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Linux Emulator


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#1 nyiddle

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Posted 25 September 2006 - 08:41 PM

(I searched for this and I couldn't find anything relating directly to this in 2 pages worth of topics. So I don't think there's a topic of this. If there is, I'm sorry and please delete this and link me to the topic containing this.)

I've seen some screenies, and I want to know if it's a private thing or a tweak or whatever, but is there such a thing as a Linux emulator? IE: It runs in a small window that you can minimize, whatever, and it makes a /root/ somewhere in your Program Files or wherever you designate it to install to. If so, please link and possibly explain, because I'm interested. My computer never have any luck when I have installations of both Linux and Windows XP on 'em. Mind you, I'm not talking about a GRUB system or anything, I mean a fully-functional graphical environment and everything.
Here's a screenie I googled.
http://www.parallels.com/files/upload/susesolaris_win.gif

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#2 rubiconeye

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Posted 25 September 2006 - 09:13 PM

hi, nyiddle,

is this what you are looking for:

http://www.colinux.org/

#3 DaveM59

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Posted 25 September 2006 - 09:40 PM

Since the VMWare Player is available free, you can do this by building a virtual linux machine at easyvmx.com. You can customize the VM for several popular distros. Of course you also have to download the distro and install it. An even easier option is a prebuilt VM called the "Browser Appliance." It's based on Ubuntu Linux, and actually can be used for more than just browsing, by adding other applications. That VM is available for download via a link on the same webpage as the VMWare player here.

#4 nyiddle

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Posted 26 September 2006 - 03:05 PM

Since the VMWare Player is available free, you can do this by building a virtual linux machine at easyvmx.com. You can customize the VM for several popular distros. Of course you also have to download the distro and install it. An even easier option is a prebuilt VM called the "Browser Appliance." It's based on Ubuntu Linux, and actually can be used for more than just browsing, by adding other applications. That VM is available for download via a link on the same webpage as the VMWare player here.

Alright this one looks a little bit more enticing.
I'll post more if I have any more problems. Thanks, though.

Edit:
Okay. Problems already.
When you say 'download the distro and install it.' can I just insert my SuSE 9 CD and run VMX Player and have it detect it? Because... That's not happening. I get the error that there's no bootdisk in. I'm gonna try installing with the DVD version of SuSE 9 now. If it works I'll erase dis.

Edited by nyiddle, 26 September 2006 - 04:12 PM.

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#5 groovicus

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Posted 26 September 2006 - 04:46 PM

You need to run VMWare, and choose the option to install a guest operating system.

#6 nyiddle

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Posted 26 September 2006 - 06:08 PM

Yeah nevermind. I decided it'd be a lot easier to set it up through a ISO rather than a disk, so I just took all of the files and burned them to a .iso and then installed it through there.
VM Player works great. I can run Linux without severely messing up my computer! Thanks everyone.

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#7 Joedude

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Posted 29 September 2006 - 08:25 AM

I've been running linux for about 7 years, and it has never messed up my computer...Windows on the other hand...
If someone tells you to su rm -rf /
DON'T DO IT!!!!
Be in the know, Bash smart!

#8 DaveM59

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Posted 29 September 2006 - 02:12 PM

Point taken, Joedude, but what _can_ mess up your computer (meaning, a functioning installation of Windows, which for a variety of reasons you do not want to abandon) is trying to repartiton the hard drive on the fly and set up a dual-boot arrangement. I have done this several times, but my luck finally ran out and I decided that one catastophe of that order was enough. The VM is basically a collection of files and a single Windows program and as such involves no low-level alterations to your hard drive.

BTW there's also a VMWare Player for Linux, if you ever feel like setting up a Windows VM on your machine...

#9 Joedude

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Posted 29 September 2006 - 03:05 PM

Agreed. There is always a risk when messing with a boot sector. In a perfect world, and in theory, the bootloader shouldn't mess any of it up. But, Murphy knows boolean as well.

I think my point was, it doesn't mean you will. The exception is losing a functioning OS, not gaining a dual boot system. In the odd event windows has decided to play up on me, (which I personally never use, but my wife does, and it's the only reason it's on my system), If the weak tools in windows couldn't fix it, I was always able to fix it from Linux.

I just don't personally understand what the facination is with VMware. I can see some practicle applications for it, but I personally wouldn't see it as ideal. It's just my opinion.

Linux and windows are designed to be used as operating systems and function best in thier own environments. I'm not a gentoo junkie who tries to sqeeze every ounce of performance out by waiting days to compile a program that takes 30 seconds to run or anything, The system works better in the environment it was designed for, not a simulated one. Now, every time you have an error, you'll have to start with the option of 1. Is it VM or 2. is it OS. Then you start trying to fix it.

I may look more into it later. It's just not practicle for me. We all have our own needs though, and promoting horror stories of crashed, damaged and irrepairable systems is not beneficial to the open source community.
If someone tells you to su rm -rf /
DON'T DO IT!!!!
Be in the know, Bash smart!

#10 no one

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Posted 29 September 2006 - 06:19 PM

Has anyone tried one of the large number of "Live" distros?
no muss, no fuss, never touch the HDD. ( I like DSL )
would seem easier than the VM route.

"Not everything that counts can be counted, and not everything that can be counted counts."

"Whoever fights monsters should see to it that in the process he does not become a monster"

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#11 DaveM59

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Posted 29 September 2006 - 06:54 PM

A mixed marriage, eh? I'm in one of those myself -- my wife has a Mac...

Agreed, the ideal is a dedicated machine or at least partition(s) for each operating system. Also agreed, horror stories aren't good for the open source movement, but on the other hand, 20 years of Windows horror stories haven't cut into Microsoft's market share.

I do believe that for Windows users a VM is a safer alternative than setting up dual boot, especially now that the command line has become a legend spoken of only on dark nights around the fire. For that reason alone, I think that VMWare is at least potentially a benefit for the Linux community.

Myself, I mainly use my Windows VMs as a sandbox for playing with malware. The Ubuntu "browser appliance" is just for fun.

(edit) no one: the live CDs are easiest of all -- in fact, installing Linux on a VM is no easier than installing it on a dedicated hard drive. But the performance hit is considerable, and you have to have a FAT32 partition on your hard drive if you want to save anything.

Edited by DaveM59, 29 September 2006 - 06:59 PM.


#12 Joedude

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Posted 30 September 2006 - 04:37 AM

Also, don't be discouraged by the slowness of a live CD. It is just an example of what goes on in the OS and lets you play with it to see if you like it. Your cd/dvd rom is not anywhere near the capabilites of a HDD. It's slow for that reason. Typically, the speed of the OS when installed is miles faster than using the cd drives.
If someone tells you to su rm -rf /
DON'T DO IT!!!!
Be in the know, Bash smart!

#13 no one

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Posted 30 September 2006 - 10:54 AM

I've used live Linux (Knoppix 3.7 at first, now DSL 3.1) for about a year and a half now :thumbsup: . as far as speed goes, it's hard to miss what you never had. Running DSL on my new box(Linspire) even without using "toram" seems fairly fast to me (using DSL as i "speak") but, after comming from a 350k6 win98 128mb pc66memory setup, what wouldn't seem fast? :flowers:

"Not everything that counts can be counted, and not everything that can be counted counts."

"Whoever fights monsters should see to it that in the process he does not become a monster"

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