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How Can Anyone Break the Locktite Solution on Laptop Screws?


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#1 F-1DeskLamp

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Posted 10 December 2017 - 07:07 PM

I have a laptop that obviously has either too strong of locktite on the screws, or it has too much.  How to I break then loose without damaging the shell?  

It seems like they are so tight that when I tried to break two of them loose already that screw bases came loose, so now the screws just spin in place. 



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#2 boopme

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Posted 10 December 2017 - 07:19 PM

Hi, I would try a couple drops of Penetrating oil or a heat gun. You need to be very careful with the gun. You can also try Tapping the back end of the screw driver gently to crack the seal. twisting as you tap.
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#3 britechguy

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Posted 10 December 2017 - 07:45 PM

For those two that just spin in place I'd presume that, for all practical intents and purposes, they're free anyway if the screw-in base has become detached from the motherboard.

 

If you're lucky, after getting the case off, you'll be able to separate the screw from the screw-in base and glue the base back in place.

 

I've only ever had this happen once, with a single screw on a laptop.  QA must have been asleep that day, probably a Friday!


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#4 F-1DeskLamp

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Posted 10 December 2017 - 09:31 PM

I just bought a tube of epoxy putty today to re-establish the screw bases back to the shell.  I'm in luck.   :whistle:



#5 OldPhil

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 08:52 AM

What I found that works it to use one of those small hobby leather/solder irons, I let it get hot then carefully hold the tip against the screw head for a few seconds.  I am careful making sure not to allow contact with the plastic.  Sometimes I have to reheat but most time they come out on the first shot.

 

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#6 F-1DeskLamp

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 09:39 AM

What I found that works it to use one of those small hobby leather/solder irons, I let it get hot then carefully hold the tip against the screw head for a few seconds.  I am careful making sure not to allow contact with the plastic.  Sometimes I have to reheat but most time they come out on the first shot.

 

Phil

 

I was thinking that too.  

That works for a stuck screw I'm sure.  How about for ones that has its base nut broken loose from the shell mount it was molded into on the inside of the laptop?  I have a few screws that just spin, and I can't put any pliers on the base nut inside because...it's on the inside.  



#7 Joe C

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 12:55 PM

well if they just spin, they are no longer connected to the base of the laptop, so the top will pop up while they are still in there, after you remove the top, you can access and remove the screw base from the screw. Epoxy the screw base back onto the bottom



#8 F-1DeskLamp

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 01:02 PM

well if they just spin, they are no longer connected to the base of the laptop, so the top will pop up while they are still in there, after you remove the top, you can access and remove the screw base from the screw. Epoxy the screw base back onto the bottom

 

I don't think that's right.

These screws don't screw into the plastic on the other side.  They screw into a kind of nut like a bolt and nut.  They mold that nut into the plastic of the laptop case, and what happens is that the nut breaks free of that plastic mold.  

The result is that when you try to turn the screw, the nut inside on that screw spins when the nut has to be stopped in place in order to allow the screw to twist out of it.  

Is that clear?  

 

Thanks



#9 OldPhil

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 01:17 PM

An idea I had awhile back was to  take a wire gauge drill and drill at an angle into the retainer nut then insert a wire  into the hole which should stop the retainer from rotating.  This is something that only a person with good mechanical skills should undertake.  I have near 50 years of working on intricate things and the commensurate tools.

 

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#10 mjd420nova

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 01:21 PM

Those brass inserts in the plastic case can be a pain.  when the spin loose, the cover or whatever can be removed and the insert held with pliers to get the screw loose.  Replacing the insert in the plastic with a little epoxy and added heat will get it remounted in the plastic.  Often the plastic stud that holds the insert gets fractured and wont hold the insert anymore.  Sometimes I've used scrap plastic and an old soldering iron to place the insert in place and remould  the plastic around it.  Usually just replace the whole plastic case piece.



