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Unsigned Driver Questions


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#1 TCSNinc

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 08:58 PM

Sorry to bump an old topic but felt my concern is somewhat relevant

 

I'm running Win 8.1 64 bit but have an unsigned driver from 7/7/1999 in one of my program folders

You have to unhide critical system files to see it

It too is named with a string of random numbers and letters

 

1. I'm under the impression these types of files connect to a remote registry on someone else's PC out there in the webs, am I correct?

2. Can I delete this?



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#2 joseibarra

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Posted 14 December 2017 - 04:36 AM

If you are running Windows 8.x why are you posting in the XP forum instead of the Windows 8.x forum which is here:

 

https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/f/209/windows-8-and-windows-81/

 

 

For Windows XP and those peculiar folder names here is an interesting explanation:

 

When some programs (including Microsoft programs) install things, it may create a temporary folder consisting of 20-30 random letters and numbers or random numbers and letters in the root drive of the volume with the most free space.

This explains why sometimes the folders are on your C drive or on some might be on another drive - which one has the most free space?

For example you may see a folder similar to or called:

D:\9470bb12e8a4f3447657236478e41c5

There may be other folders and files under that main temporary folder such as amd64 and i386.

These should normally be removed when the installation is complete, but sometimes they are not - especially if the installation fails.  They are harmless but annoying.  

You may think something is wrong when there is not or be afraid the files are really needed.  To avoid confusion you can delete the temporary folders.

If your installation failed or the installation does not delete the randomly named folder when it completes running and you run the installation again, the installation again will make another randomly named folder.  Sometimes you will see several folder like this and they can all be deleted.

You may be able to identify the installation (for curiosity) by looking at some of the folder contents and decide if that installation was okay, just delete the files/folders.  If the installation did not work properly for some reason, running the installation again will just create a new randomly named temporary folder so the old temporary folder is really of no use.

Sometimes the folders are stubborn to delete.  Even if you are an Administrator on the system you may get a "sharing violation", "access denied", "being used" or similar type message when trying to remove the temporary folders.  Installations sometimes use different permissions than a regular user with Administrator group might have.

There are many methods to try to remove the folders and some involve third party programs to install or changing certain Windows settings that may compromise your system security if you don't change them back when you are done.

Booting your system in Safe Mode (pressing the F8 key repeatedly right before XP tries to load) is a good first method to try and remove the folders since it doesn't involve making any changes to your system configuration or downloading any third party programs.

If you are running XP Home, the next section regarding turning off "Simple File Sharing" does not apply to you since in XP Home, Simple File Sharing is always on.  If you are running XP Home, skip the next few paragraphs and resume where it says:

"If none of the above work a popular third party tool called Unlocker" is helpful.

If you don't feel like messing around with your Security settings, just skip to the next section that begins with:

"If none of the above work try a popular third part tool called Unlocker".

If Safe Mode does not work you can change the security of the folder when booting in Normal Mode to give your user Full Control over the folders by browsing to it in Explorer, click Tools, Folder Options, View and in the Advanced settings window, uncheck (at the very bottom of the list) Use simple file sharing (Recommended), and click OK.  This turns off the recommended simple file sharing on your computer so you will want to turn it back on when you are finished doing whatever you are doing.

Right click the folder(s) of interest, Properties and click the now visible Security tab.  Alter the Properties however you need to (for example, Select your user name and check the box to allow Full Control), click OK to apply the changes.

With the Use simple file sharing enabled (Recommended) box checked the folder Properties tabs are:

General, Sharing, Customize

With the Use simple file sharing disabled (Recommended) box UNchecked, the folder Properties tabs are:

General, Security, Customize

Now try to manipulate/delete the folder.

It is a good idea to go back into Explorer and put the check back in the box for Use simple file sharing (Recommended) when you have finished doing whatever you are doing.

 

 

If none of the above work, try a popular third party tool called Unlocker.  Unlocker will work for any version of XP.

Unlocker can be downloaded from here:

https://www.iobit.com/en/iobit-unlocker.php#

You may need to use Internet Explorer to get Unlocker to download properly.

Do not be tempted to download any other software that promises some miracle on your system.  Just download the correct Unlocker for your system (either 32 bit or 64 bit).

Pay attention when installing Unlocker since it wants to add a bunch of options, addons, shortcuts, and other extras you don't need, for example:

UNcheck the box to install the Babylon Toolbar and click Next
UNcheck the box to Check for Unlocker updates
UNcheck the box to install the Unlocker Assistant

DO check the box to install the Explorer Shell extension (you are going to need that)

Click Install, you do not need to reboot.

The reason you need to add the Explorer Shell Extension is so when you right click on the offending folder, you will have an Unlocker option to choose.    Explorer Shell Extensions help make up the right click menu when you look at a file or folder.

Right click one of the offending folders and choose Unlocker, then choose the Action (that would be delete) and click OK and you should see a Success message and the folder should be gone.

I would just install Unlocker long enough to clean up those leftovers and then, I then generally use Add/Remove Programs to uninstall Unlocker and all parts of it.  You can always install it again some other day if you need to.

Unlocker can be uninstalled when you are finished using it.

Reboot when you are finished to be sure the annoying folders are really gone.
 


The mediocre teacher tells. The good teacher explains. The superior teacher demonstrates.


#3 jcgriff2

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Posted 16 December 2017 - 09:34 PM

Sorry to bump an old topic but felt my concern is somewhat relevant
 
I'm running Win 8.1 64 bit but have an unsigned driver from 7/7/1999 in one of my program folders
You have to unhide critical system files to see it
It too is named with a string of random numbers and letters
 
1. I'm under the impression these types of files connect to a remote registry on someone else's PC out there in the webs, am I correct?
2. Can I delete this?


I doubt that it's connecting to anyone's computer.

The file name itself is likely in hexadecimal notation; hence the reason for seemingly random numbers and letters.

I'm sure it's OK to delete, but just in case one of your older apps is using it - rename it first. Add "aaaaa" (or whatever) to the front of the directory/file name; wait a few days, then delete it.

If you run into problems deleting it, let us know.

Regards. . .

jcgriff2
Microsoft MVP 2009-2015
Microsoft Windows Insider MVP 2018 - Present




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