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How to Bring Internet Into My Workshop, 60 Feet Away?


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#1 Gruber_Hans

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Posted 21 November 2017 - 10:46 PM

I have Spectrum internet, my own Docsis 3.0 Wireless Aries 6580-2 Surfboard Cable Modem, A Linksys WRT54GL Wireless Router and new, unused in a box I have a Linksys Wireless Bridge (and I have no idea what this is or how it's used).  And a bunch of Cat 5 ethernet cable.

 

What I'd like to do is use the hardware that I have to get internet into my Workshop (60 feet away, clear line of sight, no trees) wirelessly.

 

Can this be done?  If so, how?

 

I don't want to run cable, because if I do I'll have to bury it and that's more hassle than I want.  Any help appreciated and thanks in advance.



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#2 Kilroy

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Posted 22 November 2017 - 02:23 PM

A Wi-Fi Range Extender might be all you need.  The Linksys Wireless Bridge may serve the purpose, but without a part or model number it is hard to say.  Any other solution using the parts you have would require you to run cable to the workshop.

 

Essentially the Wireless Bridge or Range Extender will connect in the workshop via wireless and retransmit the wireless signal in the workshop.



#3 Gruber_Hans

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Posted 24 November 2017 - 08:54 PM

A Wi-Fi Range Extender might be all you need.  The Linksys Wireless Bridge may serve the purpose, but without a part or model number it is hard to say.  Any other solution using the parts you have would require you to run cable to the workshop.

 

Essentially the Wireless Bridge or Range Extender will connect in the workshop via wireless and retransmit the wireless signal in the workshop.

 

https://www.lifewire.com/range-of-typical-wifi-network-816564

 

So what I'd like to do is run a cable with a standard wifi antenna at the end of it and anchor that antenna to the roof of my house, then run a similar cable and antenna and mount it to the roof of my shop.  The article in the link above says a typical distance for wifi outdoors (assuming with clear line-of-sight) is about 300 feet.  Point to point, roof to roof distance from my house is only 60 feet, so signal strength should be no problem.

 

What I want to know is, "Will this work?", and if not, why not.



#4 Gruber_Hans

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Posted 25 November 2017 - 05:24 PM

Bump.



#5 toofarnorth

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Posted 25 November 2017 - 07:10 PM

Hello

If you want a connection as stable as possible these are your options:

1. Run a cable. It will always be superior to anything else. Buy cable that is meant for burying in the soil. It will cost you around 2$ pr meter (3feet) and it will last very long.

2. Run a dedicated radio link between the buildings. It will be far superior compared to using home quality Wifi equipment

Eg: a set of these will cost you 120$ and will work very well.
https://mikrotik.com/product/RBSXT5nDr2

We have set up quite a few of these links and 99,9% of the issues we have is either user error (as in pulling out wrong cables) or power outtages.

Also, for a few more dollars (199$) you could get this:
https://mikrotik.com/product/wireless_wire

1gbit full duplex connection on up to 100m distances.
We haven't tested it yet as the 60GHz band here in Norway is regulated strongly and the equipment need to pass certification first before they can sell it.


The reason I don't recommend using an external antenna for your existing Wifi is:
1. They are expensive. Perhaps so expensive that a link will cost you the same amount of money
2. Some Wifi standards use more than one radio at the same time. Putting one antenna on the outside of the house will make performance suffer. Perhaps even to the point where neither your house nor workshop has good enough service.

If your house and the workshop is on the same electrical fuse you might get ok results by using powerline adaptors.
I'd still recommend cable or dedicated link over it :)

Hth

tfn



#6 Gruber_Hans

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Posted 26 November 2017 - 12:35 AM

Look it's 60 feet.  The link I posted said you can get over 300 feet outside with line-of-site.  I see no reason to drop $xxx.xx for special hardware to get wireless to travel 20% of it's maximum distance. I don't think throwing money at the problem solves the problem.

 

I've spent some time reading up on making DIY directional antennas, and you can buy one for $20.00.  I don't think I need that.  I think I need to run a cable from the wireless router to an antenna and zip tie it to something on my roof.  Not sure what the wireless bridge does or how it works, but I have a feeling I can set that up at the shop, connect a basic $5.00 antenna mounted on the roof of the shop and make the thing work.  I don't think I need to spend a lot of money to get a wireless connection over 60 feet.  That's only 20% of the maximum range of the wireless.

