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My First HD Swap - Few Questions


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#1 e46ashley

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Posted 26 December 2017 - 10:58 PM

Here's what I'm working with: 

An old Dell tower
Intel Core2 Vpro (circa 2008)
Refurbished
Windows 7 Pro
Western Digital Caviar Blue 1.0TB SATA HD
Tower turned on when plugged in
Obnoxious alarm sounded (from what I believe is a tiny internal speaker?)
But when I restarted the alarm ceased
Using my television as a monitor
Wireless mouse (Logitech Unifying Receiver USB thing)
USB wired no-name keyboard (I'm fairly certain I just sat down on it… Ooops.) 

A Newish-er 4 Channel Network H.264 DVR
By LOREX (circa 2013) 
Model LH014000H 
Western Digital Green Power 500GB SATA II HD 

When plugged in the fan would spin, but that's all I could confirm was happening 

What I'm trying to do: 
Remove Caviar Blue HD and put it into the Dell Tower 

 

My questions/assumptions: 
The HD from the DVR won't have an OS like I'm used to using with Mac or Windows platforms, will it? 
If I do plug it into this Dell tower, will it boot up like a 'regular' computer with an interface I'm likely to be familiar with?
Both of these are SATA drives meaning they have moving parts inside making them more susceptible or prone to failure than the SSD? 


Thanks for any help or information. :) 
 

 
 



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#2 AnythingButMalware

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Posted 26 December 2017 - 11:42 PM

You'll need to format the drive before it will be usable, but the WD 1TB Drive is much better than the current one. Both are the same size (3.5") so that's good,as for the OS deal, you can image a version of Windows to a USB drive using the Media Creation Tool from Microsoft, once you've done that then you can equip the new drive and install what you need. (Make sure to get the license key from the copy on the old drive!)

Also, yes, HDD's do tend to become more prone to failure than SSDs.

Have you tried turning it off and back on? :P


#3 e46ashley

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Posted 27 December 2017 - 11:01 PM

You'll need to format the drive before it will be usable, but the WD 1TB Drive is much better than the current one. Both are the same size (3.5") so that's good,as for the OS deal, you can image a version of Windows to a USB drive using the Media Creation Tool from Microsoft, once you've done that then you can equip the new drive and install what you need. (Make sure to get the license key from the copy on the old drive!)

Also, yes, HDD's do tend to become more prone to failure than SSDs.

 

 

Thank you!!! 

:hug:

 

My next question was going to be about formatting but I do believe you've answered that question too. I was surprised to see a 1TB drive in there, the last time I geek-played 1TB was still a &*%$ ton of space. Perhaps I'm just old and becoming obsolete myself. 

Thanks again for taking the time to respond. I really appreciate it. :) 



#4 DavisMcCarn

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Posted 28 December 2017 - 03:46 PM

You said that the 2008 Dell had a Western Digital Caviar Blue 1.0TB SATA HD and that the DVR had a Western Digital Green Power 500GB; but, that you wanted to put the Caviar Blue into the Dell.  Unless you misspoke, it already is in the Dell and, if you do what we suppose you meant, put the WD Green into the Dell, you will need to format it, install Windows 7, install any needed drivers, and do six years of updates to bring it current.

Note 1 is that, unless there is a Windows 7 Professional license sticker on the Dell with a product key (25 alpha numeric characters), you won't be able to activate Windows and it will work for 3 days before it starts screaming at you about activation!

Note 2 is that a SATA device cannot cause you to have no video nor will it cause weird beeping.  Is there a pattern to the beeping?  Older Dell's have diagnostic lights that will tell you what it thinks is failing; but, newer ones may use beep codes to indicate what the problem is.  A long slow beep usually indicates a memory problem, for example.

What is the model of the Dell or better yet what is its SERVICE TAG number which is on the case unless someone removed it?


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#5 e46ashley

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 01:14 PM

You said that the 2008 Dell had a Western Digital Caviar Blue 1.0TB SATA HD and that the DVR had a Western Digital Green Power 500GB; but, that you wanted to put the Caviar Blue into the Dell.  Unless you misspoke, it already is in the Dell and, if you do what we suppose you meant, put the WD Green into the Dell, you will need to format it, install Windows 7, install any needed drivers, and do six years of updates to bring it current.

Note 1 is that, unless there is a Windows 7 Professional license sticker on the Dell with a product key (25 alpha numeric characters), you won't be able to activate Windows and it will work for 3 days before it starts screaming at you about activation!

Note 2 is that a SATA device cannot cause you to have no video nor will it cause weird beeping.  Is there a pattern to the beeping?  Older Dell's have diagnostic lights that will tell you what it thinks is failing; but, newer ones may use beep codes to indicate what the problem is.  A long slow beep usually indicates a memory problem, for example.

What is the model of the Dell or better yet what is its SERVICE TAG number which is on the case unless someone removed it?

 

Wow! What a detailed and awesome response. First, I must say a sincere thank you. Next, you are absolutely correct, I misspoke about which drive came out of which. 
Note 1: There is a Windows 7 Professional license sticker on the Dell. 
Note 2: I didn't mean to imply that the drive was causing the beeping. I meant to say that there is a speaker in the tower itself that was causing the beeping. It was a consistent beeping, sounded similar to an annoying alarm clock. However, I can't seem to replicate the problem, in which case, I suppose it's no problem? I am looking for a service tag momentarily and will post it if/when I find it. 

 

New Note: I gather from your reply that my little experiment here is not going to produce any fantastic results, really just a learning experience? I'm still grateful for the help. I got the other drive mounted into the tower and the tower turned on and had video and all that jazz. Just figuring out what to do from there (formatting) is my next step, I think. 



#6 JohnC_21

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 02:41 PM

If there is 400GB or less of data on the 1TB then I would simply clone the 1TB to the 500GB drive and be done with it. 

