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My friend is locked out of her computer


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#1 raiden223

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Posted 23 December 2017 - 03:28 PM

My friend's ex changed the password on her computer, and now she can't access it. She has important things on the computer, and she can't get the password from her ex because they aren't on speaking terms. Is there any way she can get around the password?



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#2 Vectron

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Posted 23 December 2017 - 03:35 PM

I assume you're talking about a Windows computer. As long as data isn't encrypted you can always boot a live linux distro i.e. Ubutnu and access the data directly by mounting the disk and opening it in a file browser. You can then copy the data off to another device.



#3 raiden223

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Posted 23 December 2017 - 03:54 PM

I assume you're talking about a Windows computer. As long as data isn't encrypted you can always boot a live linux distro i.e. Ubutnu and access the data directly by mounting the disk and opening it in a file browser. You can then copy the data off to another device.

I don't know what most of that means, but are you saying she'll be able to get her stuff off of the computer, but not access the computer?



#4 britechguy

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Posted 23 December 2017 - 04:32 PM

It would really help to know what operating system (I, too, presume Windows, but which Windows - that's important) and, if Windows 10, is she using a Microsoft Account linked user login (typically the e-mail address one uses for one's Microsoft Account) or a local account.


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#5 Vectron

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Posted 24 December 2017 - 09:01 AM

I don't know what most of that means, but are you saying she'll be able to get her stuff off of the computer, but not access the computer?

 

It all depends on the type of setup she is using. First of all please tell us what operating system (including the version) is installed on her computer. It's difficult to say anything without knowing at least this information. After that we can discuss more. I'm more of a linux guy, so I have less knowledge about Windows, but I did find some tutorials on Google about reseting the login password.
 



#6 britechguy

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Posted 24 December 2017 - 10:03 AM

Again, for emphasis, it is impossible to give you any sort of accurate advice without additional specifics regarding the situation.

 

You really need to know what OS is involved and, if it happens to be Windows 10, what account type (Microsoft Account linked or local) is being used.

 

What one can and should (or should not) do is entirely context specific.

 

BTW, I am very well-versed in the Windows ecosystems.


Edited by britechguy, 24 December 2017 - 10:03 AM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

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#7 Didier Stevens

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Posted 24 December 2017 - 01:28 PM

Another possibility is that the password is not set at the OS level, but at BIOS/UEFI level.


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#8 dropbear

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Posted 24 December 2017 - 05:30 PM

so it allowed to give advice on how to side-step password protected PC's?

very grey area for me!


Instead of reading this, why not do a backup of your PC.

You won't regret it.


#9 britechguy

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Posted 24 December 2017 - 06:36 PM

so it allowed to give advice on how to side-step password protected PC's?

very grey area for me!

 

It's been done many times on BC when, by all information available, it is a "I've forgotten my password" or similar situation.   This happens too often to be ignored or treated as nefarious on any computer technical support forum.

 

For me, it's really a matter of what vibe I pick up in the individual requests.

 

Also, it's no secret that one can use one's Microsoft Account to change the password for the Windows 10 user account that is linked to it and you'd need to know the password to the Microsoft Account (or go through their recovery process in order to regain access on that side) to do this.

 

Lazesoft's password recovery software for local accounts only on Windows 10 (and, I believe, all other earlier versions of Windows) has been discussed more than once on these parts, including very recently on the thread, Cant log into windows 10, and others.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

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#10 rp88

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Posted 28 December 2017 - 11:43 AM

In regards to post #7, BIOS/UEFI passwords can generally be reset to nothing by opening up a PC and taking out the BIOS battery, but you need to know the model of the PC so you can carefully look online for EXACT instructions for the make and model about how to open it, where this battery is located and the exact procedure for safely wiping the BIOS password. Most likely however, the BIOS/UEFI will not have a password set, very few people ever set up passwords at this level.

Vectron in post #2 has provided a very good solution, BUT there might be better solutions if you are lucky, solutions which let you not only recover data but also recover the OS without having to wipe it and reinstall again. If raiden223 needs to use this method we'll need to give much more detaield instructions on live booting linux, but it shouldn't be considered until other methods have been tried. One problem is though that a lot of PCs thesedays will have encrypted harddrives, and in this case a live boot with a USB won't let you get at the data on the PC. Various other windows reset tools will still let you get at the data if you are lucky. britechguy is very much correct in saying w need details of your OS (operating system), hardware make and model, whether the computer has a local account and whether anyone is aware of any encryption on the harddrive.

Edited by rp88, 28 December 2017 - 11:44 AM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

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