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If i clone a SSD will i also backup my chrome bookmarks etc ?


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#1 Imacelebrity

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Posted 02 January 2018 - 05:22 PM

id like to clone a harddrive to give a relative( ill install the new ssdin their pc)  as they dont know how to install software etc, but if i do that i guess id also be copying all my google chrome bookmarks and firefox etc..is that correct ?   

 

is there a way around that as id like them to have a clean slate when it comes to bookmarks so they can save sites they use

 

thanks for any help 



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#2 britechguy

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Posted 02 January 2018 - 05:45 PM

If you clone a drive you've done exactly that:  cloned it.  This is a 100% perfect (from the perspective of the data - you can go to a larger or smaller drive if the data itself will fit on either) duplicate of the drive your cloning.

 

It really makes no sense to do this from a number of perspectives.  A cloned hard drive (presuming it's a clone of the main or only hard drive with the OS on it) will have the OS for the hardware it was created on which, given how licensing checks work, will not run on even an identical twin of the machine it came from (at least not without interventions that generally involve the OS's maker).   All of your personal data is copied as well.

 

You would be better off if you could have the machine that needs to be configured in hand to configure it or to get assistance on "the far end" to get remote access and to do the work on the target machine that needs to be done.   Since this sounds like a one-off the idea of creating an installable image with a non-activated install of the OS would be way more trouble than it's worth.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
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#3 Imacelebrity

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Posted 02 January 2018 - 06:07 PM

If you clone a drive you've done exactly that:  cloned it.  This is a 100% perfect (from the perspective of the data - you can go to a larger or smaller drive if the data itself will fit on either) duplicate of the drive your cloning.

 

It really makes no sense to do this from a number of perspectives.  A cloned hard drive (presuming it's a clone of the main or only hard drive with the OS on it) will have the OS for the hardware it was created on which, given how licensing checks work, will not run on even an identical twin of the machine it came from (at least not without interventions that generally involve the OS's maker).   All of your personal data is copied as well.

 

You would be better off if you could have the machine that needs to be configured in hand to configure it or to get assistance on "the far end" to get remote access and to do the work on the target machine that needs to be done.   Since this sounds like a one-off the idea of creating an installable image with a non-activated install of the OS would be way more trouble than it's worth.

thanks it looks like my idea will take me a lot longer to do !  ok ill simply buy a new ssd and get a new windows licence and set it up from scratch

thanks for the quick reply, its for a birthday gift



#4 hamluis

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Posted 02 January 2018 - 06:19 PM

Installing Windows on System A...and then moving a clone or the drive to System B...will reflect the drivers, settings, license applicable to System A, which should be problematical.

 

Louis



#5 Imacelebrity

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Posted 02 January 2018 - 07:06 PM

Installing Windows on System A...and then moving a clone or the drive to System B...will reflect the drivers, settings, license applicable to System A, which should be problematical.

 

Louis

good point id not thought about drivers ! just so i understand this ( as im now going to buy new ssd and get a win10 licence to give relative) if someone did install a clone of a hard drive ( pc 1)   and put that onto pc2   would it cause issues? eg pc1 would have drivers for my external harddrives/printer/mouse/keyboard etc which pc2 wouldnt obviously use so without hardware from pc1 attached to pc2 would those drivers cause any problems ? ( surely they would simply be redundant ??)  

 

thanks for any reply helping me learn !



#6 britechguy

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Posted 02 January 2018 - 11:20 PM

As hamluis has already noted, and particularly if we're talking Windows 10 (but it applies to earlier Windows, too), the license is generally linked to the actual machine on which the OS is installed.  Windows 10 uses the motherboard ID as the unique identifier that gets stored on Microsoft's servers as part of the digital entitlement.

 

You cannot take a hard drive where Windows 10 was installed on "machine 1" and then take that hard drive and plug it in to identical "machine 2" and expect it to work.  Windows 10 is not legally licensed on "machine 2" and that will be immediately detected by the OS itself when it re-checks the digital entitlement.

 

Windows is licensed for the specific instance of a given make/model of machine on which it is originally installed.  Windows is not licensed for another physically identical instance of that same make/model and transplanting a hard drive into that other instance doesn't work.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
             ~ Lauren Bacall
              

 


#7 Imacelebrity

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 04:04 PM

just got this error when trying to view this site ..

Error 520 Ray ID: 3d78e5976e8b3476 • 2018-01-03 21:02:03 UTC Web server is returning an unknown error

 

was ok after i refreshed the page



#8 hamluis

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Posted 06 January 2018 - 02:44 PM

I've never worried about Website errors.  Unless one gets them constantly or consistently...they amount to a vague message that "something has gone wrong momentarily).  Not particularly informative or useful.

 

Louis






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