 Excelsior16

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 05:19 AM

Hi. . .

The 2 dumps named no 3rd party driver.

See if Driver Verifier can help here - https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/576333/driver-verifier-bsod-related-windows-10-81-8-7-vista/

Let it run in the background for at least 24 hours. If the system BSODs while Driver Verifier is running, get the dump (\windows\minidump); zip it up (copy it to Desktop or Documents first); attach it to your next post.

Regards. . .

jcgriff2

Thanks! Been running it for over 24 hours now, haven't crashed.



#4 jcgriff2

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 11:20 PM

I was hoping it would BSOD as doing so would highly suggest your BSODs are software related.

It now appears that your BSODs are being caused by UNKNOWN hardware failure.
Microsoft MVP 2009-2015

#5 Excelsior16

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 11:49 PM

I was hoping it would BSOD as doing so would highly suggest your BSODs are software related.

It now appears that your BSODs are being caused by UNKNOWN hardware failure.

Yeah figured that was the reason, but I followed the driver verifier instructions etc so I don't think I did it incorrectly.

Any other things I could do to try and figure it out?

I remember one crash the BSOD message was like "critical structure corruption" and something about "What failed: win32kfull.sys " If that's helpful at all.



#6 jcgriff2

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Posted 06 January 2018 - 11:43 PM

Hi. . .

You probably saw "win32k.sys" - the win32 subsystem driver. It is a Microsoft driver and is considered sacrosanct; therefore it is not the cause of your BSODs.

Seeing bugcheck 0x109 - Critical Structure Corruption - means that something was attempting to corrupt the kernel. A microsecond of failing RAM or some other hardware failure that caused RAM to become unable to properly hold kernel code would do it. That other hardware piece that momentarily failed could be just about anything.

Kernel memory dumps are typically used by developers to debug software. They are of no use in figuring out hardware issues.

Some hardware diagnostic tests:The problem may also be with other hardware parts such as the motherboard or PSU for which there are no software tests.

Sorry that I couldn't be more help to you.

Regards. . .

jcgriff2

p.s. I'm sure that you ran Driver Verifier just fine. It's job is to stress test drivers and if a driver fails a test/check, Driver Verifier forces a BSOD. Since no BSOD occurred under Verifier, your 3rd party drivers passed the tests.

This is another indicator that you are dealing with UNKNOWN failing hardware.
Microsoft MVP 2009-2015

#7 Excelsior16

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Posted 07 January 2018 - 07:01 AM

Hi. . .

You probably saw "win32k.sys" - the win32 subsystem driver. It is a Microsoft driver and is considered sacrosanct; therefore it is not the cause of your BSODs.

Seeing bugcheck 0x109 - Critical Structure Corruption - means that something was attempting to corrupt the kernel. A microsecond of failing RAM or some other hardware failure that caused RAM to become unable to properly hold kernel code would do it. That other hardware piece that momentarily failed could be just about anything.

Kernel memory dumps are typically used by developers to debug software. They are of no use in figuring out hardware issues.

Some hardware diagnostic tests:

The problem may also be with other hardware parts such as the motherboard or PSU for which there are no software tests.

Sorry that I couldn't be more help to you.

Regards. . .

jcgriff2

p.s. I'm sure that you ran Driver Verifier just fine. It's job is to stress test drivers and if a driver fails a test/check, Driver Verifier forces a BSOD. Since no BSOD occurred under Verifier, your 3rd party drivers passed the tests.

This is another indicator that you are dealing with UNKNOWN failing hardware.

 

Thank you for your help though it sucks there doesn't seem to be a solid reason, however oddly enough my computer has not crashed since I made this post. "Knock on wood" But yeah I'll try running some if not all of those programs to try and see if it's hardware granted Memory, CPU Mobo are all fairly new but I know sometimes things can have issues from the start. 

 

Also When I go to scan my C drive with the error checking I get "There was a problem scanning this drive" But works fine for my D Drive. Not sure what that's about. (Unless it has to do with it being an SSD?)


Edited by Excelsior16, 07 January 2018 - 07:01 AM.


#8 jcgriff2

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Posted 08 January 2018 - 10:28 PM

Also When I go to scan my C drive with the error checking I get "There was a problem scanning this drive" But works fine for my D Drive. Not sure what that's about. (Unless it has to do with it being an SSD?)


Is this error given off by SeaTools for DOS HDD diagnostic test?

If so, I would agree with you about the SSD.

*** VERY IMPORTANT - go to the SSD manufacturer's support site and check for an SSD firmware upgrade.

I could not possibly give you an accurate number of SOLVED BSOD threads that I've worked on -- all caused by the lack of the SSD firmware upgrade. I would estimate the number to be several thousand over the last 10 years.

Yes it does suck big time that the dumps cannot pinpoint the exact piece of hardware that has failed. Believe it or not, Microsoft's dump debugger, Windbg, assumes that the hardware platform is working and stable. Windbg is primarily used by driver developers to debug their software. It was never meant to help diagnose hardware problems. When you think about it, a wire or cable could go bad -- how is a software app supposed to figure that one out? It could not possibly do so.

When it comes to RAM, Windbg cannot tell the difference between bad RAM and kernel code being carried by RAM being bad due to a non-RAM hardware failure that affects RAM -- like the motherboard or PSU. All Windbg knows is that the kernel code at memory address XYZ is bad. How it got that way -- could be any number of UNKNOWN hardware issues.

When the cause of a BSOD is software (3rd party driver), Windbg can tell us the driver name. The driver gets updated and that is the end of the BSOD crisis.

Windbg was never meant to be used in these forums the way it is being used. There are definitely times where Windbg can solve BSODs, a fact that I stumbled on to ~10 years ago and never got it out of my blood.

Good luck to you.

Regards. . .

jcgriff2

Microsoft MVP 2009-2015




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