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Does My Laptop Run a Bit Hot?


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#1 Boris_yo

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Posted 20 December 2017 - 04:00 AM

Hello,

 

Here's a temperature of system components when there is nothing actively taking CPU load:

 

Attached File  PC-temperature_2017-12-16_18-43-38.jpg   50.14KB   0 downloads

 

I have external DELL 21.5" monitor

 

Here are computer specs:

 

DELL Latitude E6420

Intel® Core™ i5-2520M Processor

8GB of RAM

Intel HD Graphics (active) with NVIDIA NVS 4200M (auxiliary)

250GB Samsung EVO SSD

 

It's 20 C (68 F) outside but in summer, it gets very hot inside, like 32C (89.6 F) so I wondering if there's a cooling issue in my system or whether I need to renew thermal paste. I have Arctic brand.

 

Also, a few things that I find strange is a noise that reminds like something clicks or breaks that I don't know where it comes from. Could it be from worn-out original 6-cell battery that I always keep inside laptop? Could be from GPU? Could it be due to deformation caused by heat inside?

 

Thanks.


Edited by Boris_yo, 20 December 2017 - 04:04 AM.


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#2 PhillPower2

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Posted 20 December 2017 - 12:01 PM

Hello Boris_yo,

 

The CPU temps are quite high for a computer that is not under any particular load, would expect them to be around the 60°C range, when was the last time that the inside was cleaned out of heat trapping dust.

 

I wondering if there's a cooling issue in my system or whether I need to renew thermal paste. 

 

 

With the exception of extreme overclocking, hardware failure or incorrectly applied thermal compound,wthat was originally applied will most often last the lifetime of the computer.

 

Also, a few things that I find strange is a noise that reminds like something clicks or breaks that I don't know where it comes from. Could it be from worn-out original 6-cell battery that I always keep inside laptop?

 

 

This needs investigating as it could be the internal cooling fan blades catching on something or the HDD warning you by giving out the dreaded click of death, the temp of the HDD looks ok though and most only start grumbling when their temps get near 50°C, as far as the main power brick goes, remove it, notebook batteries should never be left in place if permanently using the AC adaptor as it reduces their life cycle.

 

Edit to add: An example cleaning guide here


Edited by PhillPower2, 20 December 2017 - 12:06 PM.


#3 mightywiz

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Posted 20 December 2017 - 07:01 PM

that's crap about removing the battery, you just need to run your laptop on the battery once and awhile a deplete it and let it charge back up.   but it will shorten the life if you never let it run off the battery.

 

you need to verify you have sufficient air flow,  if your fan sounds like it's spinning fast and you cant feel much air moving, then the heatsink fins are probably blocked by lint & dirt.    or even if the fan is spinning at all.

 

and since your fan is spinning at over 3000 rpms I doubt it is broken, if a blade broke off if would not be spinning fast and they don't last long when a blade breaks off, usually other break off at the same time and the speed slows down.



#4 Boris_yo

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Posted 21 December 2017 - 12:15 AM

@PhillPower2
 
Have you noticed GPU temperature? Could it be main cause of high internal temperature?
 
I do not have HDD so sounds would not be coming off of it. I will try to see what I can clean inside. 
 
 
@mightywiz
 
My battery is so worn out that I will have to recharge it every 30 minutes. I just keep it there and use it as UPS so when power is down, I won't lose my work.
 
Do you know where I can get CPU fan for my laptop? I think it needs special model number for my laptop's model?


Edited by Boris_yo, 21 December 2017 - 12:15 AM.


#5 Boris_yo

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Posted 21 December 2017 - 06:48 AM

Update guys:

 

I have cleaned the inside and heatsink with cooler. Yes there was dust and dust stuck inside of some vent's fins. Regardless there is something that causes my system to operate at higher temperature. I have tracked it down and it is external monitor. Here is a screenshot of temperature levels with external monitor disabled and CPU operating in idle state:

 

Attached File  no-external-monitor_2017-12-21_13-25-20.jpg   45.92KB   0 downloads

 

Notice how fan is working at normal speed to maintain temperature?

 

Here'e a screenshot of temperature levels with external monitor enabled and CPU operating in idle state:

 

Attached File  external-monitor_2017-12-21_13-25-20.jpg   48.9KB   0 downloads

 

Notice how fan is working at high speeds to maintain temperature?

As soon as I enable external monitor fan starts working at high speed and never shifts down gear or turns off for short break like it does when external monitor is not connected.

 

The monitor is connected using HDMI output. Do you know if this is normal?


Edited by Boris_yo, 21 December 2017 - 06:52 AM.


#6 PhillPower2

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Posted 21 December 2017 - 10:10 AM

Take it that the Western Digital Caviar HDD we can see in your screenshot is an external USB device then Boris.