 

I don't think I need to spend over a hundred dollars to get a wireless connection over 60 feet, which is 20% of the maximum range of the wireless router.

 

The wireless router's maximum range is over 300 feet.  I want to establish a wireless connection over just 60 feet, which is about 20% of the wireless router's maximum.

 

The wireless connection I'm trying to establish is only about 60 feet apart, and the maximum range of my wireless router is over 300 feet.  I don't think I need to spend over a hundred dollars on hardware in order to get this connection set up.

 

How many times should I repeat this before it starts to make sense to the people that are "helping" me?



#7 opera

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Posted 26 November 2017 - 02:09 AM

Sorry if this is a really obvious question but have you tried getting a connection to your wireless router from your workshop?

 

Are you going to be using a laptop in there? If yes..test connecting it.

 

The results may determine what course of action you take next.



#8 toofarnorth

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Posted 26 November 2017 - 08:22 AM

Look it's 60 feet.  The link I posted said you can get over 300 feet outside with line-of-site.  I see no reason to drop $xxx.xx for special hardware to get wireless to travel 20% of it's maximum distance. I don't think throwing money at the problem solves the problem.

 

I've spent some time reading up on making DIY directional antennas, and you can buy one for $20.00.  I don't think I need that.  I think I need to run a cable from the wireless router to an antenna and zip tie it to something on my roof.  Not sure what the wireless bridge does or how it works, but I have a feeling I can set that up at the shop, connect a basic $5.00 antenna mounted on the roof of the shop and make the thing work.  I don't think I need to spend a lot of money to get a wireless connection over 60 feet.  That's only 20% of the maximum range of the wireless.

 

I don't think I need to spend over a hundred dollars to get a wireless connection over 60 feet, which is 20% of the maximum range of the wireless router.

 

The wireless router's maximum range is over 300 feet.  I want to establish a wireless connection over just 60 feet, which is about 20% of the wireless router's maximum.

 

The wireless connection I'm trying to establish is only about 60 feet apart, and the maximum range of my wireless router is over 300 feet.  I don't think I need to spend over a hundred dollars on hardware in order to get this connection set up.

 

How many times should I repeat this before it starts to make sense to the people that are "helping" me?

My apologies if I offended you in any way.

I have recommended solutions that are tested and true.
These would be the suggestions I would give my own customers to insure problemfree operation.

I would suggest you try your own ideas and see if they will work.
Then come back and let the forum and Google know what you did and how you solved it so that others might benefit from it as well :)

tfn

.

 



#9 Gruber_Hans

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Posted 26 November 2017 - 12:39 PM

Sorry if this is a really obvious question but have you tried getting a connection to your wireless router from your workshop?

 

Are you going to be using a laptop in there? If yes..test connecting it.

 

The results may determine what course of action you take next.

 

Thanks and yes I have tried it but I cannot get any signal strength from inside the house to inside the shop.  If I put the wireless router on the roof of the house, and the wireless adapter's antenna on the roof of the workshop, I'd get 4/5 bars of signal strength, so IMO it's just a matter of getting two antennas outside of both structures.



#10 Gruber_Hans

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Posted 26 November 2017 - 12:47 PM

 

Look it's 60 feet.  The link I posted said you can get over 300 feet outside with line-of-site.  I see no reason to drop $xxx.xx for special hardware to get wireless to travel 20% of it's maximum distance. I don't think throwing money at the problem solves the problem.

 

I've spent some time reading up on making DIY directional antennas, and you can buy one for $20.00.  I don't think I need that.  I think I need to run a cable from the wireless router to an antenna and zip tie it to something on my roof.  Not sure what the wireless bridge does or how it works, but I have a feeling I can set that up at the shop, connect a basic $5.00 antenna mounted on the roof of the shop and make the thing work.  I don't think I need to spend a lot of money to get a wireless connection over 60 feet.  That's only 20% of the maximum range of the wireless.

 

I don't think I need to spend over a hundred dollars to get a wireless connection over 60 feet, which is 20% of the maximum range of the wireless router.

