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Best PC Desktop Manufacturer/Vendor Support


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#1 Measure for Measure

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Posted 10 December 2017 - 05:43 PM

The only recent and granular review of tech support is by Laptop magazine: I figure these scores will apply to desktops as well. They give a 60% weight to the website and 40% weight to phone support. (I tried giving the web score an even stronger 70% weight, but it didn't change the ordering).

Apple comes out on top. Acer and Lenovo follow.

Microsoft and HP trail.

Dell is after that.

Asus is last among the majors.

Consumer Reports thinks Apple provides excellent phone support and very good online support. Dell, Lenovo, HP, ASUS, Samsung, Acer, and Toshiba receive poor marks in both categories. PC World used to have a great tech support survey, but that was a while ago.  

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According to Consumer Reports, the estimated 3 year breakage rate for Apples is 13%. For ASUS, Dell, Acer, Lenovo and HP it's in the 23-26% range. Differences of less than 4 points aren't meaningful, so call it a tie with HP trailing in last. So for windows PCs, I'd assume computer problems will happen and focus on tech support quality.

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This 2015 article said Lenovo was worst for bloatware (eg Superfish) with HP not far behind. Dell got better marks. Removing bloatware typically isn't difficult, but I found it time consuming to distinguish between needed/helpful software and crap. Someone here recommends simply reinstalling the OS, but I'm guessing that might void the warranty. One vendor told me that adding a data partition would do that , for example.

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Specialist manufacturers offer silent PCs and the ambitious can build their own. One commentor recommends putting the PC in a separate room and feeding 15 foot wires to the monitor, keyboard and mouse. Or buy a laptop! This 2012 article recommends Apples, ASUS and Lenovos. It says that Dell and HP computers tend to be noisier.

In terms of worldwide PC shipments, HP and Lenovo are on top (20-22% each). Dell trails in 3rd place (15-16%). ASUS, Apple and  Acer are tied for 4th (7-8% each). Wiki page.
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#2 AnythingButMalware

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Posted 10 December 2017 - 06:02 PM

You can easily beat bloatware by using PC Decrapifier, re-installing the OS is not needed. I couldn't really imagine why that was even suggested.

Have you tried turning it off and back on? :P


#3 Measure for Measure

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Posted 10 December 2017 - 06:17 PM

I had a good experience with PC Decrapifier a couple of years back. I recall though that the whole de-bloatware process took me a while, probably due to FUD.

----

 

Those interested in viewing an ethical comparison of the various PC vendors can go here:

http://www.thegoodshoppingguide.com/ethical-pcs-laptops-tablets/

 

Acer and Asus do well under their criteria. Apple, Lenovo and HP are ranked at the bottom.



#4 MadmanRB

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Posted 10 December 2017 - 07:14 PM

For me anyone who reccomends apple is full of crap.

Apple only will give you the most worthless hardware for the highest prices because they are apple. (I hate apple with a passion BTW)

For me the best overall pre made vendor Dell is prboably the most well rounded, while not perfect and they have had spotty customer support they still have great products.

Asus can be funny

Lenovo can also be funny

 

But want the best PC maker?

look in the mirror sometime.

 

Honestly people make a big deal over PC building and really its not that bad.

People think its complicated, that you need a degree in IT or something.

But really its not that hard to build a PC.

If one really must go pre built there are plenty of smaller companies that do good for the money.

Origin

CyberpowerPC

Puget systems

CLX

Heck even ZaReason and system 76 are good options

Sure pricing for most of these companies are high but most are built with far more TLC then some crap $300 HP PC from best buy

 

I am a big fan of Origin and Puget, both have a lot of good workers on hand.


Edited by MadmanRB, 10 December 2017 - 07:22 PM.

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#5 Guest_Joe C_*

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Posted 10 December 2017 - 08:20 PM

The best desktop I've ever owned is the one I built myself



#6 MadmanRB

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Posted 11 December 2017 - 08:31 AM

Indeed, I mean yes if one has to pre builts can be good.

Maingear is another good option and dont really have massive overhead prices like those found at Origin or Puget.

I just like Origin a lot as its a company anyone who knows how to build a PC can work for, I thought about working for them but got to work on my communication skills.


Edited by MadmanRB, 11 December 2017 - 08:34 AM.

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#7 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 18 December 2017 - 06:06 PM

Sometimes you can get lucky and find a smallish local business that builds good computers and has a good record for service. I have one within a forty minute drive who has been supplying virtually all my components since I started building my own computers in the mid '90s. They also have a range of pre-builts which I have persuaded several friends to buy and none of them have had a hardware problem apart from a CD drive that just died. Their response to that was "It happens, here's another !"

