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Windows Update Frustration


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#1 Meanie

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Posted 28 December 2017 - 01:34 PM

I've finally grown tired of the Windows update.

 

First, it's automatic and I'd rather do it manually....and not just be able to set a date and time on the schedule.

Second, every update screws up other settings on my PC and requires the need to search and learn how to reset things the way I had it. This monopolizing action infuriates me. 

 

This recent update has me in a rage since I am unable to find out how to increase the tab size, task bar size, bookmark size and required font sizes for several browsers and programs such as Chrome, Outlook, Mozilla and a few others. It's obvious Microsoft hasn't any consideration for those of us with less than 20/20 vision then make it extremely difficult to reset the way they were. I'm ready to switch OPs or go to a Mac if unable to resolve this issue. 

 

Can someone please help?

 

Thank you



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#2 old rocker

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Posted 28 December 2017 - 07:59 PM


 

@Meanie
 
Open Settings > System > Display
 
Under Scale and layout choose from the preset 100%, 125%, 150%
 
After experimenting with the above, should these preset scaling options not suit your needs, please continue...

Choose Advanced scaling settings, Make sure 'Let Windows try to fix apps so they're not blurry' is on and choose a custom scaling size 100% - 500%

Click Apply and reboot your system for changes to become effective.
.
Hope this helps you like Windows 10 again  :busy:
 
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#3 rp88

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 11:46 PM

Have you considered switching to linux, linux mint MATE or cinnamon would probably be the most windows like, but ubuntu is fairly windows like too.

You can make live media to try out linux using tools such as unetbootin https://unetbootin.github.io/ if you download it along with the iso file for a linux distro of your choice (here are those for mint https://linuxmint.com/download.php pick the 64 bit one unless your machine is only able to run 32 bit operating systems, most recent machines are 64 bit. MATE is a little faster as it is less pretty in terms of interface, cinnamon is considered more beautiful by some, xfce and kde versions are semi-experimental). You then need a spare USB to make the live media on, be aware that anything previously on this USB is going to be totally erased when you put linux on it, you only need a small cheap 8GB stick. You will then need to go into your BIOS/UEFI and turn off secure boot, along with disabling fast booting if it is offered and changing the boot order to put the USB ports as the first choice of where to boot from. With this done you can restart the PC again and give linux a try, do not install it immediately or you risk wiping your computer, just try it out and don't fiddle with any of the drive partitioning or formatting tools. Running live from a USb like this linux will be rather SLOW, this is because you are trying to run an operating system through the data bottlneck which is a USB port compared to the very fast data rates for a normal internal hard-drive.

But see if you like it, if so then when you shut down again (be warned anything you do in live mode will not be saved, so don't do any important work like this) and boot windows again you can prepare a few more things and get ready to install linux. I can provide you with more detailed tutorials on making and booting a live USB, it can be a bit daunting at first especially if you've never installed an operating system or changed BIOS/UEFI settings before.

I strongly suggest you don't go further than trying out a live USB, that is to say don't try installing linux to your internal hard-drive, until you've had a while to work out what things you do with windows and how/whether you can dod the same in linux after investigating linux equivalents to windows programs you use and after working out whether thngs like the wine compatibility layer are enough to let you replicate what you do on windows on linux. You don't want to try installing linux until you know whether you need to dual boot or whether you can wipe over windows, and f so what stuff needs backing up first.

If you don't want to try linux you could also try downloading install media for indows 8.1 or 7, under some circumstances it is possible to downgrade windows 10 back to an earlier OS. This way you can take control of updates again, but unlike switching to linux going back to windows 7 or 8.1 will only give you a few more years before your OS stops getting security updates.

P.S. when you boot linux, first thing to do is open the terminal and type in "sudo ufw enable", this must be done to turn on the firewall, which is the main security feature in linux.

P.P.S I too have some mild vision issues, 125% ("medium") is far more comfortable on wndows 8.1 for me to look at than the default 100% size is, and on linux too I find I need to set up fonts and such to be larger (changing it is siple in linux and once done it stays how you like it, unless you are running a live system which you won't be after you've tried it out a few times and either instaleld linux to an external drive (a good option, I do this), set up a dual boot (tricky) or wiped windows and replaced it with linux (probably too daring for now)). I guess all operating system designers probably work on huge screens and never realise what it is like to squint at default sized text on laptop sized screens.

