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What's best CPU for a Socket 478?


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#1 F-1DeskLamp

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Posted 19 December 2017 - 03:46 PM

I'm rebuilding a Sony Vaio VGN C240E Laptop, and I can't tell what the socket is exactly.  It has no CPU in it.  I found out the CPU was originally in it online, and I found a 478 and 479 socket are compatible.  I cannot find any information on the 479 socket however.  What's the difference between the two, and is that going to help me in way?

So I'm looking for the best CPU I can put into it, and what would that be do you think?  

 

 

Thanks



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#2 MadmanRB

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Posted 19 December 2017 - 04:30 PM

That laptop came with the Intel Core 2 Duo T5500 1.66G

 

I would say replace it with the same processor.

Core 2 duos are still very good processors.


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#3 F-1DeskLamp

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Posted 19 December 2017 - 04:41 PM

What about 64 bit capacity?  Can it do that?

What are my options for RAM?  Can I just give it DDR3, and be okay, or is it stuck in DDR2 or something?

I'm trying to "fluff it up" for the buyers.  ;0)  What would you do to supe it up?  



#4 MadmanRB

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Posted 19 December 2017 - 05:52 PM

Its DDR2 only

 

2GB of ram is its max but it is 64bit compliant.

 

For that kind of laptop with that kind of memory cap linux will be best option, probably puppy linux as anything heavy will bog it down.

Antix might work on it too but tell those who may buy it its not going to be good for windows applications as windows 10 may not work too well on it.

 

Its going to need a very base OS, linux here will be for the best.

 

Bodhi linux. linux lite, Lubuntu, puppy.

Whatever is lightweight.

 

Puppy linux gets my vote as it will come with firefox at the very least.


Edited by MadmanRB, 19 December 2017 - 05:58 PM.

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#5 F-1DeskLamp

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Posted 19 December 2017 - 06:08 PM

How about Peppermint?  



#6 F-1DeskLamp

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Posted 19 December 2017 - 06:10 PM

I was studying 32 and 64 bit differences, and they said that the cap on how much RAM that can go with 64 bit is virtually unlimited while the 32 bit is something like 4 or 6 GB of RAM.  

You are saying that it's a maximum of 2GB for that particular 64 bit chip, so why the difference?  



#7 MadmanRB

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Posted 19 December 2017 - 06:10 PM

How about Peppermint?  

I would try it.

 

I was studying 32 and 64 bit differences, and they said that the cap on how much RAM that can go with 64 bit is virtually unlimited while the 32 bit is something like 4 or 6 GB of RAM.  

You are saying that it's a maximum of 2GB for that particular 64 bit chip, so why the difference?  

 

 

This is a limitation of the motherboard and processor, 64bit kernels dont have limits but motherboards do.


Edited by MadmanRB, 19 December 2017 - 06:14 PM.

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#8 F-1DeskLamp

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Posted 19 December 2017 - 06:16 PM

LOL, now I'm bonking my own head.  I would never have dump money in the parts system if I the base had a teeny weeny top end for RAM capacity.  SMH

 

How do you always know what's the top end for RAM on a system?  Is there a way you can just look up the model number online, and see it in the specs?  Which spec am I looking at?

I know that if I look up a product, it will tell me that factory makes it with so much RAM, but on the other hand if I look it up somewhere else, it might say that the maximum is such and such.  

So I need to know when I'm seeing the factory RAM and the Max Capacity RAM.  And which specs where would tell me the difference?



#9 MadmanRB

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Posted 19 December 2017 - 06:21 PM

Well for older machines need not to worry, older processors are actually cheap and anything made before 2011 is really easy to get for a low amount of money.

You can get a new processor for that laptop for about $6 I mean if thats the only thing missing why not go for it.

 

As for my information sources again google is your friend, as long as you have the model number of something you are fine

 

Plenty of resources really such as the website for each brand, every company for legal reasons has to have a online record of old machines somewhere so if a recall happens they can tell you.

 

I got my information right from sonys mouth:

 

https://esupport.sony.com/US/p/model-home.pl?mdl=VGNC240E&LOC=3#/howtoTab


Edited by MadmanRB, 19 December 2017 - 06:22 PM.

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#10 F-1DeskLamp

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Posted 19 December 2017 - 06:35 PM

That's real good.  This is my kind of chat.  

Thanks



#11 F-1DeskLamp

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Posted 19 December 2017 - 08:38 PM

I forgot to ask, and I made note of your suggestion about that CPU that it comes with and the cheap used ones, but...

....I would like to know what is the general rule of thumb for comparing performance between CPU's whether they are of different sockets, different eras, different manufacturers, or any variable like that, so....

...I can drop down, and I can look at a list of all of the CPU's that fit in a socket on a system that I'm using, and I can see exactly which one is going to put the best performance in the system given all other spes like RAM limitations, type of mobo, and maybe even the budget of the client that's buying.  

 

I think that the higher the frequency the better it is, but is that always 100% true?  Also the more cores the better with more than 4 cores not applying to very many programs that are programmed to use more than 4 cores.  More threads are better, but up to what point?  What is the "cache" about, and how is that going to be more or less powerful depending on the cache rating?  

 

And can you explain the way to tell a 32 bit CPU and/or Mobo from a 64 bit CPU and/or Mobo?  And what does x86 and x64 imply about that.  Are there any other " x** " ratings or categories that I don't know about?  

 

 

I appreciate you time coming back with a reply to this topic.

Thanks



#12 MadmanRB

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Posted 19 December 2017 - 09:56 PM

I would like to know what is the general rule of thumb for comparing performance between CPU's whether they are of different sockets, different eras, different manufacturers, or any variable like that, so....

...I can drop down, and I can look at a list of all of the CPU's that fit in a socket on a system that I'm using, and I can see exactly which one is going to put the best performance in the system given all other spes like RAM limitations, type of mobo, and maybe even the budget of the client that's buying.  

 

My rule of thumb?

Always read the manual as most manufacturers will state what processor is compatible and what you can install on the machine.

 

Benchmarks really mean nothing if you are just making the best from old hardware so make sure that anything you wish to invest in is compatible.

 

Just check each make and model, do your homework on the manuals and see what the OEM suggests.

 

Just keep in mind there are factors such as BIOS to worry about, you dont wanrt to buy the highest end processor and not have it work now do you?

Some OEM's like HP and dell do funny things to the BIOS so that some processors work and others dont so keep in mind what BIOS version each machine is running, note down revision numbers to see if it is compliant.

Whatever parts you cant use just resell, its all you can do.

 

I think that the higher the frequency the better it is, but is that always 100% true?  Also the more cores the better with more than 4 cores not applying to very many programs that are programmed to use more than 4 cores.  More threads are better, but up to what point?  What is the "cache" about, and how is that going to be more or less powerful depending on the cache rating?  

 

There is a lot to digest here but frequency is not the only determining factor in a processor.

There are things like cache, clock speed, threads, cores and everything but each use case is different and will be suited for each need.

Now for cache and cores and other things about processors understanding it here are some videos:

 

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WUtYFG-TnFg

 

As for x64 vs x86:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IknbgnJLSRY


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