Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

could someone maybe help?


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 darkmj16

darkmj16

  • Members
  • 2 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Virginia
  • Local time:12:37 AM

Posted 24 November 2017 - 07:58 AM

hey everyone.

 

im a bit of a novice DIY with my computers and i just got done removing malware/and a virus. also took the time to learn how to remove all that wonderful bloatware dell/intel likes to put on my laptop. so now i have decided to create a bare bones recovery disc thats just that, a bare bones win7 ultimate OS that i can use to install on any of my machines. and i think im too the point of being done but could i get some one to maybe check me? make sure i dont have any useless programs or errors?

 

i tried looking in the reg to make sure its all good... i failed. no idea how to fix or anything in there and i know i can royally screw my machine up doing that. not sure where to post for that help yet.

 

also is it possible to add the programs i always use to the recovery disc so i dont have to keep re-downing them?



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 55,252 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:12:37 AM

Posted 24 November 2017 - 08:56 AM

On OEM systems...recovery disk data is usually spelled out by the system manufacturer, at the respecive website. 

 

System manufacturer and model?

 

It sounds to me as if what you really want/need is a backup which is made when the system is fully functional, without problems.

 

Louis


Edited by hamluis, 24 November 2017 - 08:58 AM.


#3 darkmj16

darkmj16
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 2 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Virginia
  • Local time:12:37 AM

Posted 24 November 2017 - 09:29 AM

i see what you mean. i might of misunderstood what bare bones means.

 

currently im on a dell inspiron n5110 laptop with the intel i5 and intel graphics. how ever another laptop i use is an aleinware 15 with intel i7 and i believe a gtx vid card. but my desktop is custome build with an amd fx6300 and nvidia gtx 980 i believe is the card.  

 

i guess once i fix the reg im looking to make a back up that has basic drivers and the OS. for manufacturer specific drivers i can download on a usb or use the cd. thats not an issue and was expected.



#4 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 55,252 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:12:37 AM

Posted 24 November 2017 - 11:13 AM

Well...I believe routine system backups...will meet your desires better than any other approach.  Better than a clean reinstall...because all files are more current and reinstalling a backup takes less time and carries less stress than any other attempt to get back to a good working system.

 

I'm going to move this topic to the BC Backup/Imaging forum where the more knowledgeable can suggest far better ideas than my own.

 

Louis



#5 Cid6-7

Cid6-7

  • Members
  • 3 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:09:37 PM

Posted 25 November 2017 - 02:43 AM

Google a app called XBOOT I think its what your after 

As for a "bloatless" windows 7 install, you'd need a installation cd or usb img which you can also find on google for free.  :thumbsup:


Edited by Cid6-7, 25 November 2017 - 02:44 AM.


#6 ranchhand_

ranchhand_

  • Members
  • 1,567 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Midwest
  • Local time:11:37 PM

Posted 25 November 2017 - 05:11 PM

As previously mentioned, get your machine to where you want it, then use Macrium Reflect (free) to create an image to an external backup drive. Do this on the 1st and 15th of every month, and this is called a backup routine.

Creating one image only and keeping it for a few years will result in a catastrophe when restoring in an emergency. You will lose newly installed programs and any updates to them, lose all updates to your operating system (especially Windows 10!), you will lose updated drivers for components, you will lose your current data and configurations, especially if you upgraded any components. Any new pictures of family, friends, etc. are now gone, and so on.

 

i tried looking in the reg to make sure its all good

You are 100% correct; if you don't know what you are doing in the Register you can royally screw your operating system, or at the least cause yourself complications with various programs. There is no reason to be afraid of the Register, it can be learned just like any other aspect of Windows. OH...and since you are new (there is no shame in that, at one time everyone on this forum was new!) do not and never use any of these "automatic register cleaners and optimizers" that you will see advertised for free. These are only sales gimmicks and many will download viruses or adware you will be sorry to have on your computer. These scumware usually show up when you web-search on your browser for a particular system file to find out what it does.


Edited by ranchhand_, 25 November 2017 - 05:21 PM.

Help Requests: If there is no reply after 3 days I remove the thread from my answer list. For further help PM me.


