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Removing Win 10 reinstall Win 7


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#1 robobo

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Posted 18 December 2017 - 01:49 PM

My computer was working great with Win 7 Pro. I was bombarded with Win 10 upgrades. At some point, I slipped up and allowed the upgrade. I didn't like it and was intending to go back. It was unable to change settings on the incessant updates and one came along. After the upgrade, the computer would not boot. I tried everything I knew and could find, but no luck. Then, I have no idea how or why, I found a link called Windows repair. What a nightmare. In the end Win, 10 dominated and would not allow any return to the original. There is a constant problem with changing settings, unauthorize by me.

 

Presently, I am planning to reformat and clean install Win 7 Pro or Ultimate. I have about 8+ windows install disk, and while in the hospital, my wife decided to help me out with a good clean up. OH boy! Neatly stacked on a shelf are all the disks. Nearby neatly stacked is a pile of 'keys'. No indication of what belongs to what. Is there any way to determine which key goes to which disk? I really hate to give Microsoft any more of my money!!



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#2 JohnC_21

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Posted 18 December 2017 - 02:21 PM

First determine what version is installed. Next download the Ultimate PID checker. Input your key and look for one that matches your version. As long as the key was not activated on another computer it will activate. You may need to click on the different Windows versions the program provides to determine if the key is for 7 or 8.

 

http://www.softpedia.com/get/System/System-Info/The-Ultimate-PID-Checker.shtml



#3 mikey11

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Posted 18 December 2017 - 02:53 PM

you can create your own Windows 7 Pro installation software for free,

 

as long as you have your original windows 7 product code....look for a sticker on the computer



#4 britechguy

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Posted 18 December 2017 - 04:31 PM

What version of Windows 10 are you running?

 

The days of frequent settings changes during updates are past.  I haven't had a setting change in the last two feature updates (1703 & 1709) at least, and I don't think I did in 1607, either.

 

You would be far better off at least trying a clean install of Windows 10, after having backed up your machine with a system image and also making a separate copy of your user data.

 

There are lots of machines that had major issues when upgraded from an earlier version of Windows 7 to Windows 10, particularly in the early days (versions 1507 and 1511 in particular).  Many are cured entirely if Windows 10 is installed from scratch.

 

If you happen to be on a Version of Windows 10 earlier than the current one (Version 1709) then you could also use the instructions for Updating Windows 10 using the Windows 10 ISO file.  This comes close to a full reinstallation of Windows 10, but allowing you to keep both your user data and installed programs/apps if you so choose.  I've brought several problematic machines "back to life" using this technique.

 

The writing is on the wall for Windows 7 and 2020 is going to be here very, very soon.


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#5 dhagerjohns

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Posted 22 December 2017 - 07:44 PM

Is there any way to determine which key goes to which disk? I really hate to give Microsoft any more of my money!!

Yes, if you want to install Windows 7, do so.  When it asks for the key either put them in until one works, or skip, and try later.



#6 robobo

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Posted 22 December 2017 - 10:52 PM

My installed version of 10 is 1607, build 14393.1944

I would like to try upgrading to the latest version before I do anything else. I personally do not like the fact that There is no way to stop updates. I prefer to set so that I am notified and can choose when. Way too often I am in a hurry to go somewhere and shut the computer down. Suddenly there is a blue screen telling not to turn the computer off because there are 189 updates to install. Drives me nuts. robob



#7 dhagerjohns

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Posted 22 December 2017 - 11:20 PM

My installed version of 10 is 1607, build 14393.1944

I would like to try upgrading to the latest version before I do anything else. I personally do not like the fact that There is no way to stop updates. I prefer to set so that I am notified and can choose when. Way too often I am in a hurry to go somewhere and shut the computer down. Suddenly there is a blue screen telling not to turn the computer off because there are 189 updates to install. Drives me nuts. robob

That is on Windows 7.  You will never have that on Windows 10.  You can choose, shutdown, update and restart, or restart.  Also you only have ONE cumulative update.  Windows 7 was notorious for days worth of updating.



#8 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 23 December 2017 - 06:41 AM

My installed version of 10 is 1607, build 14393.1944

I would like to try upgrading to the latest version before I do anything else. I personally do not like the fact that There is no way to stop updates. I prefer to set so that I am notified and can choose when. Way too often I am in a hurry to go somewhere and shut the computer down. Suddenly there is a blue screen telling not to turn the computer off because there are 189 updates to install. Drives me nuts. robob

 

 

Man, you are running an ancient version of Windows 10, you have missed over a years worth of critical updates. If I were you I would perform a clean install of Windows 10 and see how that works for you. It is very quick and easy to perform a clean install and this process usually eliminates many of the ghosts that are in the system.


