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Macrium Cloning Question (and, actually, probably more general)


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#1 britechguy

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Posted 09 November 2017 - 12:04 PM

In looking through Macrium's documentation they do not say, explicitly, that their clone process does not attempt to clone bad sectors, though I would have to believe that it does not.   Would I be correct in that belief?

 

More generally, is there any disc cloning software that is currently produced that doesn't ignore bad sectors?

 

There would be no reason to include anything in a clone that is marked as unusable on the original medium, but I seem to recall a very long time ago that some products did.

 

I've picked up a new 1TB SSHD that I intend to transplant into this computer, and it makes a lot more sense to me to do a clone (if the drive does not have a full catastrophic failure - I do have system images I could use) rather than a restore, then merge the 500GB of what would be unallocated space in to C:\ after the clone is complete (or as part of the clone, as it seems that Macrium supports resizing partitions as part of the clone process if one so chooses).

 


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#2 JohnC_21

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Posted 09 November 2017 - 12:44 PM

Macrium has an intelligent sector copy where only sectors in use are uses. That would, I assume, not include sectors marked as bad. There is a setting to select sector by sector clone called Forensic Sector Copy where every sector is copied. Doing this you would need a target drive as big as or bigger than the source drive.

 

https://knowledgebase.macrium.com/display/KNOW/Cloning+a+disk

 

image2015-5-9%2010%3A35%3A56.png?version

Easeus also offers sector by sector for a clone.

 

https://www.todo-backup.com/backup-resource/copy-and-clone-hard-drive.htm


Edited by JohnC_21, 09 November 2017 - 12:49 PM.


#3 britechguy

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Posted 09 November 2017 - 01:10 PM

John,

 

        Thanks.  I'd seen the information for the "sector by sector" clones, and they're a special case (and, as far as I can tell, an actual clone in the 100% sense).

 

         Once I have the new drive I'm going to do a conventional rather than "sector by sector" clone and then transplant it into this machine.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website address in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose
              

 


#4 RolandJS

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Posted 09 November 2017 - 01:22 PM

"...More generally, is there any disc cloning software that is currently produced that doesn't ignore bad sectors?"

If I correctly read scuttlebutt elsewhere, any program capable of "forensic-level, sector by sector" will "copy" bad sectors; in short, cloning is pretty much 1s and 0s from beginning to end, whatever is found, is cloned.


I see that JohnC and I were posting almost at the same time  :)


Edited by RolandJS, 09 November 2017 - 01:23 PM.

"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (sevenforums)

Clone or Image often! Backup, backup, backup, backup... -- RockE (Windows Secrets Lounge)


#5 RolandJS

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Posted 09 November 2017 - 01:35 PM

JohnC, thanks to you, I learned something new today!  I knew MR6 & MR7 had Intelligent Sector Copy for making full images, but because I have not made a clone using MR, I never knew, until today reading your post, that MR's Intelligent Sector Copy also is used with its clone operations - when clicked.

 

BriTechGuy, I'm hoping you post your success in this operation of yours!  I'm looking forward to learning a lot more from your experiences as well!


"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (sevenforums)

Clone or Image often! Backup, backup, backup, backup... -- RockE (Windows Secrets Lounge)


#6 britechguy

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Posted 09 November 2017 - 02:05 PM

Roland,

 

         I doubt that there will be much to learn unless you want the nitty gritty of disassembiling the laptop to swap out the drive, and the step-by-steps to do that are available from HP's support site itself in the Service & Maintenance Manual for the specific model line.

 

         The last time I cloned a drive, which was some years back, I used Miray HD Clone, which worked beautifully.  I have little doubt that either Macrium or EaseUS ToDo will not do so as well.  When I did that clone it was for precisely the same reason:  a failing hard drive that was giving me warning signs that complete failure was eventually going to occur.  All I did then was to swap out the drives and the machine fired up as though it had never had a drive transplant.  The only difference this time is that it looks like Macrium will allow you to do the partition/logical drive resizing as part of the clone itself, which is quite handy.

 

          I can, however, take screen shots if anyone thinks those would prove instructive.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website address in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose
              

 


#7 tos226

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Posted 10 November 2017 - 11:12 PM

I may be out of line here, but why would you clone when you can reimage? I come from Acronis, and I did new drives several times on XP and twice on 7 and once on 10 and reimage permits resizing and packs the data neatly onto a new drive including MBR and signature if you so chose. I think Macrium can do the same.

I once, long ago, read a interesting thread on the subject done by expert people on the ATI forum which recomends reimaging over cloning. If I find the link I'll be back to post it.

 

Here's one bunch of instructions about cloning and bad sectors - likely ATI feature

https://forum.acronis.com/forum/acronis-true-image-2017-forum/important-cloning-how-not-do

 

that's not the one I have in mind though.


Edited by tos226, 10 November 2017 - 11:33 PM.


#8 britechguy

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Posted 10 November 2017 - 11:32 PM

tos206,

 

         Because it's more straightforward to clone if what I'm looking for is a quick way to make a "plug n' play" duplicate of the existing hard drive.

 

         If by "reimaging" you mean recovering from a system image I could do that, too, but why bother?  The image is of the source drive as it was about 2 weeks ago, and while I haven't created massive amounts of new data since then I have created some, that comes right on over with a clone.

 

         Macrium allows you to do reshuffling of the drive you're cloning to if it is larger than the source drive.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website address in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose
              

 


#9 tos226

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 11:14 PM

Britechguy, understood, thanks.

I only have laptops. Changing drives is possible, but takes a bit of time and great care. Not something I'd do often :)






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