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Fixing Stripped Screw Out Screw Bases, Ripped Off Cover Holders On Laptop


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#1 F-1DeskLamp

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 06:00 PM

I have a laptop I'm working on, and the plastic parts which protrude, and then a metal kind of nut lays in them to receive a screw from the outside in order to hold the shell closed are broken off.  It gives the effect of "never end" unscrewing when the screw is being taken out.  

I filled up the broken gaps where those nuts are supposed to fit, and then placed the nut into the epoxy.  After it dried in there, I piled up more of a thicker viscosity round it to form a base.

 

Around the screen the border snaps on with small snaps all of the way around the screen.  Some of the snap holders have popped off, and so I'm trying to epoxy them back on.  

On of the screw holes for holding the border on around the screen was stripped out, so the screw head would just pass through it.  I needed a washer, but instead I have used tape on the backing, filled in the hole with epoxy, and I'll drill a new hold that is small enough the head of the screw can not pass through it.  

 

 

How do you guys deal with these problems?  



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#2 JohnC_21

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 06:45 PM

I would add a couple of things to your arsenal. Epoxy putty and CA glue with the addition of CA accelerator. 



#3 F-1DeskLamp

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 07:13 PM

Sounds good.  Thanks.  



#4 mjd420nova

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 10:30 PM

Look in Craigs list or Ebay, they are available if you pay shipping.



#5 F-1DeskLamp

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 10:41 PM

" they"  Epoxy and glue?



#6 F-1DeskLamp

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 10:44 PM

How do you get epoxy out of a screw receptacle which is blocking the screw from going all of the way in?  I wung it the first two, and then the next two I toar off some cotton off of cotton swabs, and screwed that in until it dried.  Then I pulled out the cotton, and no problem.  But the other two have a little epoxy that dried up in them from the bottom of the wells.  



#7 mjd420nova

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 10:59 PM

Believe me, don't pull your hair out.  A needle will help to remove the epoxy but it is tedious.  Save the heartache when you get it all together and a small event cause an insert (brass threaded) to pop from the epoxy.  Back to square one.  Been there done that.  All that work and POP,  No crying.



#8 F-1DeskLamp

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 11:05 PM

Epoxy is weak?  

How about JB Weld? 



#9 The-Toolman

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 07:55 AM

Epoxy is weak?  

How about JB Weld? 

JB Weld is epoxy.


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#10 britechguy

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 09:59 AM

No, epoxy is generally not weak.  That being said, epoxy putty sets like a rock (almost literally) and is much harder when set than straight epoxy glue is.  It really depends on just how much stress a given connection will be put through.  For micro screws I'd most likely use straight liquid epoxy, myself, but if you need either extra strength or need to rebuild something where liquid cannot be contained to do it then epoxy putty is the way to go.  Just be aware that while most screws can self-tap into solidified liquid epoxy if a tiny starter poke is created by a needle for non-pointed ones, that's not the case for epoxy putty.  You will have to drill set putty out with a guide hole for the screw.

 

Were I you, and if you're intending to do this sort of repair regularly, I would invest in a rotary tool (e.g. Dremel) with a flexible extension and chuck, and get some jeweler's drill bits (see here) so that you can either drill guide holes or use them to drill enough holes in the epoxy that it's easy to pick it out with a pick.

 

I don't think you're ever going to succeed with the snap tabs as far as gluing them is concerned, unless you have the space to build up a larger "base" around where you're gluing them with extra epoxy.  There's just not enough surface area to create a bond that can withstand the shear that these things go through when in the process of being snapped into place.

 

I might undertake what you've undertaken for my personal amusement on a machine I wanted to keep for some reason, but if it were someone else's, and financial considerations are not a factor in keeping it, I'd definitely recommend a new machine and data transfer.  It's more cost effective than the amount of an average tech's hourly charge to do the kind of work you describe if we're talking about more than one or two of the repairs you've mentioned.


Edited by britechguy, 13 November 2017 - 10:02 AM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website address in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

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#11 mightywiz

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 05:53 PM

I won't repair with epoxy!

 

I replace plastic parts with new oem parts!

 

epoxy is always a temporary fix and will always break again if you return the computer to the same person.

 

I have used epoxy in the past and it's not worth the time or effort put into it.

 

the time I spend doing the repair labor wise is equal to the amout it was to just buy the oem part!

 

now if your doing this repair yourself for your own computer, then have at it.

 

but i'm in business to make a buck and if it breaks then i have a pissed

off customer that wants it fixed again for free.



#12 britechguy

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 07:50 PM

mightywiz,

 

          I can't disagree with what you say, at least in an ideal world.

 

          I would not even agree to do any sort of even "semi-guaranteed" repair on a machine in the condition the OP describes, and would say so directly to the client.

 

          If, however, they insisted, I would.  Most people who request these sorts of repairs are not in the financial position to acquire OEM parts for the entire exterior of their laptops, for instance.

 

          When I think that something does not make financial sense for a client over buying new (whether that's parts or a whole replacement machine) I tell them so.  Some have really strong attachments to a given device, and I tell them that I can put it back together again, much like Humpty Dumpty, but that it's a last gasp patching attempt, not a real long-term fix.  As long as they're fully informed . . .

 

(And I have to disagree entirely with regard to epoxy putty.  Regular glue can be anything from excellent to nearly useless depending on what is broken, and how).


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website address in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

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#13 JohnC_21

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 08:12 PM

I've seen epoxy putty (pig putty) used in prototype forming sections as a quick fix vs welding up a steel section and machining the weld to a different form profile and it did the job. It's amazing stuff.



#14 F-1DeskLamp

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 09:04 PM

I might undertake what you've undertaken for my personal amusement on a machine I wanted to keep for some reason, but if it were someone else's, and financial considerations are not a factor in keeping it, I'd definitely recommend a new machine and data transfer.  It's more cost effective than the amount of an average tech's hourly charge to do the kind of work you describe if we're talking about more than one or two of the repairs you've mentioned.

 

 

This is a friends laptop that wouldn't turn on until I soldered the wires back on the powerjack inside, and I'm just seeing what I can fix on it.  

 

I'm going to start to do this for a hobby, and play the market with these things.  Buy 'em broke or cheap.  Repair or build, and see how it goes.  I'm trying to get into computers as a kind of science, so I'll give this a stab.  



#15 F-1DeskLamp

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 09:06 PM

I won't repair with epoxy!

 

I replace plastic parts with new oem parts!

 

epoxy is always a temporary fix and will always break again if you return the computer to the same person.

 

I have used epoxy in the past and it's not worth the time or effort put into it.

 

the time I spend doing the repair labor wise is equal to the amout it was to just buy the oem part!

 

now if your doing this repair yourself for your own computer, then have at it.

 

but i'm in business to make a buck and if it breaks then i have a pissed

off customer that wants it fixed again for free.

 

 

 

Ya, I have seen a lot of businesses possible with this strategy.  I think it depends on what kind of market you have, your operating costs, and what reputation your brand has in the market.  I'm doing it for sport right now.  Maybe a business later. 






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