 

On another note if this Windows 7 Pro was installed by Dell and you see a Windows 7 COA sticker on the side of the computer Dell is using a SLP key with a SLIC table in BIOS to activate the OS. If you used a key finder on all Dells with Windows 7 they would be using the same key. The SLP key is used with a certificate. Starting with Windows 8 discrete keys are embedded in the MSDM firmware table. There are no COA stickers on Windows 8 and above OEM computers.

 

You could backup your activation files and certificate using Advanced Tokens Manager. Unzip the file to a folder on the desktop. Run the program and write down the key it finds as this is the key you would use on the clean install, not the one on the COA sticker. Press the Activation Backup button. This will change to Activation Restore after it completes. Save the unzipped folder on the desktop to a USB flash drive. Do a clean install of Windows 7 using the key ATM found. Once installed copy the folder from the USB key to the desktop. Run ATM again and click the Activation Restore button. This will restore the activation files and certificate. Windows will be activated. This works great if the key on the COA sticker is no longer legible or you prefer not to do a phone activation which would be required using the key on the COA sticker. Did this on a laptop where the COA sticker was worn to the point where is was no longer legible.

 

http://www.majorgeeks.com/files/details/advanced_tokens_manager.html

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ikOykme9UkE

I would agree with you that there is really no reason to go from a larger to smaller drive on the tower.



#7 e46ashley

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 10:24 PM

If there is 400GB or less of data on the 1TB then I would simply clone the 1TB to the 500GB drive and be done with it. 

 

On another note if this Windows 7 Pro was installed by Dell and you see a Windows 7 COA sticker on the side of the computer Dell is using a SLP key with a SLIC table in BIOS to activate the OS. If you used a key finder on all Dells with Windows 7 they would be using the same key. The SLP key is used with a certificate. Starting with Windows 8 discrete keys are embedded in the MSDM firmware table. There are no COA stickers on Windows 8 and above OEM computers.

 

You could backup your activation files and certificate using Advanced Tokens Manager. Unzip the file to a folder on the desktop. Run the program and write down the key it finds as this is the key you would use on the clean install, not the one on the COA sticker. Press the Activation Backup button. This will change to Activation Restore after it completes. Save the unzipped folder on the desktop to a USB flash drive. Do a clean install of Windows 7 using the key ATM found. Once installed copy the folder from the USB key to the desktop. Run ATM again and click the Activation Restore button. This will restore the activation files and certificate. Windows will be activated. This works great if the key on the COA sticker is no longer legible or you prefer not to do a phone activation which would be required using the key on the COA sticker. Did this on a laptop where the COA sticker was worn to the point where is was no longer legible.

 

http://www.majorgeeks.com/files/details/advanced_tokens_manager.html

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ikOykme9UkE

I would agree with you that there is really no reason to go from a larger to smaller drive on the tower.

 

How awesome, thanks so much for taking the time to read and respond to my question. I really appreciate it. It's funny how savvy I think I am until I am amongst real knowledge and talent. :) 

I 'oopsed' when I wrote the original post, the larger drive came out of the DVR, not the tower. I am mostly just doing this to get a run at formatting and to see if I could take the miscellaneous parts lying around in the hall closet for Gods know what reason & put together a tower that I could allow my children to familiarize with and not have to fear risking all the data on my PC. 

 

Anyhow, a sincere thank you, I appreciate the the time and effort very much.



#8 DavisMcCarn

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Posted 30 December 2017 - 10:02 AM

Having personally replaced the hard disk drives in literally thousands of Dell's and others,  I want to propose a different scenario about keys and activation.  Dell and others create a master image of what they want on every one of that particular model of PC and then simply replicate it however many million times they want before the drives are installed during assembly.  Embedded in that image is their, unlimited, manufacturing license key so it is already activated and, if you create the recovery media for reinstalling later, it has that same manufacturing license key embedded in the image.  But; in order to satisfy Microsoft's licensing requirements, each manufacturer, Dell included, had to put a license sticker on each PC which has it's own, unique, key.  This was true for Windows 2000, XP, Vista, and 7 after which Microsoft changed to the embedded SLIC model and there are no stickers on the PCs.

So, with Windows 7 or earlier, if you start with a generic operating system CD/DVD for installation, you need to use the license key on the sticker to activate or Windows will start screaming about not being genuine.  With Windows 8 or 8.1, the key is pulled from the SLIC table in the BIOS and gets activated using that key.  Windows 10 changed the model, yet again, in that it creates a hash of the specific hardware, checks it against a Microsoft licensing server, and will reactivate automatically the first time a fresh installation connects to the internet as long as the hash is reasonably close to the original hardware. (You can change the hard disk drive, upgrade the memory or CPU, or add a video card; but, don't do them all at once and you can't change the system board.)

Unfortunately; shortly after the release of Windows 10, Microsoft pulled the downloads for Windows 7 making it far more difficult to obtain a genuine Microsoft Windows 7 installation DVD.  Luckily, HeiDoc.net has written a tool which will let you get those images named Windows ISO Downloader and it still lets you download an image of numerous versions of Windows and Office: https://www.heidoc.net/joomla/technology-science/microsoft/67-microsoft-windows-and-office-iso-download-tool

You need to be able to burn an ISO image to a DVD; but, since you have a valid license key, you can use a Windows 7 Professional DVD to install and then use the key to activate it.

I had asked about the PC's SERVICE TAG because there may be some hardware drivers which need to be downloaded and saved onto a working PC then copied to the fresh installation using a flash drive for it to work.  Even though it is older than Windows 7 (2009), Realtek network chips have a nasty habit of not being functional until you install the drivers.

So, again, what is the model of the Dell or what is its service tag number?


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