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One specific Wi-Fi connection very slow on one computer


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#1 Prof-Meowington

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Posted 31 October 2017 - 05:54 PM

Hello everyone,

I have a strange problem which is driving me crazy. I am sharing my Internet connection with the neighbor. There is only a repeater in our flat, the router is in theirs. For this reason I am not able to connect through cable. The Wi-Fi connection is used by at least 3-10 other devices and there are no issues with it for those devices. I have also tried connecting my PC to other networks, for example two different hotspots on my phones, and the Internet works just fine. But this one specific network does not want to work with my Asus USB-N10 150 Mbps 11n USB dongle. When I say it is slow, I mean it is really slow. Some webpages won't open at all, downloading a game on Steam reaches a speed of less than 10 kB/s. What gives?

I have tried uninstalling the drivers, installing the newest one, forcing 802.11 b/g mode in the Device Manager, resetting WINSOCK, IPv4, IPv6 through the command prompt, moving the dongle to different ports...

It can't be caused by the physical location, because the repeater and PC are at most 3 m apart, and no obstructions between. Any other ideas? I don't have AMD Quick Stream, which I heard can cause issues. Using Windows 10. Would be very thankful for help!

Hardware:
GTX 980 Ti , 8 GB Corsair Vengeance, Asus P8Z68-V LX, Intel Core i5 2500K, Creative XtremeMusic X-fi, 700W CoolerMaster SilentPro, Fractal Design R3, 128 GB Kingston HyperX + Sandisk Ultra Plus 256 GB + 2 TB HDD + 500 GB HDD.



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#2 arlattimor

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Posted 01 November 2017 - 09:02 AM

You need to ask your neighbor do the have Wifi Multimedia Service Enabled on their router. This is a wifi equivalent of Quality of Service. If WMM is not enabled then this will cause other devices on the network to be bandwidth hogs.  


Edited by arlattimor, 01 November 2017 - 09:02 AM.

A. Lattimore

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#3 Prof-Meowington

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Posted 01 November 2017 - 04:09 PM

Don't think it's related to other devices on the network, because it's the same if they are not home and I don't do anything on my other devices. I mean it's so slow that even webpages time out when loading, doesn't seem right.



#4 toofarnorth

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Posted 01 November 2017 - 04:40 PM

Can you connect directly to their ssid instead of going through the repeater?

tfn



#5 Prof-Meowington

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Posted 01 November 2017 - 04:52 PM

If I unplug the repeater, it doesn't find the network anymore. I guess the signal is too weak for the dongle, because my mobile devices can still find it.



#6 arlattimor

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Posted 01 November 2017 - 04:54 PM

Do you have a wifi analyzer? you need to measure your signal strength or RSSI. If it is -70 or higher you have a weak signal.


A. Lattimore

CCNA, CWNA, MCITP, MCSA, MCT, MCP, Security+, Server+, Linux+, Network+, A+, CNST

Network Security Engineer

 





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