 

The GPU temp increasing is normal as it is being put under load when you are hooked up to the external display, the bigger the screen the harder the graphics chip needs to work to support the display 

 

that's crap about removing the battery, 

 

 

Everyone is entitled to opinion but it helps when a person can offer substance to support it, Boris had already said that the original 6 cell battery was worn out so there was no point on elaborating on it, especially when the battery concerned is around 6 years old.

 

FWIW Boris, below is my canned info for helping folk look after their notebook batteries, both newer and older types. 

 

To prolong the life expectancy of a notebook battery it should be allowed to run out of charge once in a while and then be fully recharged again, this is sometimes called exercising the battery.

It is not a good idea to use a notebook with both the battery and AC adapter/charger in place as it will shorten the life of the battery, this because the battery becomes reliant on being fully charged all of the time and so when the AC adapter/charger is removed the battery will quickly lose it`s charge, not all batteries do have but what many older ones do have is a memory cell (EEPROM) which stores the charge amount/content rating and this is often what becomes affected by continuous charging from the AC adapter/charger, typical symptoms may include not charging at all and only charging to a certain percentage and no further.

To exercise a removable notebook battery you should charge the battery to 100% when you are not going to be using the notebook away from a wall socket power outlet for an extended period of time, turn off and remove the AC adapter/charger and the battery, store the battery in a safe place, reconnect and use the AC adapter to power the notebook while you have access to a mains power socket, every once in a while (1 to 2 months) remove the AC adapter, replace the battery, use the notebook until the battery charge is depleted, connect the AC adapter/charger, charge the battery up to 100% and then repeat the very same steps as above.

Notebook and Netbook users who`s computers have integrated batteries should follow any guidelines provided by the manufacturer regarding best power management and settings but would benefit from once in a while allowing the battery to become empty of all charge by following the above steps, then fully charging the battery back up to 100% and then reverting back to the recommended power management steps that the manufacturer has suggested, these steps may include charging the battery up to 100% and then removing the AC adapter/charger, using the computer until the battery charge depletion level reaches the pre-set minimum allowed, reconnect the AC adapter/charger and then fully charge the battery up to 100% again and repeat the process.

Please note that the above will not help with a battery that has been damaged by being continuously connected to mains power or has reached it`s maximum charge amount limit/life expectancy.

If your notebook battery will not fully charge it suggests that it may be damaged or has been charged the maximum amount of times and so you should not allow it to lose all charge until you have a suitable replacement battery, this because a damaged or naturally expired battery may not begin to charge at all.

Some further information regarding how to prolong the life of a Notebook etc battery which includes calibrating it here



#7 britechguy

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Posted 21 December 2017 - 10:30 AM

Well, now I'll jump in going back to the original question.

 

While it never hurts to clean out a machine, and it's a good thing that this has been done, what is the "normal resting operating temperature" for a given example of a specific make and model can vary depending on not only what it's actively doing but (as has been discovered here) what peripherals are connected to it and how much "work" it takes to run them.  

 

The processor that was identified as being in this machine has a 100° C top *normal* operating temperature.  While one should never constantly be running at the top of the "within normal limits" operating temperature operating 30° C below it, at rest, is absolutely nothing to worry about.  The most one should do in that case is to give the machine a cleaning and see if it makes any difference.  Doing anything beyond that is gross overkill, particularly playing around with the CPU and its thermal paste.

 

It is always worth looking at cpu-world.com and/or your own CPU/APU manufacturer's spec sheets for your processor to see what the normal operating temperature range is and, if they publish it, what they consider the critical temperature where throttling occurs and where shutdown may occur if that temperature is maintained for whatever they consider "too long" or it's exceeded, even slightly.   The critical temperature is typically not one degree C above the maximum normal operating temperature, either.   


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#8 Boris_yo

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Posted 23 December 2017 - 10:32 PM

Submitted a reply a few days ago but website encountered MySql error.

 

@PhillPower2 I didn't know external monitor connection would increase that significantly internal temperature. Does it also matter what I am viewing on external monitor? Say browser with open website versus YouTube video would make difference? Actually does computer work twice as hard to render what's on external monitor?

 

@britechguy Since I had to dismantle heatsink and clean cooler, I had to reapply thermal grease again. I used 4-year old Arctic thermal grease and it seems it has preserved okay. I would blowing dust off greatly helped to stabilize CPU temperatures and not so much GPU temperatures.



