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How Do I Install Linux But Keep Windows?


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12 replies to this topic

#1 ryan_w_quick

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Posted 26 September 2006 - 02:37 PM

I am new to Linux, and some of my friends told me that if I want to get into it I should try Mandriva. I got the disc and everything, but can any one point me to a link or tutorial that may help me in working through partitioning windows so that I can keep windows. cause I don't just want to abandon it.
"To do less than your best is to sacrifice the gift." Steve Prefontaine

"The things you own end up owning you." Tyler Durden

"I do not feel obliged to believe that the same god who has endowed us with sense, reason and intellect has intended us to forgo their use." Galileo

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#2 cybormoron

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Posted 26 September 2006 - 08:26 PM

maybe this
http://www.mandrake.tips.4.free.fr/installmdv2006.html
I can no longer sit back and allow Microsoft infiltration, Microsoft indoctrination, Microsoft subversion, and the international Microsoft conspiracy to sap and impurify all of our precious open source GNU/Linux operating systems. General Jack D. Ripper.

#3 acidburned

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Posted 27 September 2006 - 12:44 AM

you can check here also http://www.howtoforge.com/windows_linux_dual_boot and here http://www.linux.com/article.pl?sid=06/07/20/1654251

#4 ryan_w_quick

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Posted 27 September 2006 - 01:04 PM

Here's what I decided. I am upgrading to XP Pro and I will just set up virtual pc and run some different OS from there. Once I get comfortable enough I will try partitioning my harddrive.

The two linux that I most want to try are Red Hat and Mandriva. (I am at Purdue University in Indiana for EE and I will have to learn Red Hat in about 4 months). Will virtual pc run these two OK?
"To do less than your best is to sacrifice the gift." Steve Prefontaine

"The things you own end up owning you." Tyler Durden

"I do not feel obliged to believe that the same god who has endowed us with sense, reason and intellect has intended us to forgo their use." Galileo

#5 Yourhighness

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Posted 27 September 2006 - 01:55 PM

Hey,
I posted this somewhere else in this forum so i just copy paste: http://vpc.visualwin.com/
have a look at it, it might help.

rgds,

YH

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#6 ComputerWhizz7

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Posted 28 September 2006 - 04:54 AM

Yeap there is no problem using a virtual pc to test out these operating systems. It is safer to do it this way because if you don't know what you are doing and muck up the partitioning your computer might not even boot.

Have fun with Linux. I would also try out SUSE Linux.
I came, I saw, I conquered. - Julius Caeser

#7 ryan_w_quick

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Posted 28 September 2006 - 07:07 PM

O.K. The virtual PC worked great except for one thing. All of the .iso files (3 of them, I am running Mandriva 2006 Free) boot up great and install everything but the server portions of the pack in about 40-50 minutes. The only problem that I run into is that Mandriva cannot detect my graphics card (Nvidia GeForce 6800, even though it is an explicit option in the list of choices) or my sound card. I don't really care about the sound right now though. The video card problem however is really a problem. When I check properties in the virtual pc, it tries saying that I am only running 4MB of video memory. What ends up happening when Mandriva boots up is that the resolution goes horrible due to the lack of video memory.

If this problem is due to using Virtual PC to boot Linux, then I suppose that I will break down and spend $20 for the Partition Magic made by Symantec. But if this can be corrected in virtual pc, I would rather do that.

Can someone please help me resolve this issue?

Thanx
"To do less than your best is to sacrifice the gift." Steve Prefontaine

"The things you own end up owning you." Tyler Durden

"I do not feel obliged to believe that the same god who has endowed us with sense, reason and intellect has intended us to forgo their use." Galileo

#8 cybormoron

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Posted 28 September 2006 - 08:38 PM

i would hold off on buying PM. 2 reasons;
1. the partitioning tools that come with all linux cd's are recommended. linux tools are better for working with linux. in my opinion the tool that is on the mandriva cd is the best there is. it's called diskdrake.

2. i would think that if it isn't working that going ahead with an installation may not solve the problem.

sorry i don't know much about running linux in virtual pc. is that a microsoft product? there could be a hardware compatibility issue here. mandriva may not recognize your monitor/video card combination correctly. or maybe we just need to find the right boot option.

my recommendation would be to try another distro. a live cd. it is better to run a live cd because they don't touch your hard drive and you get see if there's a hardware compatibility issue before you install. if one distro doesn't run then try another distro. for example; i couldn't run slack based distros on this machine. they froze up but other distros are great. if downloading is a problem then maybe you can get a friend or the library to do it. sometimes there are problems getting started with linux but it really is worth the effort.

you can get a live cd of mandriva. it's called mandriva one.
http://www.mandriva.com/en/download

some great distros to try out
http://www.knoppix.com/
http://www.pclinuxos.com/news.php
http://www.mepis.org/
http://www.ubuntu.com/

here's a small one. about 50 MB
http://www.damnsmalllinux.org/

another small one and a favorite around here
http://www.puppylinux.com/

this one is hot stuff. i'm gonna put this on my other machine.
http://www.sabayonlinux.org/

Edited by cybormoron, 28 September 2006 - 08:38 PM.