Edited by rp88, 29 December 2017 - 11:50 PM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#4 britechguy

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Posted 30 December 2017 - 10:26 AM

. . . Windows 8.1 or 7, under some circumstances it is possible to downgrade windows 10 back to an earlier OS. This way you can take control of updates again, but unlike switching to linux going back to windows 7 or 8.1 will only give you a few more years before your OS stops getting security updates.

 

Is this actually true?   The only reason I ask is that there was a big ballyhoo about Microsoft "retrofitting" the new style update mechanism from Windows 10, or at least the parts that can be made to fit, back in to Windows 7 and Windows 8.1.   Most significantly was the retrofitting of Microsoft determining what and when to update.  I'll have to ask on the Windows 7 forum or fire up my Windows 7 laptop and see what the state of affairs is after all the latest updates (including updates to Windows Update) are applied.

 

Also, as far as changing fonts, etc., it can still  be done pretty easily in Windows 10 using the third-party Winaero Tweaker tool.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#5 JohnC_21

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Posted 30 December 2017 - 10:32 AM

Windows 7 and 8 has had cumulative updates since October of last year. All updates are rolled up into one package. They are cumulative with the intent to have all security and important updates since post SP1 rolled up into one package. The only control you have over updates in Windows 7 is to not allow them. Even using the Windows Update Catalog Security Only updates are rolled up into one package but they are not cumulative. You need to download and install the previous months update before downloading and installing the current month's update.

 

https://www.computerworld.com/article/3240973/microsoft-windows/one-year-later-enterprises-still-wrestle-with-windows-7s-cumulative-updates.html



#6 Meanie

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Posted 30 December 2017 - 11:51 AM

Thank you all for the replies. 

 

Linux was a consideration for an OP but I am still uncertain if I can use many software on it that I'm using now and future programs as well. Though, I'll try that live mode.

 

I don't have a problem with Win 10 as a whole, I'm just tired of Microsoft monopolizing the updates and not allowing users to have their own choice. I don't expect an oil company to force me to refuel or upgrade to a higher octane in my car because I use their gas. I make a purchase, it's mine to do as I please.



#7 JohnC_21

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Posted 30 December 2017 - 12:40 PM

For your software look at this website for alternatives. You can't run Windows programs on linux unless you use Wine which has drawbacks.

 

http://www.linuxalt.com/



#8 britechguy

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Posted 30 December 2017 - 01:39 PM

I don't have a problem with Win 10 as a whole, I'm just tired of Microsoft monopolizing the updates and not allowing users to have their own choice. I don't expect an oil company to force me to refuel or upgrade to a higher octane in my car because I use their gas. I make a purchase, it's mine to do as I please.

 

That analogy fails on several fronts.  Software, and operating systems in particular, are not "yours to do [with] as I please."  Your license agreement for any that are not open source clearly states that it gives you the right to use the software.  Control of said software remains the purview of the company that makes it.

 

With the rare exception of a Windows update that somehow "goes bad" for whatever reason, no one is forced to use a single one of the features that may be in a feature upgrade.  They sit there, dormant, unless you use them.  There is, from a maintenance perspective, a huge advantage in having as many machines running as close to exactly the same version of a given OS as possible.   Any time you have problems (and that's whether with Windows, a Microsoft product other than Windows, or virtually any commercial software [and even open source]) the first question you will generally be asked is:   Are you on the latest version?

 

Not every change that occurs over time is documented for public consumption, though many are.  There are fixes that are applied as part of other updates that may or may not be explicitly listed.

 

Keeping an OS, any OS, as up-to-date as possible has always been, in my personal and professional experience, a win-win proposition.  I've said it before and I'll say it again:  I've been called in to clean up way more "smoldering heaps" of systems where, upon further analysis, it's clear the inferno was the result of refusing to apply updates over a long period of time.   When it comes to OS updates in general (though this quote is about Windows specifically) I cannot help but be in 100% agreement with this observation:

 

There really isn't a point to checking for updates and not installing them. . .  It's important to install all available updates. I've been doing this since the days of DOS, and I still don't have the confidence to pick and choose among updates.  There are just too many variables involved - and most people can't evaluate the full consequences of installing/not installing updates.