#9 PhillPower2

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Posted 24 December 2017 - 05:41 AM

Browsing a webpage without any video content would be very little load, viewing video content in a webpage would increase the load streaming a video would further increase the load, by how much would depend on the notebooks hardware, example only, a quad core CPU, 8GB of RAM and a dedicated video chip would handle the load far better than a notebook that only had a dual core Celeron CPU with Intel HD 510 graphics and 8GB of RAM.

 

Also worth a mention on how things can differ, a notebook with a dedicated video chip that has it`s own cooling fan will fair far better than one that only has a heatsink that is dual cooled by the same fan as the CPU via a heat transfer pipe + keep in mind the size of the external display will also make a difference, far easier to fill a 21.6" screen with content than say a 32" HDMI TV screen.



#10 Boris_yo

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Posted 26 December 2017 - 12:54 AM

Also worth a mention on how things can differ, a notebook with a dedicated video chip that has it`s own cooling fan will fair far better than one that only has a heatsink that is dual cooled by the same fan as the CPU via a heat transfer pipe + keep in mind the size of the external display will also make a difference, far easier to fill a 21.6" screen with content than say a 32" HDMI TV screen.

 

Do you know whether it matters in terms of load whether I connect external monitor through VGA-out or HDMI-out from my laptop?

 

I have nVidia NVS 4200 dedicated chip with Optimus technology that works with primary Intel HD videochip. Optimus can facilitate work of nVidia as an auxiliary device for Intel HD. Like Voodoo 2 worked through SLI connection in 90s back then. I can select whether to have nVidia as primary or Intel HD but based on past exprience I set Intel HD as primary because nVidia chip burned on my original motherboard. Replacing it would cost almost the cost of motherboard itself so I bought and DIY'ed new motherboard. I don't want to enable nVidia chip as main due to concern above.


Edited by Boris_yo, 26 December 2017 - 12:56 AM.


#11 PhillPower2

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Posted 26 December 2017 - 05:42 AM

Better quality video but not sure it would lighten the load, same video device and same demand being placed on it.

 

I have nVidia NVS 4200 dedicated chip with Optimus technology that works with primary Intel HD videochip.

 

 

Aye switchable graphics, as you will know the NVS 4200 is intended for demanding use not the Intel HD,

 

I can select whether to have nVidia as primary or Intel HD but based on past exprience I set Intel HD as primary because nVidia chip burned on my original motherboard. 

 

 

Sorry to hear that, kind of defeats paying out for something that you know that you will not use though.

 

Have you tried the Nvidea chip just to see what the temps are.

 

Edit to correct typo.


Edited by PhillPower2, 26 December 2017 - 05:43 AM.


#12 Boris_yo

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Posted 27 December 2017 - 10:38 AM

Have you tried the Nvidea chip just to see what the temps are.

 

No I didn't... Not sure why nVidia chip burned but it left an assumption in me that previous motherboard or certain batch must have defective chips or something. That chip is located separately from CPU and Intel HD, kind of north east if I look on the bottom of laptop. If I look from the top of laptop then its location would be north west.

 

Maybe current motherboard does not belong to batch but what if it has that defect still and running nVidia is a matter of time before something hits the fan? So you are suggesting to switch to nVidia and sea how tempts are working? The problem is that motherboard's BIOS is not dual-BIOS so there is no fallback. There is also no fallback option if something happens to nVidia chip. It sounds like auxiliary video chip but the strange thing is that it does not appear to be main video chip. Otherwise if something happened to it, BIOS would only show Intel HD.

 

Did I mention that I still run on BIOS v02 when there's already BIOS v25 available for my laptop. I don't upgrade because I am affraid of failed flash procedure for who knows what reason. Maybe temperatures would be lower with flashing? Who knows... But for me it's about not trying to fix something that works...



#13 PhillPower2

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Posted 27 December 2017 - 11:33 AM

So you are suggesting to switch to nVidia and sea how tempts are working?

 

 

Exactly that, your computer and your peace of mind, if you try the Nvidea chip and the temps are lower but you decide to go back to the Intel HD only it will be you choice but you will at least know either way whether using the Intel HD is why things are getting hot.

 

It sounds like auxiliary video chip but the strange thing is that it does not appear to be main video chip. Otherwise if something happened to it, BIOS would only show Intel HD.

 

 

In case not already aware, to save power switchable graphics are designed to use the CPUs graphics when not under load, switch to the discreet GPU when gaming etc and then revert back to the CPUs graphics one the drops again.

 

What video devices are showing in Device Manager.

 

What OS are you running.

 

Did I mention that I still run on BIOS v02 when there's already BIOS v25 available for my laptop. I don't upgrade because I am affraid of failed flash procedure

 

 

That is the correct approach in most circumstances, only ever update the BIOS if it is to correct a known issue.

 

I only looked briefly but did not see any BIOS updates for your computer that mention anything related to overheating.






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