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Intel is dropping support for legacy BIOS


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#1 JohnC_21

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Posted 23 November 2017 - 11:52 AM

INTEL IS set to drop support for legacy BIOS systems by 2020, in a move that will likely render an awful lot of old software unable to run natively on new Intel-based machines after this date. 
 
The BIOS on older machines helps initialise hardware during its boot-up phase and provides a bootloader for the operating system. In more recent years, the BIOS has been replaced by the UEFI (currently Class 2) system, which stands for Unified Extensible Firmware Interface, but support for older software has been maintained through use of a compatibility support module (CSM). 
 
The UEFI Class 3 system will remove support for this software module, thereby ending support for any non-64-bit operating systems or software. As noted by Anandtech, it'll also mean that any non-compliant older hardware, such as graphics cards, network cards and some storage adaptors, would also stop working. 

 

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#2 MadmanRB

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Posted 23 November 2017 - 12:10 PM

This does not bode well for linux, intel still better offer a non UEFI mode as linux users will definitely stop buying intel after this.

CSM is there for people who dont want windows 10, i guess intel wants only Microsoft and apple now.


Edited by MadmanRB, 23 November 2017 - 12:11 PM.

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#3 britechguy

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Posted 23 November 2017 - 01:32 PM

My only reply is, "And this is surprising in exactly what way?"

 

No manufacturer, particularly in computers, is going to support antiquated technologies in perpetuity.

 

Those who think they'll run elsewhere don't have a lot of other places to run, and I'll bet that AMD follows suit.  For those of us who've been working in IT almost since the term "IT" was first coined, it's a, "'Twas ever thus," situation.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

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#4 MadmanRB

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Posted 23 November 2017 - 01:34 PM

Again i wonder if linux users will try to make a workaround of some kind.

I mean secure boot as long as it remains optional is good but you can bet linux users will be unhappy over this.


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#5 britechguy

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Posted 23 November 2017 - 01:39 PM

Again i wonder if linux users will try to make a workaround of some kind.

I mean secure boot as long as it remains optional is good but you can bet linux users will be unhappy over this.

 

The following is not meant to be personally snarky in any way, but regarding your last observation I am quite certain that the manufacturers' responses will be a collective, "So what?"

 

Things such as this have happened again and again and again.  Time and technology both march on.  You would not believe how often, on a different forum that is not quite as "nuts and bolts technology"-related, I see people railing against the fact that assistive technology software makers are now dropping support for Windows XP.  It is ridiculous to think that anyone would continue supporting Windows XP once the time arrived that doing so wasn't, for all practical intents and purposes, a passive (or minimally active) undertaking.

 

If ever there were an industry where the old saw, "Lead, follow, or get out of the way!," applies it's computing technology.  You either go with the flow or get drowned in the rapids.


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#6 MadmanRB

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Posted 23 November 2017 - 01:51 PM

The thing is that linux has a ever growing user base, 2.8 market share is nothing to sneeze at.

its still higher than windows 8 and just behind macOS.

Windows 10 is actually bleeding marketshare as windows 7 has become revived in its popularity.

Its because of the privacy concerns of windows 10 and i suspect its only going to get worse once windows 7 loses support


Edited by MadmanRB, 23 November 2017 - 01:53 PM.

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#7 hamluis

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Posted 23 November 2017 - 01:59 PM

IMO, it's that old human tendency to try to deny the fact that...change is a constant (perhaps the only constant) in any environment.  The concept "now" ihas no referrent the moment that it is conceived, especially so in a technologically-oriented society in which we all find ourselves.  Today's workers are busy working on tomorrow's products.

 

If a given segment of the world populace chooses to resent that...it only reflects a basic attempt to deny the obvious.

 

Technology is no different than our bodies/minds...the old gives way to the new constantly...which, in turn, will give way to the newer ad infinitum.

 

Yes put forth a song titled "Perpetual Change".

 

Just because we use the concept "now" as if there is some permanency/stability which can be attached to using such concepts...it's just a semantic concept we invented.

 

Change rules what we call "the universe",

 

Like it or not.  No business has a vested interest in stagnancy or (worse) reversion to the past.  Microsoft, Intel, AMD...those are businesses.

 

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#8 britechguy

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Posted 23 November 2017 - 02:39 PM

The thing is that linux has a ever growing user base, 2.8 market share is nothing to sneeze at.

its still higher than windows 8 and just behind macOS.

Windows 10 is actually bleeding marketshare as windows 7 has become revived in its popularity.