        ~ John Carrona, AKA usasma on BleepingComputer.com, http://www.carrona.org/

 

Most people simply cannot or will not accept the absolute truth of the final statement of that observation.  That doesn't make it any less true.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#9 pcpunk

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Posted 30 December 2017 - 04:32 PM

Yeah, just install Linux on another Drive after testing it out.  This way you will have Windows to go back to during your Learning curve.  And just use Linux because MS will never change.  They think they know what is good for us, and we have no say in the matter. 

 

Just setting up a new Windows 10 machine for a customer can be a nightmare, as it's trying to get, install, and restart for it's Out Of the Box setup.  So you can end up with a botched install of some of your software etc. or a botched computer altogether.  I'll stick with Windows 7 and 8.1 and when that goes ary I will only boot my Linux box...Arrrrrgggggg!

 

I do enjoy the Windows 10 experience on my own machines but it causes to many problems for the average person, and that's a fact, because I see it all the time - arguments not welcome - LOL...just kidding.  The whole upgrade/update process to new Versions needs to be revamped, it's constantly botching machines.  I don't want Updates Installing on my machine either, when I'm doing important work, I don't want to take a chance with other things going on with my computer...what...do I need to disconnect from the Net just to be safe from this?  As it is I change the "Active Hours" to avoid a restart while I'm on my computer, and take the full 18hrs.  I don't leave my pc on overnight so I know it will never Restart unless I choose to do so.

 

Rant Over, thanks for reading

 

pcout


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#10 britechguy

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Posted 30 December 2017 - 08:04 PM

I don't leave my pc on overnight so I know it will never Restart unless I choose to do so.

 

 

Just so you know, that is incorrect.   Windows honors the active hours up to a point (I believe, three cycles outside active hours) and if you have not allowed the update to install it will install.

 

I can't, and wouldn't, tell anyone how they should feel about the Windows as a Service era.  What I can say is that if you hate it it's time to find an alternative OS, as this update philosophy is not going away.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#11 pcpunk

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Posted 30 December 2017 - 09:39 PM

Ahh, yes Brian...I remember seeing that somewhere.  Good enough if I can postpone it for a little bit, at least once of twice is fine, so now I know I have three times.  Honestly it's not a problem for me as I use Windows 7 for all my important stuff.  I'll need to learn eventually to live with Windows 10, but I'm afraid it will always be harder on our older clients.


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#12 Meanie

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Posted 31 December 2017 - 11:02 AM


 


 

 

 

That analogy fails on several fronts.  Software, and operating systems in particular, are not "yours to do [with] as I please."  Your license agreement for any that are not open source clearly states that it gives you the right to use the software.  Control of said software remains the purview of the company that makes it.

 

That may be but IMO, I don't think it's right. As I stated, if I purchase a product, it should be mine to do what I please unless it infringes or hurts another.

 

 


With the rare exception of a Windows update that somehow "goes bad" for whatever reason, no one is forced to use a single one of the features that may be in a feature upgrade.  They sit there, dormant, unless you use them.  There is, from a maintenance perspective, a huge advantage in having as many machines running as close to exactly the same version of a given OS as possible.   Any time you have problems (and that's whether with Windows, a Microsoft product other than Windows, or virtually any commercial software [and even open source]) the first question you will generally be asked is:   Are you on the latest version?

 

 

 

...and if not, then charge them accordingly.

 

 


Not every change that occurs over time is documented for public consumption, though many are.  There are fixes that are applied as part of other updates that may or may not be explicitly listed.

 

Keeping an OS, any OS, as up-to-date as possible has always been, in my personal and professional experience, a win-win proposition.  I've said it before and I'll say it again:  I've been called in to clean up way more "smoldering heaps" of systems where, upon further analysis, it's clear the inferno was the result of refusing to apply updates over a long period of time.   When it comes to OS updates in general (though this quote is about Windows specifically) I cannot help but be in 100% agreement with this observation:

 

 

As stated above, if a user doesn't update the system and you or any other tech require the need to revamp, repair, improve, etc, their system, then the fee increases. That's free enterprise for the business owner and a valuable lesson for the PC user. If they fail to update after that, tough nookies...it's their money.