I can no longer sit back and allow Microsoft infiltration, Microsoft indoctrination, Microsoft subversion, and the international Microsoft conspiracy to sap and impurify all of our precious open source GNU/Linux operating systems. General Jack D. Ripper.

#9 ryan_w_quick

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Posted 29 September 2006 - 12:49 AM

OK. I decided to try a different distro in microsoft virtual pc. I used Fedora. Everything was going great, all five disks installed perfectly, rebooted, configuration completed. But, once all that is out of the way and the OS is really starting for the first time, my resolution gets reallllllly bad and I can't do a thing but shut down virtual pc and restart.

Three possibilities that I can see, which one is right, or is something else going on?

1) My hardware is not very compatible with any Linux OS, especially my graphics card, which I would find hard to believe since I am running a pretty popular NVidia GeForce 6800.

2) Virtual PC is preventing any OS that I emulate from recognizing my video card.

3) If I just need to install a video card in command line linux before starting in graphic mode. I've heard that the graphics drivers for NVidia can be awful to install in some Linux (mainly SUSE). If this is the problem, I would need detailed instructions on how to fix the problem because I am a pretty big noob with Linux.

So, no matter what the problem is I just need someone to help me. I will take any steps necessary to get a system that runs Linux. I would even go buy a new PC if necessary. Please and thank you, I need help.

Cheers,

Ryan
"To do less than your best is to sacrifice the gift." Steve Prefontaine

"The things you own end up owning you." Tyler Durden

"I do not feel obliged to believe that the same god who has endowed us with sense, reason and intellect has intended us to forgo their use." Galileo

#10 cybormoron

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Posted 30 September 2006 - 08:54 PM

hi ryan...i would guess that virtual pc may be the problem so why don't we eliminate virtual pc from the equation here? there's 2 other ways to run linux that i know that don't require installation.

1. vmware player. same as virtual pc (i think, but i don't know what virtual pc is) and it's free. vmware released it as free to compete with virtual pc i believe. this is probably your best option. works like this; get the vmware player software and install it. you then need something called a "virtual machine". the virtual machine is the distro or operating system that runs in the vm player. you can even make your own virtual machine with the paid for version. there are community virtual machines available. the primary one they recommend is called "browser appliance". this is actually ubuntu. they have other great software but it's not free. make sure you read the instructions on how to run this. it's pretty easy actually.
http://www.vmware.com/

here's some screenshots i took running different virtual machines on my xp. they're a bit old because i haven't used my windows in about a year.

the browser appliance, ubuntu running on my desktop. i have dual monitors so pay no attention to my background wallpaper, loool. this one shows the vm player/ubuntu on top, adobe reader open to the instructions, firefox. on the right monitor is windows explorer open to the folder i have all of my virtual machines in.
http://img84.imageshack.us/img84/9332/vm22kfuj5.jpg

using firefox in vmplayer/ubuntu
http://img167.imageshack.us/img167/5251/vm37uofp6.jpg

debian
http://img101.imageshack.us/img101/2043/vmdebian8pudc2.jpg

damn small linux
http://img246.imageshack.us/img246/5407/vm...jan063nlez5.jpg

fedora
http://img135.imageshack.us/img135/4411/vmfedora4tgin7.jpg

openbsd
http://img92.imageshack.us/img92/7683/vmopenbsd0ppcq4.jpg

suse
http://img135.imageshack.us/img135/7281/vmsuse5qdfi9.jpg

these all work great. i think there's even a way to save data.

2. the only other option is to run a live cd to test if a particular distro works on your computer.

hth

Edited by cybormoron, 30 September 2006 - 09:02 PM.

I can no longer sit back and allow Microsoft infiltration, Microsoft indoctrination, Microsoft subversion, and the international Microsoft conspiracy to sap and impurify all of our precious open source GNU/Linux operating systems. General Jack D. Ripper.

#11 masterofmind1969

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Posted 11 February 2007 - 04:06 PM

SUSE linux is better to try out it's a lot easier and works better.

#12 arcman

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Posted 11 February 2007 - 04:55 PM

A virtual PC or other emulated environment is only going to give you so much in terms of hardware compatibility because you're using a software environment for the OS to run in. Anything running in virutal won't have any real access to your video card or any other of your present hardware.

I'd also recommend using a Live CD like Knoppix, Suse, or one of the Ubuntu distributions. If you find one that works well that you like, you can go ahead and partition your hard drive for a dual boot system, which a lot of the live CDs can do on the fly, like Ubuntu/Kubuntu.
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#13 karno7

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Posted 12 February 2007 - 05:44 PM

Your all forgetting about Ark Linux! Very easy to use and doesn't require any where near as much as Ubuntu.
http://www.arklinux.org




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