Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

DNS fields are empty. What means?


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 cafejose

cafejose

  • Members
  • 1,059 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:03:49 PM

Posted 04 December 2017 - 06:30 AM

Windows Vista, s.p.2, wifi internet connection, 32-bit machine, laptop

Browsers most used are Opera 36, IE, Firefox ESR 52.?.?

 

 

Control Panel; Network and Sharing Center; (wireless network connection) View Status; Properties button; click to highlight Internet Protocol Version 4; Properties button; 
 
The General Tab shows radio button in the item: Obtain DNS Server Address Automatically.
The two fields under that are both empty.
 
Is this normal?  No trouble in general using the internet.  Searches work.  Going to any specific addresses work.  If no addresses are shown in those two fields mentioned, how does computer or browser know what or how to check for any web address on internet?  


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 iMacg3

iMacg3

    Bleepin' PowerPC G3


  • Malware Study Hall Senior
  • 1,407 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Indiana, USA
  • Local time:06:49 PM

Posted 04 December 2017 - 11:41 AM

This is normal. It means the computer will obtain a DNS server automatically, and not a particular DNS server you specify.

My computer has the same setting:

lk3cI3l.jpg

Regards, iMacg3

If I do not reply to your malware removal topic in 48 hours, please send me a PM.

"Do, or do not. There is no try." - Yoda


#3 Kilroy

Kilroy

  • BC Advisor
  • 3,442 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Launderdale, MN
  • Local time:05:49 PM

Posted 04 December 2017 - 04:10 PM

Those boxes are used if the Use the following DNS server addresses is selected.  You can use these to specify the DNS servers you use, otherwise you will use the DNS servers provided by your DHCP server.



#4 cafejose

cafejose
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 1,059 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:03:49 PM

Posted 05 December 2017 - 02:29 AM

How do I look for the same information in a Windows 10 computer?  I have already tried an internet search but the screens avalable do NOT match what I find, so I never can find the DNS information about the two Windows 10 machines available here.  One machine is ethernet connected to internet and the other is wifi connected.



#5 iMacg3

iMacg3

    Bleepin' PowerPC G3


  • Malware Study Hall Senior
  • 1,407 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Indiana, USA
  • Local time:06:49 PM

Posted 05 December 2017 - 09:33 AM

To find the DNS servers that your computer is using on Windows 10, first click on the Start button, the type in Control Panel and press Enter. Click on Network and Internet, then Network and Sharing Center. On the left, click on Change Adapter Settings.
Identify your network adapter that is currently connected to the Internet (in your case, it will be an Ethernet adapter for one computer or a WiFi adapter for the other computer). Once you have, right-click on it and select Properties. Then select Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4) and then click on Properties. Your DNS settings will appear.

Regards, iMacg3

If I do not reply to your malware removal topic in 48 hours, please send me a PM.

"Do, or do not. There is no try." - Yoda


#6 Kilroy

Kilroy

  • BC Advisor
  • 3,442 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Launderdale, MN
  • Local time:05:49 PM

Posted 06 December 2017 - 03:19 PM

Or you can run the Command prompt by searching for CMD and then type IPCONFIG /ALL and press enter.  Scroll through the text to see your DNS servers and a lot of other network information.



#7 cafejose

cafejose
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 1,059 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:03:49 PM

Posted 06 December 2017 - 07:32 PM

Or you can run the Command prompt by searching for CMD and then type IPCONFIG /ALL and press enter.  Scroll through the text to see your DNS servers and a lot of other network information.

I am trying this on my Vista machine  (even though my question was specifically for on Windows 10).  Much interesting stuff there which I mostly do not understand.  I notice some  attlocal.net, DNS Servers with some web address all in numbers, and several section of "terminal local area connection" with a numeric designation on each.

 

I guess a good online search to do would be IPCONFIG /ALL and I may hopefully find more about what the many things mean.  Not tried this yet.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users