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#9 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 23 December 2017 - 07:02 AM

My installed version of 10 is 1607, build 14393.1944

I would like to try upgrading to the latest version before I do anything else. I personally do not like the fact that There is no way to stop updates. I prefer to set so that I am notified and can choose when. Way too often I am in a hurry to go somewhere and shut the computer down. Suddenly there is a blue screen telling not to turn the computer off because there are 189 updates to install. Drives me nuts. robob

 

 

Although I have been on Windows 10 for over 3 years I have never experienced this but I use to see it on Windows 7 all the time. I still see on Linux because I multi-boot. Just the other day I woke up and my Linux install needed over 600 updates.


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#10 britechguy

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Posted 23 December 2017 - 10:39 AM

If you wish to jump directly to Version 1709 and the latest build without doing a clean install then follow these instructions for Updating Windows 10 using the Windows 10 ISO file.

 

It has worked perfectly each and every time I've used this technique.

 

I had to use it recently on my two brand-new HP laptops that arrived with Version 1511 pre-installed on them.  The jump directly to 1709 was simple using those instructions.


Edited by britechguy, 23 December 2017 - 10:40 AM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#11 JohnC_21

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Posted 23 December 2017 - 12:26 PM

 

My installed version of 10 is 1607, build 14393.1944

I would like to try upgrading to the latest version before I do anything else. I personally do not like the fact that There is no way to stop updates. I prefer to set so that I am notified and can choose when. Way too often I am in a hurry to go somewhere and shut the computer down. Suddenly there is a blue screen telling not to turn the computer off because there are 189 updates to install. Drives me nuts. robob

That is on Windows 7.  You will never have that on Windows 10.  You can choose, shutdown, update and restart, or restart.  Also you only have ONE cumulative update.  Windows 7 was notorious for days worth of updating.

 

Windows 7 has gone to one cumulative update since last year. Separate Updates are no longer offered. Personally I hate it because one bad update in the package can break something but you have no idea which one.

 

https://www.computerworld.com/article/3240973/microsoft-windows/one-year-later-enterprises-still-wrestle-with-windows-7s-cumulative-updates.html


Edited by JohnC_21, 23 December 2017 - 12:30 PM.


#12 dhagerjohns

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Posted 23 December 2017 - 12:32 PM

 

 

My installed version of 10 is 1607, build 14393.1944

I would like to try upgrading to the latest version before I do anything else. I personally do not like the fact that There is no way to stop updates. I prefer to set so that I am notified and can choose when. Way too often I am in a hurry to go somewhere and shut the computer down. Suddenly there is a blue screen telling not to turn the computer off because there are 189 updates to install. Drives me nuts. robob

That is on Windows 7.  You will never have that on Windows 10.  You can choose, shutdown, update and restart, or restart.  Also you only have ONE cumulative update.  Windows 7 was notorious for days worth of updating.

 

Windows 7 has gone to one cumulative update since last year. Separate Updates are no longer offered. Personally I hate it because one bad update in the package can break something but you have no idea which one.

 

https://www.computerworld.com/article/3240973/microsoft-windows/one-year-later-enterprises-still-wrestle-with-windows-7s-cumulative-updates.html

 

I have never had a bad update.



#13 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 23 December 2017 - 12:44 PM

 

 

 

My installed version of 10 is 1607, build 14393.1944

I would like to try upgrading to the latest version before I do anything else. I personally do not like the fact that There is no way to stop updates. I prefer to set so that I am notified and can choose when. Way too often I am in a hurry to go somewhere and shut the computer down. Suddenly there is a blue screen telling not to turn the computer off because there are 189 updates to install. Drives me nuts. robob

That is on Windows 7.  You will never have that on Windows 10.  You can choose, shutdown, update and restart, or restart.  Also you only have ONE cumulative update.  Windows 7 was notorious for days worth of updating.

 

Windows 7 has gone to one cumulative update since last year. Separate Updates are no longer offered. Personally I hate it because one bad update in the package can break something but you have no idea which one.

 

https://www.computerworld.com/article/3240973/microsoft-windows/one-year-later-enterprises-still-wrestle-with-windows-7s-cumulative-updates.html

 

I have never had a bad update.

 

 

 

I have but it was on openSUSE.


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#14 britechguy

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Posted 23 December 2017 - 12:47 PM

I have never had a bad update.

 

 

 

 

 

I've also only had one, and that's been within the Windows 10 era and when my machine was in the first cohort (as in applied on release day) for that cumulative update.

 

With the advent of system health telemetry the fix to that bad update was pushed out to my machine within 3 days.   I wouldn't go back to the "old system" if you paid me.  I would also be thrilled, if I were still running a Windows 7 machine, that significant parts of the Windows 10 update and monitoring paradigms were rolled out for Windows 7 (and 8/8.1).


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#15 dc3

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Posted 23 December 2017 - 12:49 PM

I have never had a bad update.

I'm going to take wild guess that you mean that you've never had a problem with a update.  Sometimes you just get lucky.  I hadn't experienced any problems with updates until the authors fall update 1709, but both of those problems pretty much resolved themselves with a minor adjustment.  Some of these problems will just get it sorted out after a few days.  The wife's computer has the same updates and has had no problems at all.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 





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