#11 F-1DeskLamp

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 03:12 PM

An idea I had awhile back was to  take a wire gauge drill and drill at an angle into the retainer nut then insert a wire  into the hole which should stop the retainer from rotating.  This is something that only a person with good mechanical skills should undertake.  I have near 50 years of working on intricate things and the commensurate tools.

 

Phil

 

Anything is possible for whoever has the most tools.  

I bet that something that can penetrate that plastic and brass at that angle as hair like as is narrowly necessary is not a cheap tool.  Too rare to be mass produced, and it probably doesn't make much sense business wise for me at this phase.  

 

Thanks



#12 F-1DeskLamp

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 03:19 PM

Those brass inserts in the plastic case can be a pain.  when the spin loose, the cover or whatever can be removed and the insert held with pliers to get the screw loose.  Replacing the insert in the plastic with a little epoxy and added heat will get it remounted in the plastic.  Often the plastic stud that holds the insert gets fractured and wont hold the insert anymore.  Sometimes I've used scrap plastic and an old soldering iron to place the insert in place and remould  the plastic around it.  Usually just replace the whole plastic case piece.

 

What does the heat do to the epoxy that it doesn't do already without heat?  

And if you remove the shell before removing that brass inserts, then aren't you pulling the brass inserts through the plastic shell?  

I was thinking that is what I'll have to do, and I was thinking that to do it I'll need a clean penetration as it exits through the shell, so some kind of heating device to melt precisely around the screw and brass insert without cracking or augmenting the whole beyond what is necessary......would be nice.  

 

So maybe some kind of steel tubing like maybe a broad syringe needle if they make them that broad heated by the solderer could reach around the diameter of the screw and brass insert on the other side, then seer through the plastic like butter knife.  

 

Then take the putty epoxy, and fill in the hole.  Sand off the outcrops and slag.  Drill the new hole for the screw.  Cover with liquid epoxy or superglue to give a sheen look, and fill the epoxy with the color of ink that matches the outer shell the best, so that the repair material matches as best as possible under glossy sheen.  



#13 Joe C

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 03:49 PM

 

well if they just spin, they are no longer connected to the base of the laptop, so the top will pop up while they are still in there, after you remove the top, you can access and remove the screw base from the screw. Epoxy the screw base back onto the bottom

 

  They mold that nut into the plastic of the laptop case, and what happens is that the nut breaks free of that plastic mold.  

The result is that when you try to turn the screw, the nut inside on that screw spins when the nut has to be stopped in place in order to allow the screw to twist out of it.  

Is that clear?  

 

Thanks

 

That little brass threaded barrel thing alway's breaks the plastic from the bottom base that holds it in place. I've never seen one that stays locked down and just spins inside, the plastic is not thick enough to keep the brass nut from breaking out

 

laptop_nut.jpg


Edited by Joe C, 13 December 2017 - 03:57 PM.


#14 F-1DeskLamp

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 04:19 PM

@Joe C

 

I see.  So it's common, and there is more of that problem to come.

What brands is that common in, and is it limited to certain series or brand wide....or industry wide?

If it is so common, I wonder if there isn't a way to mass produce a solution.  The Original Makers like that because they practice obsolescence which means they shrink the aftermarkets like repair and resale that diminish their sales.  

I kind of doubt that a mass produced solution to sell to repair artists is possible given all of the different nooks and crannies those are placed into, but if someone here has seen enough of them to know better than that, I suggest designing it out of a material and adhesive methodology, and then investing in a big load of them.  If you can't afford the initial run, then find someone that can, and break off some of the profit.  It would not take long for all of the manufacturers to jump onto something so simple, and dilute the pricing power and market share, but maybe for a few goes at it at first it's a certain profit.  

 

What do you think?



#15 mightywiz

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 04:21 PM

if the nut spins in the plastic then it should pull out just as easy, then use some epoxy putty and put it back in place with the screw, screwed into it so the putty doesn't push up through the center of the nut.  let it set overnight and put the unit back together and don't over tighten the screws and you'll be good to go.






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