Its because of the privacy concerns of windows 10 and i suspect its only going to get worse once windows 7 loses support

 

And how much of that 2.8 percent is running on hardware that is, by computing standards, antique?  That is a very important question to which I do not have the answer.  I would suspect, however, that it's well less than half of that.  The computing power needed to do a lot of the things that people now generally want to do doesn't exist on 20 to 30 year old hardware.

 

I don't care how "revived in its popularity" Windows 7 is, or may become, when Microsoft drops support for it the fat lady has sung.  Businesses, in particular, are not going to jettison decades of investment in Windows based PCs, software, and institutional memory to jump to something else.  Just ain't gonna happen.

 

Others will (and have, obviously) disagree but my own research leads to my firm conviction that most of the "concerns" regarding privacy and Windows 10 are grossly overblown.  Even ignoring third-party tools, just using the "No"/"Off" option on all privacy settings and setting telemetry to "basic" takes you to a level of data exchange with Microsoft that is entirely consistent with what I could track in Windows 7.   

 

People also seem to be conveniently ignoring that telemetry, which seems to be the big bugaboo of those who want to make it one, has been put in Windows 7 and Windows 8/8.1 retroactively.   Oddly enough, there's been no furor that I can find regarding that.

 

It also makes no business sense for Microsoft, or any other major software maker, to engage in business practices that would open them up to litigation, and their own legal departments check over what these feature introductions mean in terms of legal exposure.  Microsoft is not going to do anything that would knock it out of major market segments, and particularly health care settings, in the United States or elsewhere.   If Windows 10 can be used in HIPAA-compliant settings, and it can, the claims of "spying" just don't hold up, at least for me.  I've had my machines as "locked down" as one can get them using the built-in settings and the amount of data that is going to Microsoft is, in my opinion, minimal.  It certainly does not suggest that they're "mining my machine for personal information."


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#9 MadmanRB

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Posted 23 November 2017 - 02:44 PM

Actually a good chunk of the user base is on older hardware thanks to linux's reputation for being good on older hardware and making old machines live again

As for newer hardware, its not like there are no linux users on new hardware.

My baby here is not a year old and is running linux as its main OS.


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#10 JohnC_21

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Posted 24 November 2017 - 09:15 AM

Linux has no problem with new hardware, i.e. UEFI. The problem would be SecureBoot but SecureBoot can still be disabled on UEFI motherboards, at least the aftermarket mohterboards, and I don't see that changing. OEM motherboards are another matter. They may make SecureBoot without the ability to be disabled but I think anybody that did that would cause the EU to raise red flags. 



#11 Joe C

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Posted 24 November 2017 - 07:54 PM

The folks that have seven and do not want 10 will keep there existing hardware. Today 47% of all windows pc's out there are running on Windows 7



#12 JohnC_21

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Posted 24 November 2017 - 08:36 PM

Close to four years since XP reached end of life,16 years since it's introduction, and it still has more market share than 8.1. Based on XP Windows 7 will still be in use going into 2025, the end of life for Windows 10.

 

It's hard to imagine but Windows 10 is over two years old.


Edited by JohnC_21, 24 November 2017 - 08:38 PM.


#13 softeyes

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Posted 24 November 2017 - 09:02 PM

Topic of Win XP  and HIPAA:  not longer than two months ago I went to a Kaiser Permanente dermatology appointment. After the RN left the room, the wall mounted monitor went into screen saver. What was revealed: Windows XP!!  I was absolutely shocked. Seriously...Kaiser! 



#14 Condobloke

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Posted 24 November 2017 - 09:09 PM

They obviously subscribe to the old adage...When you are on a good thing....stick to it !!


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fed up with Windows antics...??....LINUX IS THE ANSWER....I USE LINUX MINT 18.3  EXCLUSIVELY.

 

Microsoft gives you Windows, Linux gives you the whole house...

 

 

 

 

 


#15 JohnC_21

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Posted 24 November 2017 - 09:43 PM

Topic of Win XP  and HIPAA:  not longer than two months ago I went to a Kaiser Permanente dermatology appointment. After the RN left the room, the wall mounted monitor went into screen saver. What was revealed: Windows XP!!  I was absolutely shocked. Seriously...Kaiser! 

I don't believe XP is HIPAA compliant since XP end of live.

 

https://www.hitechanswers.net/hipaa-meaningful-use-compliance-windows-xp/

 

Just having a Windows XP computer on your network will be an automatic HIPAA violation— which makes you non-compliant with Meaningful Use— and will be a time bomb that could easily cause a reportable and expensive breach of protected patient information. HIPAA fines and loss of Meaningful Use money can far outweigh the expense of replacing your old computers.

 






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