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How well do retro PDA devices compare to eachother for modern usage?


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#1 Punchy71

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 11:31 AM

Hi,

    I'm thinking of buying a used, retro, old school pocket PDA device (or something similar such as a palmtop device for example) for general, everyday use. How do the different types of pocket PDA and palmtop devices differ from one another and how usable are they, one from another? I'm looking at the following types:

 

Sony Clie

Palm OS/Tungsten

Pocket PC

Blackberry

(possibly an old, used smart phone with Replicant Operating System installed)

Palmtop style devices like - Hewlett Packard, Jornada, Sony VAIO "P" palmtop-like device, Lenovo palmtop-like device, PSION Series 5mx, etc.

 

Are there any others I should consider in my search?

 

Thank you

 

 



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#2 britechguy

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 12:40 PM

Before I start, I want to say that I absolutely loved the Palm and Handspring devices I used "way back when."

 

But I have to ask, why would you want to do this?  You need to be clear about what you need/want to sync with your PC and whether the version of Outlook (most likely) would support it if you're using Outlook or if Palm Desktop will install on the machine you have in mind.

 

If you're thinking about using a Palm-era device with something like Google Calendar it's going to be far more trouble than it's worth.  You also cannot get apps practically anywhere for these things these days, and that includes from archives, which have largely disappeared.

 

For the sort of thing that most Palm-era devices are used for, calendar, tasks/to-do lists, etc., it is possible to buy a low-end prepaid smart phone, and not activate it if you don't want phone service, and use it for that purpose while having much greater ease dealing with "the current world."


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website address in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose
              

 


#3 Punchy71

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 01:22 PM

Before I start, I want to say that I absolutely loved the Palm and Handspring devices I used "way back when."

 

But I have to ask, why would you want to do this?  You need to be clear about what you need/want to sync with your PC and whether the version of Outlook (most likely) would support it if you're using Outlook or if Palm Desktop will install on the machine you have in mind.

 

If you're thinking about using a Palm-era device with something like Google Calendar it's going to be far more trouble than it's worth.  You also cannot get apps practically anywhere for these things these days, and that includes from archives, which have largely disappeared.

 

For the sort of thing that most Palm-era devices are used for, calendar, tasks/to-do lists, etc., it is possible to buy a low-end prepaid smart phone, and not activate it if you don't want phone service, and use it for that purpose while having much greater ease dealing with "the current world."

Yes, I was considering just buying a standard, ordinary, modern smart phone and using it like a Palm device without hooking myself up to cellular phone service, but I wasn't for sure you could do this or not. But now you pretty much confirmed that it can indeed be done this way.

I just want to use a pocket device for general everyday tasks and not really talk on it. That's why I was considering an old, retro Palm or some other similar device.

If I did it this way, could I still upload new apps onto it some way from my main desktop PC? ... say using an SD card or some other way?


Edited by Punchy71, 06 December 2017 - 01:30 PM.


#4 britechguy

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 04:55 PM

Do yourself a favor and find a low-end Android smartphone.

 

It is well-nigh impossible to get any apps for the Palm platform (regardless of who made it - Palm OS was on several different brands).  If you want the modern equivalent of Palm OS it's Android.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website address in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

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#5 Punchy71

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Posted 07 December 2017 - 11:55 AM

Okay, I'll give this a try. Thank you for the tip!



#6 britechguy

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Posted 07 December 2017 - 09:41 PM

You're quite welcome.

 

It's tragic that Palm dropped the ball like they did when they did.  I really, really liked Palm OS and had Palm played its cards right it might still be near the top of the heap in smartphones (which are the modern replacement for the straight PDA).


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website address in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose
              

 





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