 

 

 

There really isn't a point to checking for updates and not installing them. . .  It's important to install all available updates. I've been doing this since the days of DOS, and I still don't have the confidence to pick and choose among updates.  There are just too many variables involved - and most people can't evaluate the full consequences of installing/not installing updates.

        ~ John Carrona, AKA usasma on BleepingComputer.com, http://www.carrona.org/

 

Most people simply cannot or will not accept the absolute truth of the final statement of that observation.  That doesn't make it any less true.

 

 

Agreed, but nonetheless, it doesn't change the fact people should have the option to choose their own path if they purchase a product. For or against, the end result could be in their favor or against and the results may influence their actions in the future.



#13 Meanie

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Posted 31 December 2017 - 11:08 AM

Yeah, just install Linux on another Drive after testing it out.  This way you will have Windows to go back to during your Learning curve.  And just use Linux because MS will never change.  They think they know what is good for us, and we have no say in the matter. 

 

Just setting up a new Windows 10 machine for a customer can be a nightmare, as it's trying to get, install, and restart for it's Out Of the Box setup.  So you can end up with a botched install of some of your software etc. or a botched computer altogether.  I'll stick with Windows 7 and 8.1 and when that goes ary I will only boot my Linux box...Arrrrrgggggg!

 

I do enjoy the Windows 10 experience on my own machines but it causes to many problems for the average person, and that's a fact, because I see it all the time - arguments not welcome - LOL...just kidding.  The whole upgrade/update process to new Versions needs to be revamped, it's constantly botching machines.  I don't want Updates Installing on my machine either, when I'm doing important work, I don't want to take a chance with other things going on with my computer...what...do I need to disconnect from the Net just to be safe from this?  As it is I change the "Active Hours" to avoid a restart while I'm on my computer, and take the full 18hrs.  I don't leave my pc on overnight so I know it will never Restart unless I choose to do so.

 

Rant Over, thanks for reading

 

pcout

 

Agreed.

 

As I stated, as a whole, I don't have much of a problem with Win 10, but it should be my choice to update when/if I want. In addition, the irritating part is them making changes which completely offsets my original settings. Fine...update my system, but either leave my settings alone or make it easy for me to reset them after the update. It's a lack of consideration for the variety of end users who require different personal settings to help them use the system sufficient for them.


Edited by Meanie, 31 December 2017 - 11:09 AM.


#14 britechguy

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Posted 31 December 2017 - 11:24 AM

 

As I stated, as a whole, I don't have much of a problem with Win 10, but it should be my choice to update when/if I want. In addition, the irritating part is them making changes which completely offsets my original settings. Fine...update my system, but either leave my settings alone or make it easy for me to reset them after the update. It's a lack of consideration for the variety of end users who require different personal settings to help them use the system sufficient for them.

 

 

But, it isn't your choice.  That's a fact and that's not going to change.   Hence my prior statement:  If you can't live with this then you need to find an alternative OS (and, contrary to assertions to the contrary, a lot of those self-update, too).  The Windows world has changed and it's never, ever, going back to what it was.

 

I do, however, agree with regard to settings.  It should be a no-brainer task to log a user's settings prior to an update and to restore them back to that state afterward.  I understand that certain settings may need to be changed as part of updating, but changing them back isn't difficult.   I do have to say, though, that I haven't had a setting change in either 1703 or 1709 updates.  The number of setting changes has been on the constant decrease.  There are plusses (and minuses, potentially) to that, too.  For instance, I disabled all of Cortana's PDA features and inclusion of web results in search so that it is, effectively, the old Windows Search.  Now, however, the options that allowed me to do those changes no longer exist in the Windows 10 Cortana & Search Settings.  While I am perfectly happy to leave things as they are in perpetuity, were I to want to, say, switch the inclusion of web results back on I can't.   In fact, even when I search for "Cortana & Search" in the settings search, and it does show up in the list, choosing it does nothing.  I haven't been able to see "Cortana & Search" settings for ages now (and since I don't need them or want to make changes it really doesn't matter).  I was very lucky in that my nearly brand new (it was new when I got it a couple of months ago) laptop somehow came with Windows 10 Version 1511 on it.  This allowed me to customize all of the Cortana settings to my liking that are now no longer available even when one can get them to come up before I upgraded directly from 1511 to 1709.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 





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