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Weird NTFS behavior, Win7 vs NT


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#1 km4hr

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 09:55 PM

Is NTFS compatible between Win7 and NT 4.0?

 

I removed a hard drive from an NT 4.0 machine and installed it on a Win7 machine (slave drive, not the boot drive). Everything appeared normal. I could list and access files, folders, etc. I then created a file on the drive. Again, everything looked normal. But when I put the drive back into the NT computer the drive was not even recognized. Dr. Watson said the device was inaccessible or something.

 

I did the same thing with a bootable drive. Again I removed the drive from the NT machine and installed it on a Win7 machine, then copied a file onto the drive. Everything looked fine on Win7. But when the drive was returned to the NT machine all it would do is core dump.

 

Is this normal? Did NTFS change over the years?

 

I won't go into why I need to do this but if anyone is curious I'd be happy to explain.

 



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#2 hamluis

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 06:20 AM

The only question I have:  What file are you creating on Win 7? 

 

Louis



#3 km4hr

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 12:47 PM

Louis,

 

The file is an ATI video driver file. I need to find a way to transfer it to the NT machine so I can install it.

 

The only device that works properly on the NT machine is the 3.5 floppy drive, but floppies don't have enough capacity to hold the ATI driver file. So I need another way to transfer the driver to the NT machine.

 

I tried copying the file onto a CD and a DVD. But the the NT machine won't read either of them. The NT machine says the device is not available when the CD/DVD is installed. It acts like there's no disk in the drive at all. The machine reads manufactured DVD's correctly, but not the CD or DVD that I burned on the Win7 machine.

 

I'm going to try to connect the NT and Win7 machines together directly using an ethernet cable to see if I can transfer the file using the network interface.

 

Seems like a lot of trouble just to get a file onto the NT machine.

 

Thanks for your consideration.



#4 hamluis

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 01:23 PM

You cannot just download the driver onto the NT system?

 

Sounds to me as if your NT system is the problem...I see nothing that a Win 7 system or file on such...can be held accountable for.

 

Louis



#5 km4hr

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 11:32 PM

You cannot just download the driver onto the NT system?

 

Sounds to me as if your NT system is the problem...I see nothing that a Win 7 system or file on such...can be held accountable for.

 

Louis

 

No, networking is not simple where I work. Massive IT (Information Taliban) approval, security, anti-virus software, etc,etc,etc is strictly enforced. This bare bones NT box doesn't stand a snow ball's chance in hades of getting onto a network. I'd risk job termination if I even thought about plugging it in to an ethernet jack.



#6 km4hr

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Posted 20 November 2017 - 02:35 PM

Problem solved! As usual when you have a problem, turn to Linux. I burned the CD on a Linux box. The NT 4.0 box reads it perfectly. This is typical of my experience Windows. I wish I could work with Linux full time and forget about Windows!

 

Conclusion: If you need to reliably burn a CD for a Windows computer, don't burn it on another Windows box. Windows CD burners are apparently incompatible with each other. Use Linux instead. Linux conforms to industry standards, not Microsoft proprietary standards.



#7 hamluis

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Posted 20 November 2017 - 05:57 PM

:thumbup2:, whatever works :)>

 

Happy computing :).

 

Louis






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