 

But as has been said above, building your own is not hard if you own a couple of cross-head screw drivers and have the ability to read and follow a manual. It looks a lot more complicated than it is and there is a real satisfaction in connecting the last component, pressing the power button and watching it burst into life !

 

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Edited by Chris Cosgrove, 18 December 2017 - 06:07 PM.

I am going to be away until about the 22nd October. Time on-line will be reduced and my internet access may be limited. PMs may not be replied to as quickly as normal !


#8 OldPhil

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Posted 18 December 2017 - 08:27 PM

I have been mucking about with these aggravating boxes since 1972.  I have had quite a few machines and laptops from all the commonly known vendors.  The least troublesome have been Acer and Dell, I still have an Acer AOD 255 vintage 2010.  I am starting to really like Toshiba my 2012 lap top has been flawless, being retired it runs a bout 10 hours a day.  My tower is a custom time will tell as with all home builds!  If you build you get to chose recommended parts but only have the individual manufacturers warranty, I know from previous builds dealing with some parts makers can be a major pain.  I feel for the majority of folks they are way ahead of the game going with one of the popular names.


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#9 Kilroy

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Posted 19 December 2017 - 12:43 PM

I personally don't think support is that big of a deal.  There is also a difference between consumer and business hardware.  I support HP business machines and if 26% of them were having issues in three years they would switch.

 

You can't put Apple in with other PCs, a totally different animal.  Who cares how good an Apple machine is if it won't run the software you need?

 

Bottom line is you get what you pay for.  I recommend Dell or HP's business line, they both come with three years of support.



#10 charlzden

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Posted 21 December 2017 - 01:43 AM

I also prefer a custom built desktop. But when it comes to laptop, I like Asus and Dell.



#11 britechguy

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Posted 21 December 2017 - 11:05 AM

My own anecdotal evidence is that, "it doesn't matter."

 

In laptops I've owned Acer, Asus, Toshiba, and HP (three of these now with the latest two being the new upgrades to our equipment, the third being my several years old model that's still going strong), and in desktops I've had Gateway, eMachines, and HP.    All have worked just fine.

 

I have never found anyone who could or does rely on manufacturer support beyond the warranty period since they all seem to make it a grand PITA to deal with them after this period is over (and some even during that period) and I have seldom seen any computer fail while still under warranty.

 

I buy based on price and the features I want/need at the point in time that I'm buying.  I've also bought manufacturer refurbished and never had any issues with those, either.  They were indistinguishable from brand new.

 

Computers have, in my experience, always been a "you pays your money and you takes your chances" kind of deal and I, thankfully, have not had any disasters in the decades since the 1980s when I actually started owning the things (and the earliest ones were cast offs from others when I was still a poor student).


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#12 JohnC_21

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Posted 21 December 2017 - 12:26 PM

I have never custom built a computer. For what I need I purchase OEM. Luckily I got great deals because of Windows OS end of life. I got a great price on a Vista laptop with the free Windows 7 upgrade. When Windows 8 was released I got a great deal on a Windows 7 HP. I got a huge discount on a ASUS desktop with Windows 8.1 during the Windows 10 release. Personally I've been very lucky. Not one hard drive failure during all my years using computers. Knock on wood. Never had a problem in or out of warranty. 

 

If I had to purchase anything today it would be refurbished. 



#13 MadmanRB

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Posted 21 December 2017 - 12:32 PM

The problem with OEM is most overcharge you for crap.

Plus all the bloatware that comes preinstalled with OEM, no thanks.


Edited by MadmanRB, 21 December 2017 - 12:33 PM.

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#14 JohnC_21

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Posted 21 December 2017 - 01:21 PM

The problem with OEM is most overcharge you for crap.

Plus all the bloatware that comes preinstalled with OEM, no thanks.

That's the first thing I do, remove the bloatware. It's not that hard to do. There is no way I could have built a computer for the price I paid for the ASUS or HP which included the OS. The ASUS is not top of the line but it's not at the bottom of the heap either. AMD FX8310 3.4GHz with 8GB or RAM including a Wifi card. I got Best Buy to match Amazon which resulted in a huge discount.



#15 Guest_Joe C_*

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Posted 21 December 2017 - 01:55 PM

If you are an enthusiast, then OEM pc will not work for you, people that like to game, and video edit... ect. Use their pc for more than just surfing and shopping/email. They need more than the OEM's can provide. This is where custom built pc's come in. OEM's will not provide you with a power supply to upgrade your graphics card (if your OEM even has a graphics card) They will not and sometimes make it very difficult to upgrade your cpu, or add more memory (custom OEM bios) That is the difference you get from a cheaper OEM over a slightly more priced custom pc. Your less likely to be "out dated" with an up-gradable custom pc than an OEM pc, which strives to lock you into what they offer






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