#7 RolandJS

RolandJS

  • Members
  • 4,479 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Austin TX metro area
  • Local time:12:37 AM

Posted 25 November 2017 - 09:09 PM

"...bare bones recovery disc thats just that, a bare bones win7 ultimate OS that i can use to install on any of my machines..."  Some of the Linux folks in here will indicate you can do exactly that with Linux OS -- however, if you intend on staying with Windows, follow Ranchhand's advice and the advice of others  :)


"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)

"I heard Spock finally got colander!"  "I believe the word is Kolinahr."  "Oh."


#8 joseibarra

joseibarra

  • Members
  • 1,085 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Downstairs
  • Local time:01:37 AM

Posted 26 November 2017 - 03:17 AM

If you ave two different systems (a Dell something or another and an Alienware which is also a Dell) you should get each setup the way you like/want and you can create an image of each using the free version of Macrium Reflect:

 

Free Macrium Reflect

 

It is extremely unlikely that you will be able to have one image that will work on two different systems with different hardware.  Each machine will need to have a separate image.

The image you make for your Dell is not the one you want to restore to your Alienware and vice versa.

 

If you want to get rid of all the bloatware and other stuff I would perform a clean/fresh install of Windows 7, get it updated, install and configure all your third party applications you want/need and when it is just right create the image.  

 

OEM systems where Windows comes preinstalled from the factory generally do not come with Windows installation media so you will need to create some.

 

I would not attempt and it may not be possible to store your good image on a CD/DVD or several CD/DVDs - that is a risky strategy.  If you ever do need the image that might work and it might not work.  It makes more sense to store your images in separate folders (one for each system) on an separate external hard drive - not the same drive and the installation itself.

 

Over time you may add/change things and then you can periodically create new images and keep maintain as many images as you want going back in time as far as you want.

 

If your system crashes or becomes unusable someday and you need to recover it to one of the saved images how are you going to do that?

 

You should create some recovery media (a bootable CD/DVD or USB thumb drive), pretend your system has become unusable and you need to restore one of your images.

 

Are you able to boot on the recovery media and access the system images you previously made and saved?  You don't have to "do" anything...  just be sure your recovery media boots and it can access/find the system images you need.

 

And each system will probably need it's own bootable recovery media.  What works on your Dell probably will not work on your Alienware.

 

The day you need to recovery strategy to work is not the day to find out your recovery strategy doesn't work.

 

 


The mediocre teacher tells. The good teacher explains. The superior teacher demonstrates.


#9 britechguy

britechguy

    Been there, done that, got the T-shirt


  • Moderator
  • 6,845 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Staunton, VA
  • Local time:01:37 AM

Posted 26 November 2017 - 09:58 AM

I am going to say several things that are slightly contradictory, yet also highly congruent, to what's already been said.

 

It's great if you get in the habit of doing a date driven full system image backup, and there's nothing wrong with that, but it really can be overkill. Ranchhand_ has already deftly identified what I refer to as trigger events for doing a full system image backup.  Any time you've expended significant effort in installing software or customizing the configuration of your machine to suit you, you should immediately do a full system image backup.  Each and every time a Windows 10 full feature update (or its equivalent on other versions of Windows or other OSes) occurs you should do a full system image update.  You can train yourself to recognize when changes to your system have occurred that would "make me want to rend my clothing and tear my hair out" were one to have to do the work involved with them again.  That's my personal metric for when a full system image backup is needed, and there have been occasions when I'm very actively making major changes to a machine that this has been several times in one week.  System image backups are specific to a single machine, so you must take them for each machine.

 

If you are using Windows 10, you should definitely have File History set to ON to protect your user data files.  I prefer a constant user data backup regimen such as using File History or the Smart Backup feature of EaseUS Todo Backup over system images for the purpose of backing up, well, user data.  No matter how long ago your system image may have been taken, at least all of the files you have created, uploaded, downloaded, etc., will be backed up - and using either of these techniques without your even thinking about it or doing anything other than turning the function on - far more frequently than system images taken once every two weeks.  They also make selective recovery of deleted (or otherwise damaged or screwed-up) files very, very easy.

 

As much as I like Macrium Reflect Free, and I do, I find that it's interface is far from user friendly for the "less geeky" among us.  That's why I recommend that folks take a look at EaseUS Todo Backup Free and AOMEI Backupper, with the former being my favorite because of the simplicity of the user interface.


Edited by britechguy, 26 November 2017 - 09:59 AM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
             ~ Lauren Bacall
              

 





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users