 

The wireless router's maximum range is over 300 feet.  I want to establish a wireless connection over just 60 feet, which is about 20% of the wireless router's maximum.

 

The wireless connection I'm trying to establish is only about 60 feet apart, and the maximum range of my wireless router is over 300 feet.  I don't think I need to spend over a hundred dollars on hardware in order to get this connection set up.

 

How many times should I repeat this before it starts to make sense to the people that are "helping" me?

My apologies if I offended you in any way.

I have recommended solutions that are tested and true.
These would be the suggestions I would give my own customers to insure problemfree operation.

I would suggest you try your own ideas and see if they will work.
Then come back and let the forum and Google know what you did and how you solved it so that others might benefit from it as well :)

tfn

.

 

 

 

So as I read between the lines  here you didn't really read my op, gave me a "cookie-cutter", one size fits all opinion, with the idea that it's the same solution you've used in other places, the whole "when you are a hammer, everything looks like a nail", and now that your one-size-fits-all solution has been determined to be impractical, your 2nd response is that I'll get no other constructive answer, that I should find my own answer and then post that answer here for someone else.

 

I've been on tech forums for years.  I've seen your personality numerous times in the past.  You aren't really here to help, you don't really pay attention to the problem, you have a handful of "solutions" that you post repeatedly in a "one size fits all" manner,  and you adopt the attitude that if you can't solve it, it can't be solved.  The truth is that it can't be solved by YOU, and primarily because you aren't really interested in solving problems, just appearing to be doing so, much like virtue signalling, And also the whole idea that I'm "offended" reduces the technical inadequacy of your suggestion to some kind of interpersonal problem, which is just another tactic by you to avoid having to face the fact that your technical "solution" was inadequate.  I'm not "offended" at all, in fact I'm doing you a favor, and risking Moderator attention, by instructing you on your poor quality answer, your failure to actually read the problem and the poor manner in which you reacted to being told the truth of your inadequate online troubleshooting skills.  You have a lot of learning to do and I suggest you step out of this thread and contemplate what they learning might look like.  Any simpleton can advocate throwing money at a problem in order to create the illusion of helpfulness.  It's easier than actually thinking about the problem and having the skillset to deal with it in the most efficient manner possible.



#11 toofarnorth

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Posted 26 November 2017 - 04:02 PM

Giving you advice on how to do it with the equipment you have is like giving a redneck advice on how to put Nitrous Oxide in his 25 year old car.
It will most likely not work like the redneck thought and someone will be blamed.


Do it properly, preferably by digging a 60feet trench and laying down some cable.


And this, believe it or not, is actually being helpful.

tfn out
 



#12 xrobwx

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Posted 28 November 2017 - 11:48 PM

I have Spectrum internet, my own Docsis 3.0 Wireless Aries 6580-2 Surfboard Cable Modem, A Linksys WRT54GL Wireless Router and new, unused in a box I have a Linksys Wireless Bridge (and I have no idea what this is or how it's used).  And a bunch of Cat 5 ethernet cable.

 

What I'd like to do is use the hardware that I have to get internet into my Workshop (60 feet away, clear line of sight, no trees) wirelessly.

 

Can this be done?  If so, how?

 

I don't want to run cable, because if I do I'll have to bury it and that's more hassle than I want.  Any help appreciated and thanks in advance.

http://www.antenna-theory.com/

 

http://www.antenna-theory.com/definitions/2p4GHzAntenna.php

 

http://downloads.linksys.com/downloads/userguide/1224638535453/WET610N_V10_UG_A-WEB.pdf

 

http://www.l-com.com/wireless-antenna

 

I say it can be done but I don't know how to get the signal from the router to the antenna or get the signal from the antenna to the bridge. Do these antennas have RJ45 connectors? The ones I see either have the BNC or the SMC connectors.  I really don't know.  It seems you would need some device that converts the signal from the router to the antenna. 

 

Or! Put the router and the bridge outside.

https://www.polycase.com/waterproof-enclosures  

Cheap too or if you have something around the shop to fabricate a weatherproof enclosure, then $0.


Edited by xrobwx, 29 November 2017 - 12:15 AM.

7581204627.png


#13 Elizabeeth

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