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Glary Utilities - What is an "Optimised" Defrag?


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#1 F1Help

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Posted 30 November 2017 - 07:16 AM

Hi,

I've read the article here:

http://feedback.glarysoft.com/knowledgebase/articles/427342-disk-defrag

With Disk Defrag, there are two options:

  • Defrag
  • Defrag and Optimise (slower, use once a week)

Just wondered what are the differences between the two?  How does an "Optimise" defrag actually differ from just a regular defrag?

Thanks.



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#2 Platypus

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Posted 30 November 2017 - 08:00 AM

Defragmentation alone just recombines any files that are broken up into more than one fragment. Having the files themselves contiguous gives the quickest enhancement to performance, removing the need for multiple head seeks to read from multiple fragments. This takes no notice of where the files are located on the drive, simply that they're each in one piece.

Optimization re-positions any of the files that would benefit from being in a different location, judged by a few criteria, such as boot optimization (placing the boot files in order required at the start of the drive) or compaction (clustering files as close as possible to the FAT or MFT).

This is time consuming, and re-positioning of files is required less frequently than simple file defragmentation.

I believe drive optimization would be needed much less than weekly, especially as Windows since XP has done background defragmentation, including boot optimization after every third restart cycle.

Edited by Platypus, 30 November 2017 - 08:49 AM.

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#3 F1Help

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Posted 30 November 2017 - 09:05 AM

Thanks for your helpful explanation.

Is it best to use the defrag tool that comes with Windows 7 Pro, or use Glary Utilities Disk Defrag?



#4 Platypus

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Posted 30 November 2017 - 04:35 PM

Personally, I've always found the Windows Defragmenter perfectly adequate. But some folk like specific features of other defrag apps.

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#5 F1Help

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Posted 01 December 2017 - 11:30 AM

Personally, I've always found the Windows Defragmenter perfectly adequate. But some folk like specific features of other defrag apps.

 

Yes, same here with my experience of disk defragmentation.



#6 monkeylove

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 09:23 AM

I'm maintaining several machines, and they have different OSes (Win 7 and 8.1) and are used in different ways (from surfing and editing documents to gaming to modifying and moving lots of files and videos plus installing and testing programs). I noticed that for those that don't involve a lot of activity the built-in defragmenter is fine. For others, however, third-party defragmenters together with cleaners and tune-up programs were needed to speed up the machines.



#7 Platypus

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 10:05 AM

third-party defragmenters together with cleaners and tune-up programs were needed to speed up the machines.


Third party defragmenters don't defragment to any great degree "better" than the Windows defragmenter. They use the Windows defragmentation API and the same file optimization layout used by the Windows defragmenter which is drawn from the superfetch system utilization data. If they did otherwise, their alternative optimization would be continually being reverted by Windows own background idle time defragmentation.

So called cleaners and tune-up programs make many claims which vary from reasonable to snake oil, and registry cleaners/optimizers are not recommended by Bleeping Computer, nor by the majority of experienced computer technicians. Some well regarded non-registry cleaners are useful for automating cleanup tasks that to do manually would involve navigating several different areas of Windows and could be tedious, or challenging for inexperienced users. Other "optimization" utilities have been shown to make ridiculous and exaggerated claims as to their efficacy, even to the point of having been shown to claim they find hundreds of "faults" they can fix up in a clean new Windows installation.

Edited by Platypus, 13 December 2017 - 10:07 AM.

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#8 monkeylove

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Posted 01 February 2018 - 11:01 PM

Indeed, and I saw that in at least one test, but users tell me that the machines ran faster in varying degrees, i.e., various apps (from the file explorer to office programs) were more responsive and the boot time was faster. Before that, all of them were running using the default maintenance features set by MS, and at some time (varying from a few weeks later to a few months) the systems became less responsive. What I did observe is that for most of them, new hardware (and thus drivers) and programs were installed and uninstalled, for one that was particularly slow, large numbers of files (from videos to pics) were being modified or moved or copied around.


Edited by hamluis, 05 February 2018 - 04:04 PM.


#9 TairikuOkami

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Posted 09 February 2018 - 07:01 AM

Windows Defrag performs optimization as well. For maximum effectiveness, it is better to defrag outside of Windows.

Defrag HDD - Boot Windows USB - Repair - Troubleshoot - CMD - type/enter

c:
cd windows
cd system32
defrag c: /u

Sometimes, c: might not be as your Windows parition during boot, you can use analyze to check.

defrag c: /a

Edited by TairikuOkami, 09 February 2018 - 07:55 AM.


#10 monkeylove

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Posted 23 February 2018 - 12:41 AM

I found out that for some Win 7 and 8.1 machines the scheduled defrag does not take place, and probably because no idle time was detected. To deal with that, I disabled the defrag scheduler and created a new one in the task scheduler.






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